From Obama Nation to Abomination 2


From Obama Nation to Abomination Part 3

In Part 1 of this essay, we looked at the unlikely results of the 2016 election. In Part 2 of this essay, we tried to find the underlying reason so many voted for Trump. That effort was largely unsuccessful. In Part 3 of this essay, then, we will further explore the chasm between Clinton voters and Trump voters, and ultimately unmask the underlying reason so many voted for Trump.

Let's begin by recalling where we left off in Part 2 of this essay--where we wondered if, in opposition to the numerous articles and commentaries blaming Trump's victory on Clinton and her failure to connect with voters in the "rust-belt" (which is a chicken-shit way of saying she refused to lie to them and tell them she was gonna bring their jobs back and "Make America Great Again", a la Trump), the election was more accurately a referendum on recent changes in the American landscape, i.e. multi-culturalism, a black President, the possibility of a woman president.. and that "Change" lost to "Obstruct, and if possible, go backwards."

Well, at first glance, this failed to adequately explain the voting patterns of the states. There were states with a very large white population that voted for Clinton, and states with a relatively large minority population that voted for Trump.

So let us now take a second glance...

Perhaps this approach was fundamentally flawed in that it presumed white voters of the same economic background but from different regions of the country would vote in a similar manner...

Let us, then, look back at the last time the nation seemed so divided--when one side was so opposed to the changes on the horizon it tried to leave the Union--and see if the battle lines then drawn bear any resemblance to the battle lines of today...


Finding #11: The 2016 election was the latest in a series of "battles" tracing back to the nation's beginning.

Here are the 11 states of the Confederacy, in order of their secession from the Union, along with how they voted in the most recent election (counting only votes for Clinton or Trump).

SC 42.6, MS 40.8, FL 49.4, AL 35.6, GA 47.4, LA 39.8, TX 45.2, VA 52.9, AR 35.6, TN 36.4, NC 48.1

And here are the two states split in their loyalty between the Confederacy and the Union. (The Confederacy claimed these states as part of the Confederacy, but they never officially seceded from the Union. They are in order by when they joined the Union.)

KY 34.3, MO 39.9

Trump won 12 of the 13.

Now, here are three states in which slavery was legal in 1860, that nevertheless opted to stay and fight with the Union. (They are in order by when they joined the Union. Note that West Virginia actually broke off from Virginia and re-joined the Union during the war).

DE 56.0, MD 63.8, WV 27.9

And here are the rest of the Union states, in order by when they joined the Union.

PA 49.6, NJ 57.3, CT 57.2, MA 64.5, NH 50.2, NY 61.3, RI 58.3, VT 65.2, OH 45.8, IN 40.0, IL 59.0, ME 51.5, MI 49.9, IA 44.9, WI 49.6, CA 66.1, MN 50.8, OR 56.2, KS 38.8, NV 51.3    

Wow. Clinton won only 1 of the 13 former Confederate States, but 15 of the 23 states supporting the Union. Let's flip this. Trump won 12 of the 13 states itching to leave the Union over slavery, but only 8 of the 23 states willing to fight to the death in order to preserve the Union. 

And it's not as if this is the only connection between the states voting for Trump and systemic racism.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 gave the U.S. Government oversight of the electoral process of 7 states with a history of denying minorities their right to vote. 6 of these 7 states voted for Trump in 2016. (Virginia was once again the exception.) This issue was reviewed over the next 5 years or so, and two other states--Arizona and Texas--were added to the list. Both of these voted for Trump. That means 8 of the 9 states whose elections were placed under federal control due to their history of denying minorities their right to vote in the 1960's and 1970's voted for Trump in 2016.

But that's not the whole story. Parts of 7 other states were similarly placed under federal oversight as a result of their treatment of African-Americans. 4 of these voted for Trump. That means 12 of the 16 states singled-out by the Voting Rights Act as a result of their history of hostility to African-Americans voted for Trump.

And that's not the only metric through which one can view historical racism. In 1967, the Supreme Court ruled in Loving v. Virginia that men and women from different races could marry. Astoundingly, this overturned the current law in 16 states. Trump won 14 of these 16 states (with DE and VA  being the exceptions.) But it's even worse than that. 9 states had never had laws prohibiting inter-racial marriage. 7 of these voted for Clinton. By 1951, moreover, 13 states had repealed their laws prohibiting inter-racial marriage. 8 of these voted for Clinton. Well, this means that in 1952--at the beginning of the modern civil rights movement--there remained 28 states with laws against inter-racial marriage--and that 23 of these would subsequently vote for Trump.

Now, I know that drawing a direct line between the election of Trump and America's history of racism isn't completely fair. West Virginia, after all, broke away from Virginia to combat slavery, and it ended up voting for Trump while Virginia voted for Clinton.

But it seems clear the ghost of the Confederacy lives on in the Trump coalition, and that the values of this coalition are, much as the values of the Confederacy, at odds with those of their Yankee cousins.

This led me, then, to embrace a not-so-original thought...


Finding #12: The American public is split into two cultures, or, more precisely, two "culture tribes." 

The rift between these tribes fluctuates over time, moreover, and can lead to civil war. Not to mention whatever it is that we have now.

That this rift is real and growing is supported, moreover, by the post-election discussion in the media of the Cracker Barrel/Whole Foods divide--where counties in which there was a Cracker Barrel restaurant voted for Trump 76% of the time, and counties in which there was a Whole Foods Market voted for Trump but 22% of the time. This 54 point wide divide was then compared to previous elections, where it was discovered the divide was but 43 points under Obama, 31 points under George W. Bush, and 19 points under Bill Clinton.

I soon discovered, furthermore, that this was just one media-friendly talking point in which the divide was illuminated, and that most any poll in which the public's preferences or attitudes were broken down by state reflect the divide. 

This map of the United States, for example, depicts the sport or recreational activity (outside of football, baseball, basketball and hockey) most inordinately mentioned on Facebook by users from each state. Well, 17 of the 24 states (plus Washington D.C.) whose primary interest lay in skiing, lacrosse, soccer, tennis, surfing or boxing voted for Clinton, and 23 of the 26 states whose primary interest lay in volleyball, softball, rodeo, golf, or bowling voted for Trump. There were 10 states, to be more specific, that seemed inordinately interested in softball. All of them voted for Trump.

And this was not the only map of this kind I discovered. This map reporting on the favorite ice cream flavors (beyond the universally-loved vanilla and chocolate) per state, similarly illuminated the cultural divide. 15 of the 21 states with a disproportionate desire for coffee or mint chocolate ice cream voted for Clinton, while 24 of the 29 states with a disproportionate desire for cookie dough, brownie, or strawberry ice cream voted for Trump.

The divide was apparent, moreover, in all kinds of articles. This article regarding Google searches for plastic surgery procedures was especially revealing. 11 of the 15 states showing a keen interest in laser hair removal, lip injection, or eyelid surgery voted for Clinton, while 26 of the 35 states showing a keen interest in liposuction, breast implants, penis enlargement or vaginal rejuvenation voted for Trump. (Not to be tacky, but 9 states showed an inordinate interest in penis enlargement--and 8 of them voted for Trump.)

This list, regarding the primary drug of choice among those in rehab, was also revealing. 7 of the 8 states (plus Washington D.C.) in which heroin was the most common culprit voted for Clinton. Meanwhile, 22 of the 28 states in which marijuana was the primary problem voted for Trump.

From looking at these maps and lists, moreover, I developed what felt like an original idea. I decided to find 26 lists (I ended up finding more) in which the states were ranked in order--and then add up the rankings to see if this illuminated the cultural divide from A-Z. 

I decided to do this, furthermore, while avoiding metrics regarding race and the economy. 

THE CULTURAL DIVIDE FROM A-Z (AND BEYOND)


A.  This list presents the states by population density, reflecting inhabitants per square mile.

The 7 most densely populated states (plus Washington D.C.) voted for Clinton, while 9 of the 11 least densely populated states voted for Trump.

B. This list presents the states by number of cattle per capita.

9 of the 10 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the fewest cows per capita voted for Clinton, while the 10--or, even more telling, 13 of the 14--states with the most cows per capita voted for Trump.


C. This list presents the states by the percentage of car sales that are pick-up truck sales.

The smallest percentage of pick-up truck sales was in Washington in D.C., which had the largest percentage of voters for Clinton. And the largest percentage of pick-up truck sales was in Wyoming, which had the largest percentage of voters for Trump. Beyond that, Clinton won 13 of the 14 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the smallest percentage of pick-up truck sales, and Trump won the 15 states with the largest percentage of pick-up truck sales.

D.  This map and this map were consulted in order to estimate the relative levels of gun ownership among the states.

The 11 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the lowest level of gun ownership voted for Clinton, while the 13 states--and 22 of the 24 states --with the highest levels of gun ownership voted for Trump. Wow. The NRA got their man.

E. Having established that Trump voters love their guns, I decided to check to see if they loved their dogs as well. This map reflects dog ownership rates as compared to cat ownership rates. (While I couldn't find the precise statistics behind the map, and the map excluded AK and HI, it nevertheless helped illuminate the cultural divide.)

9 states had more cats than dogs. 8 of these voted for Clinton. 15 states (plus Washington D.C.) either had more cats than dogs or had 3% more dogs than cats or less. 12 of these (plus Washington D.C.) voted for Clinton. 8 states had 12% or more dogs than cats. 7 of these voted for Trump.


F. This list presents the percentage of homes that are mobile homes, by state.

The 9 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the lowest percentage of mobile homes voted for Clinton, while 15 of the 17 states with the highest percentage of mobile homes voted for Trump.


G. This list presents the number of cigarette smokers per 100 adults by state.

19 of the 26 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the lowest percentage of tobacco smokers voted for Clinton, while the 14 states--and 23 of the 24 states--with the highest percentage of tobacco smokers voted for Trump.


H. Now, these maps and lists, so far, have pretty much confirmed what we already knew: that Clinton got the urban vote and Trump got the rural vote. But some aspects of American life can't be classified as urban or rural. One such aspect is the consumption of alcohol.

When one looks at binge-drinking, for example, one finds that although your average Clinton state voter is more likely to go on a drinking binge than your average Trump state voter (Trump, in fact, won 15 of the 19 states with the fewest binge drinkers), that their binges were far less intense than the binges enjoyed? by Trump state voters. To wit, Clinton won 12 of the 15 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the fewest drinks per binge, while Trump won 17 of the 19 states with the most drinks per binge.

When I multiplied the number of binge drinkers per 100 adults by state by the number of drinks consumed by the average binge-drinker per binge by state, moreover, the results proved confusing.

The 6 states with the fewest binge drinks per capita voted for Trump. But the 5 states with the most binge drinks per capita also voted for Trump.

This led me to look for something more illustrative of the cultural divide.

I looked at the percentage of traffic fatalities per state that had been attributed to drunk driving. This metric was even more confusing. Trump won 14 of the 17, and 18 of the 23, states with the lowest percentage of traffic fatalities attributed to drunk driving. But he also won 4 of the 5, and 12 of the 22, states with the highest percentage of traffic fatalities attributed to drunk driving. So there wasn't much one could take from this.

I almost gave up. Eventually however, I discovered that there was a metric relating to alcohol consumption that was illustrative of the cultural divide I was seeking to identify. And that was the ratio of beer consumption to wine consumption per state, based on this list and this list.

Not surprisingly, more beer than wine was consumed in every state. The 12 states (plus Washington D.C.)--and 18 of the 20 states--in which beer and wine consumption was at the closest levels, however, voted for Clinton. 16 states drank beer over wine by a ratio of 5.5 to 1, or more. All of them voted for Trump. 26 of the 27--and 28 of the 30--states drinking the most beer in comparison to wine voted for Trump.

So, what can be made of this? If you live in a red state and you want to turn it blue, you need to drink more wine. Lots of it...



I. I subsequently came across this map and this list which further illustrated of the red state/blue state divide regarding drug use/abuse. They presented the number of opioid painkiller prescriptions per 100 people, by state. Surprisingly, the 5 states with the smallest number--and 11 of the 14 states with the smallest number--of opioid painkiller prescriptions per capita voted for Clinton, and the 12 states with the largest number of opioid painkiller prescriptions per capita voted for Trump.

Well, this, along with the list already mentioned regarding the drug of choice of people in rehab, supports that Clinton states and Trump states both love their heroin. It's just that Trump states prefer it in pill form.

I decided to check this list against the age-adjusted rate for drug overdoses, moreover, to see which method of delivery was more lethal.

The results were a mish-mash. While the 5 states with the lowest age-adjusted OD rates voted for Trump, so did 4 of the 6 states with the highest age-adjusted OD rates.


J. This recurrent theme--that red states and blue states have similar instincts (to drink alcohol, to kill pain...), but follow these instincts in a different manner, quite naturally, led me to wonder about sex.

While red states are often presented as being more religious and clean-cut than blue states, I decided to put this to the test.

This website, at least until Trump removes its funding, tracks sexually transmitted diseases, by state. While 6 of the 10 states with the lowest rate of chlamydia voted for Clinton, 9 of the 10 states with the highest rate of chlamydia voted for Trump. While 11 of the 17 state with the lowest rate of gonorrhea voted for Clinton, the 12 states with the highest rate of gonorrhea voted for Trump.

When one combines the rates for chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis, moreover, the results were also quite telling.

While 10 of the 18 states with the lowest rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis combined voted for Clinton, 17 of the 24 states with the highest rates of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis (which we will shorten to "STDs") voted for Trump.
A closer look proves even more revealing. While 9 of the 10 states with the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases voted for Trump, the highest rate, by far, was in Washington D.C. (Somehow, this isn't surprising.)

This led me, then, to look at HIV Infection per 100,00, to see if this metric similarly reflected the cultural divide.

It didn't. While Clinton won the 2 states with the lowest infection rates, Trump won 12 of the 15 states with the lowest infection rates.

But don't get too excited. He also won the 3 states with the highest infection rates, and 13 of the 21 states with the highest infection rates.


K. This led me, then, to look back at this list purported to represent the percentage of LGBT adults by state, to see if there's a correlation between state-wide HIV rates and statewide LGBT rates. 


To refresh, this list revealed that Clinton won 10 of the 11 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the largest percentage of residents identifying as Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, or Transgender. And that Trump won the 12 states with the smallest percentage of residents identifying as LGB or T.

There wasn't an obvious correlation between the rankings on this list and the HIV rate, however. States like Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire have a large LGBT population but have low rates of HIV. Conversely, states like Mississippi, Louisiana and Tennessee ranked lower than average on the LGBT list but had high rates of HIV.

Here, see for yourself. (The states are followed by the pct. of the vote for Clinton when narrowed down to Clinton/Trump. This is then followed by the rankings of the state by the pct. of its population identifying as LGB or T, from lowest to highest, and then its HIV rate from lowest to highest. The final number is the difference between the two.)

L-H LGBT - L-H HIV

1-10: VT 65.2 (48-2) 46, ME 51.5 (47-8) 39, SD 34.0 (44-6) 38, OR 56.2 (49-16) 33, NH 50.2 (32-1) 31, RI 58.3 (46-18) 28, HI 67.5 (50-27) 23, WA 58.8 (41-19) 22, KS 38.8 (33-15) 18, MA 64.5 (45-29) 16,

11-20: MI 49.9 (36-22) 14,
AK 41.6 (23-9) 14,
KY 34.3 (39-25) 14, WY 24.3 (12-5) 7, AZ 48.1 (40-34) 6, WV 27.9 (17-11) 6, OH 45.8 (30-26) 4, CA 66.1 (42-39) 3, CT 57.2 (25-23) 2, WI 49.6 (11-10) 1,

21-25: DC (66.1) 90.9 (51-51) 0
, IL 59.0 (37-38) -1, NV 51.3 (43-44) -1, MT 38.9 (2-3) -1, ID 31.7 (5-4) -1,

26-30:CO 52.7 (19-21) -2,
MN 50.8 (15-17) -2, IN 40.0 (34-32) -2, OK 30.7 (26-28) -2, IA 44.9 (9-12) -3,

31-40: MO 39.9 (21-24) -3,
AR 35.8 (27-30) -3, UT 37.7 (7-13) -6, NY 61.3 (38-43) -5, NJ 57.3 (35-40) -5, ND 30.2 (1-7) -6, NM 54.7 (13-20) -7, NE 36.4 (6-14) -8, DE 56.0 (24-36) -12, TX 45.2 (31-45) -14,

41-51: FL 49.4 (29-48) -19, NC 48.1 (22-41) -19, VA 52.9 (16-37) -21, GA 47.4 (28-49) -21, PA 49.6 (8-31) -23, AL 35.6 (10-33) -23, MD 63.8 (20-47) -27, SC 42.6 (14-42) -28, TN 36.4 (4-35) -31, LA 9.8 (18-50) -32, MS 40.8 (3-46) -43,  

Now, did you notice it? The ranking of a Clinton state on the LGBT list was on average about 15 places off the ranking of that state on the HIV list. That's not a close correlation. While the rankings of Trump states were a bit closer ( a 13.7 difference between the two rankings) that's still not much of a correlation. One might notice as well that 40% of the states with a larger than average LGBT population had a lower than average rate for HIV.

There is thereby little correlation between LGBT rankings and HIV rankings.

It seems clear from looking at this, for that matter, that HIV infection rates were more in line with other STD rates than they were with the ranking of the state by the relative size of its LGBT community.

If so, then, HIV infection rates, as other STD rates, reflect that more unprotected or irresponsible sex takes place in red states than blue states.

It was while performing this comparison, moreover, that I recognized a rough correlation between HIV rates and a list I'd studied previously: race. To wit, 84% of the states that were whiter than average had a lower than average rate for HIV. 

Now, there could be a number of reasons for this. But the most obvious conclusion was that non-Hispanic white Americans have a lower rate of HIV than the rest of the country.

This led me to create the following list.
(The states are followed by the pct. of the vote for Clinton when narrowed down to Clinton/Trump. This is then followed by the rankings of the state by the pct. of its population that is non-Hispanic white, from highest to lowest, and then its HIV rate from lowest to highest. The final number is the difference between the two.)

H-L NHW - L-H HIV (CGS)

1-10: NM 54.7 (48-20) 28, AK 41.6 (36-9) 27, HI 67.5 (51-27) 24, CA 66.1 (49-39) 10, WA 58.8 (27-19) 8, CO 52.7 (29-21) 8, AZ 48.1 (42-34) 8, KS 38.8 (22-15) 7, ID 31.7 (11-4) 7, RI 58.3 (23-18) 5,

11-20: CT 57.2 (28-23) 5, OR 56.2 (21-16) 5, UT 37.7 (18-13) 5, SD 34.0 (10-6) 4, MT 38.9 (7-3) 4, WY 24.3 (9-5) 4, NH 50.2 (4-1) 3,
NV 51.3 (46-44) 2, WI 49.6 (12-10) 2, TX 45.2 (47-45) 2,

21-25: VT 65.2 (2-2) 0, NE 36.4 (14-14) 0, DC (90.9 (50-51) -1, IL 59.0 (37-38) -1, NJ 57.3 (39-40) -1,

26-30: MD 63.8 (45-47) -2, NY 61.3 (41-43) -2, VA 52.9 (35-37) -2, OK 30.7 (30-28) -2, AL 35.6 (31-33) -2,

31-40: ND 30.2 (5-7) -2, DE 56.0 (33-36) -3, MI 49.9 (19-22) -3, MN 50.8 (13-17) -4, AR 35.8 (26-30) -4, MA 64.5 (24-29) -5, FL 49.4 (43-48) -5, GA 47.4 (44-49) -5, IA 44.9 (6-12) -6, MS 40.8 (40-46) -6,

41-51:
ME 51.5 (1-8) -7, MO 39.9 (17-24) -7, SC 42.6 (34-42) -8, WV 27.9 (3-11) -8, NC 48.1 (32-41) -9, OH 45.8 (16-26) -10, TN 36.4 (25-35) -10, PA 49.6 (20-31) -11, LA 39.8 (38-50) -12, IN 40.0 (15-32) -17, KY 34.3 (8-25) -17

Well, I'll be. There is a much closer correlation between the ranking of a state on lists by race and HIV than by LGBT and HIV. There was a deviation between the lists of 6 spots, on average, for the Clinton states, and 7.1 spots, on average, for the Trump states. That's a much closer correlation than there was on the previous list.

Note also that the 9 states suffering the most downward deviation between the lists--that is, the states which have the highest percentage of HIV infection in comparison to the state's ranking by non-Hispanic white population, ALL voted for Trump, as did 14 out of the 15 states with the highest percentage of HIV in comparison to the state's ranking by non-Hispanic whiteness.

And that's only part of the story. 5 of the 6--and 8 of the 12--states with the lowest percentage of HIV infection in comparison to the state's ranking by whiteness voted for Clinton.

Well, this suggests a higher percentage of HIV among white Trump state voters than among white Clinton state voters. (My search for a definitive study along these lines continues.)

So, let's go back and look at STDs, then. (Following the state's abbreviation is the pct. of the Clinton/Trump vote received by Clinton, and then the rankings of the state by pct. of non-Hispanic white population, from most to least, and combined rate of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis, from least to most. The final number then is the difference between the two.)


H-L NHW - L-H STD (CGS)
1-10: NJ 57.3 (39-10) 29, HI 67.5 (51-30) 21, MD 63.8 (45-26) 19, CT 57.2 (28-9) 19, MA 64.5 (24-8) 16, FL 49.4 (43-27) 16, NV 51.3 (46-31) 15, UT 37.7 (18-5) 13, CA 66.1 (49-37) 12, WA 58.8 (27-18) 9,

11-20:
AZ 48.1 (42-33) 9, KS 38.8 (22-13) 9, RI 58.3 (23-15) 8, TX 45.2 (47-39) 8, VA 52.9 (35-28) 7, OR 56.2 (21-16) 5, CO 52.7 (29-24) 5, ID 31.7 (11-6) 5, NY 61.3 (41-38) 3, NH 50.2 (4-1) 3,

21-25: WY 24.3 (9-7) 2, MN 50.8 (13-12) 1, WV 27.9 (3-2) 1, DC (90.9 (50-51) -1, VT 65.2 (2-3) -1,

26-30: GA 47.4 (44-45) -1, DE 56.0 (33-35) -2, NM 54.7 (48-50) -2 , PA 49.6 (20-22) -2, IL 59.0 (37-40) -3,

31-40: ME 51.5 (1-4) -3,
IA 44.9 (6-11) -5, NE 36.4 (14-20) -6, WI 49.6 (12-19) -7, MS 40.8 (40-47) -7, MT 38.9 (7-14) -7, TN 36.4 (25-32) -7, MI 49.9 (19-28) -9, KY 34.3 (8-17) -9, IN 40.0 (15-25) -10,

41-51: AL 35.6 (31-41) -10, SC 42.6 (34-46) -12, LA 39.8 (38-50) -12, AK 41.6 (36-49) -13, OK 30.7 (30-43) -13, NC 48.1 (32-48) -16, AR 35.8 (26-42) -16, ND 30.2 (5-21) -16, MO 39.9 (17-34) -17, SD 34.0 (10-29) -19, OH 45.8 (16-36) -20

Well, there it is again. There is a close correlation between the lists for race and STDs. The ranking deviation from list to list for LGBT and HIV, let's remember, was 15 for Clinton states and 13.7 for Trump states. The ranking deviation race and HIV was much smaller, 6 for Clinton states and 7.1 for Trump states. Well, the ranking deviation from list to list for race and STDs was a bit larger than that: 8.8 for Clinton states and 9.9 for Trump states. But this still means there is a far greater correlation between race and STDs than between LGBT and HIV.

And this makes the following observation significant. All 5 of the states with lower than average rates for whiteness AND STDs voted for Clinton, and all 5 of the states with higher than average rates for whiteness AND STDs voted for Trump. And that's not the worst of it. The 20 states with the lowest ranking on the combined pct. of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis list when compared to their ranking on the pct. of non-Hispanic white list voted for Trump.

Well, let's not pretend. The low rankings of Trump states when HIV and STD rankings are compared to non-Hispanic white rankings strongly suggest that white Trump supporters have a higher rate for HIV and STDs than white Clinton supporters. And this suggests a higher rate of irresponsible sex. (Unfortunately, this information is not readily available.)

My analysis of this issue is not exactly scientific, of course. It could be that the non-white residents of Trump states have far far higher rates for HIV and STDs than the non-white residents of the states won by Clinton.

But this seems unlikely. Some of the red states with the most HIV and STDs in comparison to the number of non-Hispanic white people in the state have a very small number of non-white people in the state. Look at North Dakota. It has the fifth highest percentage of white people, but ranks twenty-first when it comes to the combined rates for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis.


Let's look at this, then, from another perspective.

L. This list presents the percentage of teenage girls who get pregnant, by state. 

At first glance it shows that teenage pregnancy--much as alcohol consumption--is a purple problem, affecting both red states and blue states. On closer inspection, however, it showed a clear trend: The 5 states with the smallest percentage of pregnant teens, and 12 of the 20 states with the smallest percentage of pregnant teens, voted for Clinton, while 22 of the 30 states with the largest percentage of pregnant teens voted for Trump.


If that sounds too confusing, let me illustrate.

The 5 states in which teenage girls are the least likely to get pregnant: Clinton 5, Trump 0
The next 15: Clinton 7, Trump 8
The 30 states in which teenage girls are the most likely to get pregnant: Clinton 8, Trump 22

As far as the broader issue of whether teenage pregnancy rates correlate with STD rates and HIV rates, and support that these rates suggest irresponsible sexual behavior...the answer is, on average, YES. Of the 25 states having a higher than average rate for teenage pregnancy, 22 had a higher than average rate for STDs, and 20 of them had a higher than average rate for HIV.

M.
Of course, there could be more to this than meets the eye. Maybe the elevated rates of teenage pregnancy, STDs, and HIV among white people in Trump states came not as a result of these people having more irresponsible sex, but as a result of their having way more sex, period, due to their living in a more promiscuous and permissive environment.

But I don't think so. This list regarding marijuana usage among adolescents by state strongly suggests that it's just the opposite--that it is the Clinton/blue states that are far more permissive.

To be clear. 9 of the 10 states (plus Washington D.C.)--and 16 of the 20 states--with the highest rates of marijuana use among adolescents voted for Clinton. And the 13 states--or even more telling, 19 of the 20 states--with the lowest use of marijuana among adolescents voted for Trump.

Well, this was a bit surprising, given that the states in which marijuana use was most frequently listed as a cause for rehab largely voted for Trump.

It then hit me. Having the adolescent use of marijuana be higher in Clinton states, while having the number of people in rehab for marijuana use be lower in Clinton states, was not a contradiction, but an indication of a higher acceptance of marijuana by parents in Clinton states. To wit, as of this writing, early 2017, 8 states--Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Colorado. Massachusetts and Maine--have legalized recreational marijuana use. 7 of these voted for Clinton. 


N. This, then, feeds into a larger question. Are Clinton states more lenient when it comes to crime, in general, or is their leniency restricted to the usage of marijuana? I decided to put this a test. This list presents the incarceration rate per 100,000 adults by state. I divided these numbers by the numbers on this list which reflect the number of violent crimes per 100,000 population by state. 

Leniency (Incarceration rate divided by violent crime rate)

1-10: DC (450 1,244 0.36) 90.9, MA (400 391 1.02) 64.5, NY (530 382 1.39) 61.3, NV (930 636 1.46) 51.3, AK (940 636 1.48) 41.6, TN (960 608 1.58) 36.4, MD (710 446 1.59) 63.8, NM (980 597 1.64) 54.7, MN (380 229 1.66) 50.8, ND (470 265 1.77) 30.2,

11-20: SC (880 498 1.77) 42.6, RI (400 219 1.83) 58.3, FL (990 541 1.83) 49.4, MI (790 427 1.85) 49.9, IL (700 370 1.89) 59.0, CA (750 396 1.89) 66.1, IA (530 274 1.93) 44.9, WA (550 285 1.93) 58.8, DE (960 489 1.96) 56.0, HI (510 259 1.97) 67.5,

21-25: NJ (540 261 2.07) 57.3,
AR (1010 480 2.10) 35.8,NE (600 280 2.14) 36.4, MO (950 443 2.14) 39.9, KS (760 349 2.18) 38.8,

26-30: WV (660 302 2.19) 27.9, NC (730 330 2.21) 48.1, NH (460 196 2.35) 50.2, MT (760 324 2.35) 38.9, IN (910 365 2.48) 40.0,

31-40: SD (820 327 2.51) 34.0, CO (790 309 2.56) 52.7, CT (620 237 2.62) 57.2, WI (780 290 2.69) 49.6, PA (850 314 2.71) 49.6, ME (350 128 2.73) 51.5, AZ (1090 400 2.73) 48.1, OH (780 285 2.74) 45.8, LA (1420 515 2.76) 39.8, TX (1130 406 2.78) 45.2
 
41-51: UT (620 216 2.87) 37.7, AL (1230 427 2.88) 35.6, OR (740 232 3.19) 56.2, OK (1300 406 3.20) 30.7, GA (1220 377 3.30) 47.4, ID (860 212 4.06) 31.7, VT (410 99 4.14) 65.2, WY (840 196 4.29) 24.3, KY (950 212 4.48) 34.3, MS (1270 279 4.55) 40.8, VA (910 196 4.64) 52.9,  


Well, that's fairly impressive. Clinton won 13 of the 20 most lenient states (plus Washington D.C.) while Trump won 23 of the 30 least lenient states.  It's hard to believe this is a coincidence, particularly when one realizes that Clinton won 14 of the 20 states in which there is no death penalty, and Trump won 24 of 30 states in which there is a death penalty.

The question, then, is if this attitude--that people breaking the rule of law need to be punished--or, conversely--that people breaking the rule of law need to be understood--carries over into other aspects of the lives of Trump and Clinton voters.

O.  I suspect so. This list presents the number of child and adolescent psychiatrists per 100,00 children by state.

Surprisingly, 15 of the 17 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the largest number of child and adolescent psychiatrists per child voted for Clinton, while 17 of the 18--and 28 of the 33--states with the smallest number of child and adolescent psychiatrists per child voted for Trump.

This realization--that there is a fundamental difference in the way children are raised in blue states as opposed to red states--led me back to something I'd noticed earlier.

P.
This list not only presents the percentage of teenage girls by state who become pregnant, it also presents the percentage of pregnant 15-19 year-olds who ultimately have an abortion.

The 8 states (plus Washington D.C.)--and 18 of the 22 states--in which teens have the highest rates of abortion, to be clear, voted for Clinton. Now, this stands in stark contrast to the states voting for Trump. The 19 states in which teens have the lowest rates of abortion--and 26 of the 28 states in which teens have the lowest rates of abortion--voted for Trump.

This is significant. Clinton received 38.9 pct. or more of the head-to-head vote in the 32 states with the highest abortion rates, but less than 38.9 pct. in 13 of the 18 states with the lowest abortion rates.


The thought occurs, then, that this is a central issue of the cultural divide: the role of women in society.

Blue/Clinton states view teenage pregnancy as the mistake of a young person, who needs understanding and or psychological help, with the option of having an abortion, while red/Trump states view it as a mistake for which one must take responsibility and face the consequences. 


Q. This led me, then, to look at this list showing the median age for first marriages by men, and this list showing the median age for first marriages by women. I then added them together.

Unsurprisingly, the 19 states in which men and women get married for the first time at the youngest age voted for Trump. This stands in stark contrast to the states voting for Clinton. The 8 states (plus Washington D.C.)--and 12 of the 14 states (plus Washington D.C.)--in which men and women get married for the first time at the oldest age voted for Clinton.


R.
Now, this raises another question. Since red state women both get pregnant at an earlier age and get married at an earlier age than their blue state cousins, we should see if this leads to them having a higher fertility rate--that is, more children over the course of their life span. This list provides the answer.


The 8 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the lowest fertility rate--and 17 of the 21 states with the lowest fertility rate--voted for Clinton, while the 12 states with the highest fertility rate--and 26 of the 29 states with the highest fertility rate--voted for Trump.


S. So what are the societal ramifications of red state women getting married at an earlier age, and having more babies, than their blue state cousins? Do these marriages last? This list presents the percentage of divorced men and women by state.

12 of the 18 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the lowest percentage of divorced men and women voted for Clinton, while 12 of the 14 states with the highest percentage of divorced men and women voted for Trump.

Well, what about the men?

T. This list presents the states in order of their attitude towards women.

Tellingly, Clinton won 14 of the 20 states in which women received the fairest treatment, but only 6 of the remaining 30.

And then, there is this list. It presents the rape rate per 100,000 residents by state.

Clinton won 7 of the 8 states with the lowest rape rate, and Trump won 11 of the 13 states with the highest rate rape.

Now, this is a chicken-or-the-egg type situation...

Does becoming a provider at an earlier age--and for more children over the course of their life span--than their blue state cousins, affect red state men's attitudes towards women?

Or is it instead just a matter of red state culture being patriarchal in nature, whereby men (and women) are raised to believe men are superior to women, and within their rights to dominate them?

And how does this red state lifestyle--of having children and getting married at an earlier age--impact the work force?


U. The percentage of high school graduates who fail to get a higher education can be extrapolated from this chart.

The 13 states with the highest percentage of high school graduates who fail to get a higher education--and 20 of the 22 states with the highest such percentage--voted for Trump, while the 10 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the highest percentage of high school graduates who go on to get a higher education voted for Clinton.

And how does this red state culture in which women get married at an earlier age, have more kids, and receive less education than their blue state counterparts, impact these women once they enter the workforce?

This list presents the states in order of the wage gap between men and women.

While 17 of the 24 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the smallest wage gap voted for Clinton, 23 of the 26 states with the largest wage gap voted for Trump.


V.  The thought occurs, moreover, that all these metrics feed into and off of each other. A moment ago we observed that red state prisons have much higher incarceration rates in comparison to the level of violent crime within their state than blue state prisons. And we have just observed that red state high school graduates fail to pursue higher education at the rates of blue state high school graduates. Well, perhaps there's a connection.

This list presents the number of lawyers per capita, by state.

The 7 states (plus Washington D.C.)--and 10 of the 12 states (plus Washington D.C.)--with the largest number of lawyers per capita voted for Clinton, while the 7 states--and 21 of the 27 states--with the smallest number of lawyers per capita voted for Trump.

Now, does having fewer lawyers per capita in red states factor into their higher incarceration levels? That would be hard to prove. But it is something worth looking at.

As is this...

W. This list presents the total environmental release of toxic waste per capita per year by state. 

The 12 states (plus Washington D.C.) releasing the least amount of toxic waste per capita voted for Clinton. Meanwhile, 25 of the 26 states releasing the most toxic waste per capita voted for Trump.

Now, this could be related to these states having fewer lawyers per capita. Or it could be the other way around--that these states have fewer environmental lawyers et al because the residents of these states don't really care all that much about toxic waste, as they are just not all that interested in protecting the environment, or conserving resources for future generations.


X. This list reveals the energy consumption per capita, in million Btu, by state.

11 of the 13 states with the lowest energy consumption per capita voted for Clinton, while the 17 states with the highest energy consumption per capita--not to mention 22 of the 24 states with the highest energy consumption per capita--voted for Trump.

Hmmm... Are the residents of red states more wasteful than their blue state cousins? More slothful?

Or are they just too preoccupied with their own problems?

Y. Now prepare to get mad. This chart presents the percentage of obese people per state.

13 of the 15 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the smallest percentage of obese people voted for Clinton, while the 17 states--and 21 of the 22 states--with the largest percentage of obese people voted for Trump.

It felt a little mean-spirited for me to embrace this chart, however. So I decided to look at another chart reporting on obesity by state, and add the two together.

It didn't help much. 13 of the 15 states with the smallest percentage of obese people still voted for Clinton, while the 11 states with the largest percentage of obese people--and 23 of the 26 states with the largest percentage of obese people--still voted for Trump.

When I compared this list to the two previous lists--for states that 1) used (and presumably wasted) the most energy per capita, and 2) released the most toxic waste into the environment per capita, moreover, I came to a startling realization. 16 states ranked lower than average on all three lists--that is, the residents of these states were more obese than average, used more energy than average, and released more toxic waste than average...and all 16 voted for Trump.

That's more than half the states he carried, mind you. These 16 states were, from top to bottom, based on their combined rankings for energy use, toxic waste release, and obesity: MO, OH, ID, SC, TX, AR, TN, NE, IN, IA, KY, MS, ND, AL, WV, and LA. These states accounted for more than half of Trump's electoral votes as well.

I later came across this list of the most obese county for each state, and compared this to how these counties voted.

The results were fairly surprising.

Here's a list of the most obese county in each state, in order of the most obese and whitest (The first number is the obesity rate for the county (O), the second number is the pct. of whites in the county (W), then comes the name of the county, and then finally comes the pct. for Clinton by state and then county, with the county percentage in parentheses.)


Blue states where the fattest county trended blue in comparison to the state as a whole (Clinton wins 2 of 2)
NM (35.1 O 16.39 W, McKinley) 54.7 (70.3), VA (41.4 O 18.5 W, Petersburg City) 52.9 (88.2),

Blue states where the fattest county trended red in comparison to the state as a whole (Clinton wins 5 of 18)
HI (22.7 O 34.5 W, Hawaii) 67.5 (65.3), MD (42.2 O 53.5 W, Somerset) 63.8 (42.2), NJ (34.5 O 62.74 W, Cumberland) 57.3 (53.3), CA (32.6 O 65.6 W, Stanislaus) 66.1 (52.0), DE (32.8 O 67.8 W, Kent) 56.0 (47.8), CO (27.6 O 87.28 W, Kit Carson) 52.7 (18.5), MA (28.3 O 88.4 W, Bristol) 64.5 (55.5), NV (31.5 O 85.9 W, Nye) 51.3 (29.1), CT (29.6 O 89.6 W, Windham) 57.2 (46.6), OR (34.5 O 85.9 W, Polk) 56.2 (47.4), WA (36.9 O 84.9 W, Gray's Harbor) 58.8 (47.2), RI (28.8 O 93.4 W, Kent) 58.3 (50.1), VT (29.8 O NA app 94, W, Essex) 65.2 (42.0), NH (31.3 O 96.6 W, Belknap) 50.2 (41.6), MN (36.2 O 91.9 W, Pine) 50.8 (36.9), IL (37.0 O 93.7 W, Adams) 59.0 (28.2), NY (33.7 O 98.17 W, Lewis) 61.3 (30.8), ME (35.0 O 97.1 W, Somerset) 51.5 (38.7), 


Well, there it is. We already have our story. The fattest county in 18 of the 20 states voting for Clinton offered her less support than the state as a whole, with the only exceptions coming in counties that were less than 20% non-Hispanic white.

This suggests a correlation between obesity and Trump voters.

Now comes the surprising part...

Red states where the fattest county trended blue in comparison to the state as a whole (Clinton wins 11 of 14)
SD (42.9 O 4.51 W, Oglala Lakota) 34.0 (88.0), WI (42.5 O 11.57 W, Menominee) 49.6 (78.8), AZ (35.2 O 19.50 W, Apache) 48.1 (68.6), GA (38.0 O 18.9 W, Clayton) 47.4 (86.2), MS (47.6 O 15.18 W, Claiborne) 40.8 (85.8), AL (46.3 O 19.09 W Greene) 35.6 (81.9), ND (41.4 O 25.12 W, Rolette) 30.2 (60.5), MT (38.8 O 36.60 W, Big Horn) 38.9 (51.9), SC (44.3 O 35.03 W, Lee) 42.6 (64.3), NC (40.8 O 40.06 W, Edgecombe) 48.1 (66.1), AR (45.5 O 39.25 W, Phillips) 35.8 (62.5), NE (41.8 O 46.77 W, Thurston) 36.4 (46.6), AK (39.7 O 52.54 W, Bristol Bay) 41.6 (App. 41.6), LA (42.1 O 51.79 W, East Feliciana) 39.8 (43.0),


Well, surprise, surprise... It turns out that some of the fattest counties in the fattest states are heavily minority counties--mostly African-American or native American.

Now, note that 11 of these counties are less than 45% white, and that all of them voted for Clinton.... And that 3 of these counties are more than 45% white--and that all of them voted for Trump.

Now, let's continue...

Red states where the fattest county trended red in comparison to the state as a whole (Clinton wins 0 of 16)
KS (38.6 O 65.44 W, Seward) 38.8 (33.1), MI (38.9 O 70.5 W, Saginaw) 49.9 (49.4), TX (37.5 O 75.1 W, Angelina) 45.2 (26.1), ID (34.2 O 80.2 W, Minidoka) 31.7 (20.4), FL (39.6 O 76.41 W, Liberty) 49.4 (21.4), UT (33.5 O 91.77 W, Box Elder) 37.7 (26.4), WY (34.3 O 93.2 W, Campbell) 24.3 (7.8), MO (37.6 O 90.03 W, Saline) 39.9 (32.1), TN (38.6 O 92.22 W, McNairy) 36.4 (19.6), WV (42.1 O 89.1 W, McDowell) 27.9 (23.2), PA (38.5 O 93.3 W, Fayette) 49.6 (34.7), OH (38.8 O 95.9 W, Lawrence) 45.8 (28.1), IN (38.2 O 97.3 W, Lawrence) 40.0 (23.9), IA (37.8 O 98.44 W, Union) 44.9 (35.8), OK (40.6 O 95.8 W, Washita) 30.7 (13.6), KY (43.2 O 97.18 W Leslie) 34.3 (8.9),

So...let's sum up. The fattest county in the 20 states voting for Clinton voted for Trump in greater numbers than their state as a whole 18 times, with the only two counties voting for Clinton in greater numbers than the state as a whole being counties that were less than 20% white.

This trend continued in the states voting for Trump, moreover... In 11 of these states, the fattest county was less than 45% white. All of these voted for Clinton. The other 19 counties??? The fattest counties for their state, that also happened to be more than 45% white??? They all voted for Trump. 


It appears, then, that obesity, at the very least, is a characteristic more common to Trump's supporters than Clinton's supporters.

There's also this.

Here is a breakdown of the pct. of whites for the 16 states skewing towards Clinton.

13 counties in which Clinton received a higher percentage of the vote than she received in the state as a whole...and also more votes than Trump:
4.51, 11.57, 15.18, 16.39, 18.5, 18.9, 19.09, 19.5, 25.12, 35.03, 36.6, 39.25, 40.06, 

3 counties in which Clinton received a higher percentage of the vote than she received in the state as a whole...but still received fewer votes than Trump:
46.77, 51.79, 52.54,

And here is a breakdown of the pct. of whites for the 29 states skewing towards Trump.

29 counties in which Trump received a higher percentage of the vote than he received in the state as a whole...and also more votes than Clinton:
53.5, 65.44, 67.8, 70.5, 75.1, 76.41, 80.2, 85.9, 84.9, 85.9, 87.28, 89.1, 89.6, 90.03, 91.77, 91.9, 92.22, 93.2, 93.3, 93.7, 94, 95.8, 95.9, 96.6, 97.1, 97.18, 97.3, 98.17, 98.44

Wow! There's nothing subtle about that, is there? It's a pattern with 100% conformity. Every county that was less than 45% white voted for Clinton. Every county that was more than 45% white voted for Trump.

This leaves but five states.

5 counties in which Trump received a higher percentage of of the vote than he received in the state as a whole...but still received fewer votes than Clinton.
34.5 (HI), 62.7 (NJ), 65.6 (CA), 88.4 (MA), 93.4 (RI)

Well, okay. Four majority white counties deemed most obese of their state nevertheless voted for Clinton. These were all in blue states--California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island...

These counties, for that matter, fit the overall pattern of the election-- where white people voted for Trump in record numbers. All five of these counties were whiter than their state as a whole. Hawaii--most obese county 34.5% white, state as a whole 23.8% white. New Jersey--most obese county 62.7% white, state as a whole 57.9% white. California--most obese county 65.6 white, state as a whole 39.2% white. Massachusetts-- most obese county 88.4% white, state as a whole 75.3% white. Rhode Island--most obese county 93.4% white, state as a whole 75.4% white.

It shouldn't come as a surprise, then, that these counties voted for Trump in higher numbers than the rest of their respective states.

So, let's return to the topic at hand: obesity. Hillary Clinton won a majority of the popular vote, head to head against Donald Trump, even though the voting ranks were 69% non-Hispanic white. She won, to be precise, 17 of the 46 states which have a non-Hispanic white population of over 45%. It has to be considered surprising, then, that she should win but 4 of the 36 counties deemed most obese in which the non-Hispanic white population exceeded 45%.

But let's not stop there. She also won 10 of the 29 states that were more than 69% white. There were 28 counties deemed the most obese of their state that were more than 69% white. She won but 2 of them.

It seems clear, then, that Trump was more popular with obese people, in all parts of the country, than he was with their less obese cousins.

And that Trump's white supporters are fatter than Clinton's white supporters...

But let's take one last look at this. Here are the states broken down into four categories. Inside the parentheses are the rankings of the state, from thinnest to fattest, and then from least white to most white. This is then followed by the pct. of the vote received by Clinton head to head against Trump.

15 states were thinner than average and less white than average. Clinton won 12 of these 15 (80%).
HI (2,1) 67.5, CA (4,2) 66.1,
NY (7,10) 61.3, NV (15,5) 51.3, NJ (10,12) 57.3, NM (19,3) 54.7, CO (1,22) 52.7, FL (16,8) 49.4, MD (20,6) 63.8, AZ (17,9) 48.1, CT (9,23) 57.2, WA (14,24) 58.8, VA (22,16) 52.9, AK (25,15) 41.6, DE (23,18) 56.0

10 states were fatter than average and less white than average. Clinton won but 1 of these 10 (10%).
GA (32,7) 47.4, TX (40,4) 45.2, IL (33,14) 59.0, NC (29,19) 48.1, SC (38,17) 42.6, MS (47,11) 40.8, LA (50,13) 39.8, OK (43,20) 30.7, AL (48,20) 35.6, AR (45,25) 35.8

Note that Clinton's winning percentage dropped from 80% to 10% as the states got fatter.

10 states were thinner than average and whiter than average. Clinton won 5 of these 10 (50%).
MA (5,27) 64.5, RI (11,28) 58.3, UT (6,33) 37.7, MT (3,44) 38.9, MN (12,38) 50.8, VT (8,50) 65.2, ID (18,40) 31.7, OH (24,39) 45.8, NH (13,48) 50.2, WY (21,42) 24.3

15 states were fatter than average and whiter than average. Clinton won but 2 of these 15 (13.3%)
OR (28,30) 56.2, PA (27,31) 49.6,
MI (35,32) 49.9, TN (42,26) 36.4, WI (31,39) 49.6, SD (30,41) 34.0, IN (36,36) 40.0, KS (44,29) 38.8, NE (37,37) 36.4, MO (41,34) 39.9, ME (26,50) 51.5, ND (34,46) 30.2, IA (39,45) 44.9, KY (46,43) 34.3, WV (49,48) 27.9

Note that Clinton's winning percentage dropped from 50% to 13.3% as the states got fatter.

Note also that Clinton won 17 of the 25 states that were thinner than average, but only 13 of the 25 states that were less white than average.

Well, think about it. This suggests that obesity was a bigger factor in the election than race.

Z. Having gone there--against my better judgement, mind you--and demonstrating the probability Trump voters are both whiter than Clinton voters, and fatter than Clinton voters, let's take one last look at their appearance...their teeth.

This website presents the number of dentists per 100,000 population, by state.

Well, yikes, this fits the pattern, now doesn't it?
11 of the 12 states (plus Washington D.C.) with the most dentists per capita voted for Clinton. Meanwhile, 12 of the 13 states with the fewest dentists per capita voted for Trump.

ZZ Bottom. So now, finally... I repeat--finally--let's look at a combined ranking of the states from least patriotic and All-American, to most patriotic and All-American, according to these three articles: one, two, and three.

1-10: RI (12) 58.3,
CA (17) 66.1, CT (18) 57.2, UT (28) 37.7, NJ (29) 57.3, NV (36) 51.3, OR (45) 56.2, MA (47) 64.5, MN (47) 50.8, NY (49) 61.3

11-20:
MI (49) 49.9, HI (53) 67.5, NM (57) 54.7, AZ (58) 48.1, ND (58) 30.2, VT (62) 65.2, IL (67) 59.0, IN (69) 40.0, LA (70) 39.8, NE (70) 36.4

21-25: KS (71) 38.8, PA (72) 49.6, TX (73) 45.2, AR (75) 35.8, MD (77) 63.8

26-30:
ID (79) 31.7, NH (80) 50.2, DE (81) 56.0, TN (83) 36.4, WA (86) 58.8

31-40:
WI (87) 49.6, FL (88) 49.4, MS (91) 40.8, IA (92) 44.9, KY (93) 34.3, WV (94) 27.9, CO (100) 52.7, ME (101) 51.5, AK (102) 41.6, MO (105) 39.9

41-50:
OH (108) 45.8, VA (110) 52.9, NC (110) 48.1, OK (110) 30.7, WY (110) 24.3, MT (113) 38.9, SD (114) 34.0, GA (115) 47.4, AL (132) 35.6, SC (133) 42.6


Now, that's something Trump supporters can rally around. 10 of the 12 states deemed least patriotic voted for Clinton, and 17 of the 20 states deemed most patriotic voted for Trump.

But look again. Things are upside down. South Carolina--the state which in 1860 led the battle charge to leave the Union, which continued to fly the Confederate flag over its state capitol until recent times--is regarded as the most patriotic state.

(Cut to the sound of Abe Lincoln rolling over in his tomb.)
  

Total of Rankings A - Z (Lifestyle)

So now let's add up the previous lists, in which the states were sorted on the basis of a variety of factors, including the percentage of teenagers smoking marijuana, the number of painkiller prescriptions, pick-up truck ownership, gun ownership, the preference of beer over wine, the preference of dogs over cats, addiction to cigarettes, obesity, the likelihood of a teenage pregnancy being terminated, the prevalence of gonorrhea, the median age at first marriage, the number of children per mother, the number of divorced residents, the wage gap between men and women, the percentage of LGBT adults, the amount of toxic waste disposed in the state per capita, and the outward appearance of patriotism, to see how they line up with the election results.

The total rankings on these lists are added up below, followed by the percentage at which they voted for Clinton against Trump.

1-10: MA (331) 64.5, NY (358.5) 61.3, CA (386.5) 66.1, NJ (416) 57.3, CT (434.5) 57.2, RI (443) 58.3, DC (415, 2 NA) 90.9, HI (494.5) 67.5, MD (498) 63.8, VT (501) 65.2,
Avg. for the top ten

11-20: NH (545.5) 50.2, WA (635.5) 58.8, MN (644) 50.8, IL (667.5) 59.0, FL (667.5) 49.4, OR (675.5) 56.2, CO (739) 52.7, DE (750) 56.0, ME (752) 51.5, PA (765.5) 49.6,
Avg. for the second ten

21-25: VA (794.5) 52.9, MI (810.5) 49.9, WI (832) 49.6, AZ (850) 48.1,
NV (898.5) 51.3,

26-30:
NC (905) 48.1, OH (958.5) 45.8, UT (972.5) 37.7, NE (983) 36.4, GA (999.5) 47.4, 
Avg. for the third ten
 
31-40:
IN (1002.5) 40.0, NM (1009.5) 54.7, MO (1022.5) 39.9, KS (1037) 38.8, AK (1008.5) 41.6,  IA (1041.5) 44.9, ID (1038.5) 31.7, SC (1083) 42.6, TX (1083.5) 45.2, TN (1090.5) 36.4, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

41-51: ND (1096.5) 30.2, SD (1113.5) 34.0, MT (1109.5) 38.9, WV (1153.5) 27.9, WY (1154.5) 24.3, KY (1154) 34.3, AL (1216.5) 35.6, LA (1238) 39.8, OK (1246) 30.7, AR (1263.5) 35.8, MS (1327.5) 40.8,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


So, there it is. The cultural divide. The 13 least (and 17 of the 18 least, plus Washington D.C.) painkiller-popping, pick-up truck owning, gun-owning, beer-loving, cigarette smoking, dog-loving, obese, STD-infected, divorced, toxic-waste dumping, and patriotic states (plus Washington D.C.) voted for Clinton, while 24 of the 25 (and 29 of the 32) most all those things voted for Trump.

Let's recall. We looked at unemployment rates, poverty rates, crime rates, and economic success, etc, but none of these factors were as clear an indicator of a states' voting for Trump as the state's rates for obesity, preference for beer, addiction to nicotine, addiction to opioid pain-killers, and gun ownership. Trump nailed it with his slogan. Make America Great Again. Apparently, his supporters believed their best days were behind them, not just economically, but physically. Perhaps, then, this wasn't an election over issues, as much as it was about fear of the future. A big white chunk of the country realized their best days were behind them, and a new wave of immigrants was on the rise, and it scared them. They saw a rainbow coalition in the President's cabinet, and among the Democratic leaders. And it scared them. They eat too much and drink too much, and have gotten fat and frightened. But mostly they resent being told they're wrong for wishing everything could go back to how it used to be...back to the good old days...when rich white men ruled the country...and over-educated women and brown people knew their place.

Or is that unfair...

Absent from my analysis of the cultural divide from A-Z was a thorough dissection of the values and attitudes of the two cultures. We looked at the divergent attitudes towards women, and crime, but failed to look at how they viewed other aspects of the world, and life itself.


Perhaps a comparative analysis of the ideas and core beliefs of the cultures, then, will explain why Florida and Pennsylvania (which have the lifestyle of blue states) voted for Trump, and Nevada and New Mexico (which have the lifestyle of
red states) voted for Clinton.

So stay in your seats my fellow travelers. Our journey isn't over.


Finding #13: At the heart of the culture war are conflicting ideologies, whose proponents are no longer content to compromise.

Let's refine our search, then, to metrics regarding how people think, and interact with their world.

The Election And the Bubble

A. Let's get started by looking at this list presenting the percentage of the population self-identifying as conservative or liberal. And then let's add this to the plus/minus for conservatives over liberals from this map.

Well, these combined totals are quite a revelation. Only 5 states self-identified as liberal. These 5 states--and the 14 least conservative states--voted for Clinton. The next three least conservative states voted for Trump, but gave Clinton over 49% of the vote. These three states were then followed by Virginia, the most conservative state to vote for Clinton, but a state largely reliant upon the Federal Government. The 27 most conservative states voted for Trump.

Now, this is quite a slap in the face for those thinking the economy was the key to the election--and that otherwise liberal or Democratic-leaning states voted for Trump because Clinton didn't speak to their pain. These states were largely conservative to begin with. Instead of accepting the accepted wis-dumb Clinton blew it by losing in states such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Florida, then, those analyzing the election might be better off figuring out how it was she won in Minnesota, Maine, and Virginia, when those states so strongly identify a conservative.

B. But...what's a conservative? Is it someone who believes in "limited government", as evidenced by a lack of regulations? Here are the states ranked by "freedom" (from regulation), from the least "free" to the most "free", based upon the amount of statewide regulations, according to this article on the Cato Institute website.

The 9 least--and 12 of the 14 least--free states (plus Washington. D.C.) voted for Clinton, while 24 of the 28 most "free" states voted for Trump.


C. Well, okay. That's what it means to be an economic "conservative. " But what about "social conservatives? Let's look then at the percentages for people claiming they are "highly religious" or "very religious" ( on this list and this list) and then add in the pct. of those saying they were "absolutely certain" in their belief in God, minus the pct. of those saying they don't believe in God, from this list.

This new list follows, from the state with the lowest percentage of "highly religious" and 'very religious" citizens to the state with the highest percentage.


1-10: VT (34 + 22 + 20 = 76) 65.2, NH (33 + 24 + 25 = 82) 50.2, MA (33 + 28 + 22 = 83) 64.5, ME (34 + 27 + 32 = 93) 51.5, CT (43 + 32  + 42 = 117) 57.2, WA (45 + 32 + 45 = 122) 58.8,  OR (48 + 31 + 44 = 123) 56.2, CA (49 + 34 + 42 = 125) 66.1, DC (53 + 32 + 41 = 126) 90.9, NY (46 + 34 + 46 = 126) 61.3, 

11-20: CO (47 + 35 + 45 = 127) 52.7, NV (49 + 32 + 47 = 128) 51.3, WI (45 + 38 + 46 = 129) 49.6, AK (45 + 38 + 46 = 129) 41.6, HI (47 + 32 + 53 = 132) 67.5, RI (49 + 34 + 49 = 132) 58.3, MN (49 + 42 + 47 = 138) 50.8,  IL (51 + 39 + 50 = 142) 59.0, DE (52 + 36 + 54 = 142) 56.0, MT (48 + 38 + 56 = 142) 38.9,

21-25: NJ (55 + 36 + 52 = 143) 57.3, PA (53 + 41 + 51 = 145) 49.6, MD (54 + 39 + 54 = 147) 63.8, AZ (53 + 42 + 52 = 147) 48.1, MI (53 + 41 + 54 = 148) 49.9,

26-30: ID (51 + 47 + 51 = 149) 31.7, NM (57 + 41 + 52 = 150) 54.7, FL (54 + 42 + 54 = 150) 49.4, WY (54 + 36 + 60 = 150) 24.3, IN (54 + 46 + 53 = 153) 40.0,

31-40: IA (55 + 43 + 57 = 155) 44.9, NE (54 + 47 + 57 = 158) 36.4, OH (58 + 41 + 60 = 159) 45.8, KS (55 + 47 + 59 = 161) 38.8, VA (61 + 44 + 57 = 162) 52.9, ND (53 + 46 + 64 = 163) 30.2, MO (60 + 44 + 62 = 166) 39.9, SD (59 + 46 + 62 = 167) 34.0, TX (64 + 48 + 63 = 175) 45.2, UT (64 + 60 + 53 = 177) 37.7,

41-51: OK (66 + 49 + 65 = 180) 30.7, NC (65 + 50 + 66 = 181) 48.1, KY (65 + 49 + 67 = 181) 34.3, WV (69 + 42 + 72 = 183) 27.9, GA (66 + 52 + 68 = 186) 47.4, SC (70 + 54 + 69 = 193) 42.6, AR (70 + 51 + 73 = 194) 35.8, LA (71 + 56 + 69 = 196) 39.8, TN (73 + 54 + 75 = 202) 36.4, AL (77 + 57 + 80 = 214) 35.6, MS (77 + 61 + 78 = 216) 40.8,

The 12 least, and 19 of the 23 least, religious states voted for Clinton. The 16 most--and 23 of the 24 most--religious states voted for Trump.

There's also this: 3 of the 6 least religious states voting for Trump were within one point of voting for Clinton.

Holy crap. (Pardon my French.) The cultural divide might better be defined as a religious divide. Those voting for the three-times married and three times an adulterer Donald Trump apparently believed he was more "religious" and "Christian" than Hillary Clinton, a life-time church-goer who stuck to her vows and stood by her man when her husband's adultery became public.

That the admitted "pussy-grabber" Donald Trump was nonetheless the chosen candidate for holy rollers, and Clinton the candidate for the spiritually independent, is supported, moreover, by the exit polls. These revealed that those responding "none" when asked their religion voted for Clinton by the surprising margin of 67-25.

 
D. Still, what matters more than one's being religious (or not) is if and how one's being religious (or not) affects how one thinks about his fellow man. This study reflects the "Belief in absolute standards for right and wrong among adults" by state. By deducting the percentage of those believing "there are clear standards for what is right and wrong" from the percentage of those believing "Right or wrong depends on the situation" one can approximate the level of zealotry within the state. When one looks at the "Sources of guidance on right and wrong among adults", moreover, one can deduct those most seeking guidance from their religion from those most seeking guidance from a philosophy or from science, and approximate the level of religiosity. One can then add the numbers for zealotry and religiosity together and approximate the level of "Free-thinking" within each state, with the lowest combined score for zealotry and religiosity being the most "free-thinking". (In most of the states the reliance on religion was greater than the reliance on reason or science; as a result, most of the second numbers are subtracted rather than added.)

Here are the results, from most least reliant upon religious doctrine to most reliant upon religious doctrine.


1-10: MA (48 + 13 = 61) 64.5, DC (53 + 0 = 53) 90.9, VT (42 + 10 = 52) 65.2, HI (44 + 0 = 44) 67.5, NY (46 - 2 = 44) 61.3, CT (37 + 6 = 43) 57.2, NH (34 + 9 = 43) 50.2, NJ (42 - 6 = 36) 57.3, ME (41 - 5 = 36) 51.5, CA (39 - 4 = 35) 66.1,

11-20: NV (38 - 5 = 33) 51.3,
IL (38 - 6 = 32) 59.0, MN (35 - 5 = 30) 50.8, WA (31 - 3 = 28) 58.8, WI (38 - 12 = 26) 49.6, MD (38 - 13 = 25) 63.8, DE (38 - 14 = 24) 56.0, RI (28 - 6 = 22) 58.3, OR (28 - 6 = 22) 56.2, FL (34 - 12 = 22) 49.4,

21-25: OH (34 - 16 = 18) 45.8, AK (26 - 8 = 18) 41.6, CO (22 - 5 = 17) 52.7, IA (35 - 19 = 16) 44.9, ND (25 - 14 = 11) 30.2,

26-30: OK (33 - 20 = 13) 30.7, MI (26 - 16 = 10) 49.9, IN (28 - 19 = 9) 40.0, NM (26 - 20 = 6) 54.7, VA (25 - 19 = 6) 52.9,

31-40:
PA (21 - 15 = 6) 49.6, AZ (19 - 13 = 6) 48.1, MO (26 - 20 = 6) 39.9, MT (14 - 8 = 6) 38.9, TX (28 - 23 = 5) 45.2, NE (21 - 16 = 5) 36.4, SD (21 - 16 = 5) 34.0, KS (26 - 22 = 4) 38.8, NC (26 - 24 = 2) 48.1, ID (15 - 18 = -3) 31.7,

41-51:
KY (22 - 26 = -4) 34.3, WY (14 - 19 = -5) 24.3, GA (22 - 29 = -7) 47.4, UT (20 - 27 = -7) 37.7, LA (21 - 29  = -8) 39.8, SC (21 - 33 = -12) 42.6, MS (22 - 35 = -13) 40.8, AR (20 - 36 = -16) 35.8, TN (17 - 34 = -17) 36.4, AL (12 - 42 = -30) 35.6, WV (10 - 43 = -33) 27.9,

The 13 most, and 17 of the 18 most, free-thinking states (plus Washington D.C.) voted for Clinton, and the 21 least, and 29 of the 32 least, free-thinking states voted for Trump.

It remains to be determined, of course, if those thinking freely think different. (I'm using an Apple Computer. It won't let me write "think differently", try as I might.)


E. There's a flip-side to this, as well. Are those more willing or prone to think different, more accepting of others who think different? Here, then, is a ranking of the states by their relative levels of Tolerance. (Three factors were studied. The prevalence of people of the belief ALL abortions should be illegal, the prevalence of people STRONGLY OPPOSED to same sex marriage, and the prevalence of people thinking immigrants are a burden on society (times .5). These numbers were then added up. The final number on this list, as on so many others, is the pct. of the 2016 vote going for Clinton as opposed to Trump.) 

1-10: NH (29.5) 50.2, MA (35) 64.5, OR (35.5) 56.2, RI (38) 58.3, NJ (38.5) 57.3, CT (40.5) 57.2, CO (41) 52.7, NY (41.5) 61.3, WA (42) 58.8, CA (43) 66.1,

11-20: HI (43.5) 67.5, NV (43.5) 51.3, DE (44) 56.0, VT (45) 65.2, MD (47.5) 63.8, MN (47.5) 50.8, IL (48.5) 59.0, AK (48.5) 41.6, AZ (50) 48.1, UT (50) 37.7,

21-25:
WI (51) 49.6, ME (52.5) 51.5, MI (52.5) 49.9, FL (53) 49.4, ID (53) 31.7,

26-30:
MT (54) 38.9, IA (54.5) 44.9, NM (55.5) 54.7, PA (55.5) 49.6, KS (56.5) 38.8,

31-40: VA (57.5) 52.9, OH (58) 45.8, TX (59) 45.2, GA (59.5) 47.4, MO (60.5) 39.9, NE (61.5) 36.4, WY (61.5 approx) 24.3, NC (65) 48.1, LA (65.5) 39.8, SD (67) 34.0,

41-50: ND (67) 30.2, OK (68) 30.7, IN (68.5) 40.0, SC (72) 42.6, AR (74.5) 35.8 TN (76.5) 36.4, KY (80.5) 34.3, MS (83) 40.8, AL (84) 35.6, WV (85) 27.9


The 17 most tolerant states by this metric voted for Clinton. The19 least tolerant states by this metric voted for Trump..

I later compared this list to the rankings of an online list on tolerance.

Well, heck, even the Daily Beast has concluded the nineteen least tolerant states voted for Trump.

As there was a wide gap in the results between my list and the Beast's list, I decided to average them out. Here are the states presented in order of the rankings on the two lists when combined.

1-10: NH (10) 50.2, NJ (13) 57.3, HI (16) 67.5, CA (16) 66.1, MD (17) 63.8, MA (20) 64.5, IL (20) 59.0, CT (20) 57.2, WI (22) 49.6, MN (23) 50.8,

11-20: NY (25) 61.3,
RI (26) 58.3, OR (29) 56.2, NV (32) 51.3, WA (33) 58.8, PA (33) 49.6, CO (38) 52.7, NM (38) 54.7, VT (39) 65.2, FL (39) 49.4,

21-25:
IA (39) 44.9, DE (41) 56.0,  AK (41) 41.6, VA (42) 52.9, MT (47) 38.9,

26-30: ME (49) 51.5,
NC (51) 48.1, MI (53) 49.9, LA (55) 39.8, AZ (62) 48.1,

31-40: TX (62) 45.2, UT (64) 37.7, GA (66) 47.4, WV (69) 27.9, ID (70) 31.7, MO (72) 39.9, IN (76) 40.0, OK (77) 30.7, OH (78) 45.8, KS (78) 38.8,

41-50:
SD (79) 34.0, SC (80) 42.6, TN (80) 36.4, NE (83) 36.4, ND (83) 30.2, MS (86) 40.8, WY (87) 24.3, KY (88) 34.3, AL (89) 35.6, AR (94) 35.8

While my list had the 17 most tolerant states voting for Clinton, this combined list has 17 of the 19 most tolerant states voting for Clinton. The bottom of the list is another story. While my list had the 19 least tolerant states voting for Trump, this combined list has the 24 least tolerant states voting for Trump.

There's also this: the 3 most tolerant states voting for Trump on this list all came within a point and a half of voting for Clinton.


F. All this thinking about tolerance--and ways to measure tolerance--quite naturally, led me to wonder if there was a relationship between cultural diversity and tolerance...that is, does familiarity breed contempt, or tolerance?

I consulted the cultural diversity metric created in Part 2 of this article.
 
1-10: CA (145.5) 66.1, DC (135.7) 90.9, HI (131.7) 67.5, TX (120.5) 45.2, NM (118.5) 54.7, NY (116.0) 61.3, NJ (112.6) 57.3, FL (108.6) 49.4, NV (107.5) 51.3, AZ (97.3) 48.1, 

11-20: IL (90.6) 59.0, MD (87.0) 63.8, GA (85.5) 47.4, MA (85.1) 64.5, CT (82.9) 57.2, RI (81.7) 58.3, VA (77.3) 52.9, DE (77.0) 56.0, WA (72.6) 58.8, NC (72.1) 48.1, 

21-25: LA (68.9) 39.8, CO (66.1) 52.7, OR (65.4) 56.2, MS (64.5) 40.8, SC (64.1) 42.6,

26-30: OK (62.1) 30.7, AL (58.9) 35.6, AK (57.0) 41.6, AR (54.7) 35.8, PA (53.3) 49.6,  

31-40: MI (53.2) 49.9, KS (53.2) 38.8, TN (51.9) 36.4, UT (49.8) 37.7, OH (47.5) 45.8, MN (47.3) 50.8, IN (47.2) 40.0, NE (45.0) 36.4, MO (44.7) 39.9, WI (40.9) 49.6, 


41-50: ID (40.7) 31.7, KY (40.5) 34.3, ME (36.8) 51.5, SD (36.6) 34.0, NH (36.1) 50.2, IA (35.0) 44.9, VT (34.8) 65.2, MT (25.6) 38.9, WY (26.1) 24.3, WV (23.5) 27.9, ND (19.6) 30.2,

I then compared this with the rankings of the states in the tolerance metric above.

As one might surmise there was a pattern...

17 states were more diverse than average and more tolerant than average. Clinton won 16 of these 17. (The first number in the parentheses is the diversity ranking. This is followed by the tolerance ranking. The number outside the parentheses is the pct. of the voting going for Clinton against Trump.)

OR (22-13) 56.2, MA (13-6) 64.5, CT (14-8) 57.2, MD (10-5) 63.8, NJ (6-2) 57.3, CO (21-17) 52.7, IL (10-7) 59.0, WA (18-15) 58.8, RI (15-12) 58.3, HI (2-3) 67.5, CA (1-4) 66.1, DE (17-22) 56.0, NY (5-11) 61.3, NV (8-14) 51.3, VA (16-24) 52.9, FL (7-20) 49.4, NM (4-18) 54.7
 

8 states were less diverse than average but more tolerant than average. Clinton won 3 of these 8.

NH (44-1) 50.2,
WI (39-9) 49.6, VT (46-19) 65.2, MN (35-10) 50.8, IA (45-21) 44.9, MT (47-25) 38.9, PA (29-16) 49.6,
AK (27-23, 3.1 + 9.3) 41.6

8 states were more diverse than average and less tolerant than average. Trump won all 8.

NC (19-27) 48.1, LA (20-29) 39.8, OK (25-38) 30.7, SC (24-42) 42.6, AZ (9-30) 48.1, GA (12-33) 47.4, MS (23-46) 40.8, TX (3-31) 45.2


17 states were less diverse than average and less tolerant than average. Trump won 16 of these 17 (with the only exception being Maine--which was not only the most tolerant of the bunch, but the most tolerant in comparison to its diversity).

ME (42-26) 51.5, WV (49-34) 27.9, ND (50-45) 30.2, ID (39-35) 31.7, MI (30-28) 49.9, MO (36-38) 39.9, SD (43-41) 34.0, WY (49-47) 24.3, UT (33-32) 37.7, IN (36-37) 40.0, OH (34-39) 45.8, NE (37-44) 36.4, KY (41-48) 34.3, KS (31-40) 38.8, TN (32-43) 36.4, AR (28-50) 35.8, AL (26-49) 35.6

Well, this is another "oh, crap" moment, isn't it? Of the 25 states more diverse than average, 17 were also more tolerant than average. All but one of these voted for Clinton. The other 8--states where a greater than average level of diversity sits uncomfortably side by side with a lesser than average tolerance for others? All voted for Trump. 

This strongly supports, then, what we've already discussed--that religion and nationalism played a major role in the election and that the economy's role in the election was greatly exaggerated. This is further supported, moreover, by exit polls, which showed that those claiming the economy was their main concern voted for Clinton, NOT Trump, by a margin of 52-41, and that Trump instead beat Clinton among those most concerned with terrorism 57-40, and immigration 64-33.
 
It should be noted, moreover, that the areas of the country most impacted by terrorism to date--New York, Massachusetts. Virginia, Maryland Washington D.C., Texas, California, and Florida, voted for Clinton in far greater numbers than the areas not as yet impacted, and that, similarly, the areas with the greatest number of immigrants also voted for Clinton in far greater numbers than those with the fewest.

Well, yikes. If accurate, these polls suggest that many of those voting for Trump did so not only out of fear, but out of irrational fear.

It's as if a politician campaigned by yelling "BOO!" And won.


G. Let's continue, then, exploring the possibility Trump supporters and Clinton supporters have divergent attitudes towards those unlike themselves.

Let's use this study to approximate each state's acceptance of the social contract. The results to two questions were added together. The first number reflects the pct. of respondents per state to claim government aid to the poor does more good than harm minus the pct. of respondents to claim it does more harm than good. The second number reflects the number of respondents believing the government should get bigger and offer more services minus the number who believe it should become smaller and cut services. (Most of the second numbers were negative. A subtraction of one thereby reflects that 1% more believed the government should become smaller than believed it should expand.)

1-10: DC (53 + 51 = 104) 90.9, NY (17 + 12 = 29) 61.3, VT (27 + 0 = 27) 65.2, CA (18 + 5 = 23) 66.1, NJ (16 + 5 = 21) 57.3, MA (17 - 1 = 16) 64.5, NM (10 + 5 = 15) 54.7, MD (14 - 3 = 11) 63.8, RI (17 - 6 = 11) 58.3, DE (8 - 3 = 5) 56.0,

11-20: CT (13 - 9 = 4) 57.2,
IL (10 - 8 = 2) 59.0, WA (16 - 15 = 1) 58.8, OR (17 - 16 = 1) 56.2, FL (3 - 2 = 1) 49.4, HI (7 - 8 = -1) 67.5, NC (6 - 9 = -3) 48.1, TX (-1 - 2 = -3) 45.2, CO (6 - 12 = -6) 52.7, GA (1 - 8 = -7) 47.4,

21-25:
SC (8 - 15 = -7) 42.6, AK (2 - 14 = -12) 41.6, MI (6 - 19 = -13) 49.9, NV (5 - 19 = -14) 51.3, MN (9 - 23 = -14) 50.8,

26-30:
IA (6 - 20 = -14) 44.9, AR (-1 - 14 = -15) 35.8, LA (-4 - 12  = -16) 39.8, ME (11 - 28 = -17) 51.5, NH (14 - 33 = -19) 50.2,

31-40:
TN (0 - 21 = -21) 36.4, VA (-5 - 17 = -22) 52.9, MS (-8 - 14 = -22) 40.8, PA (-2 - 21 = -23) 49.6, OH (0 - 24 = -24) 45.8, KY (-8 - 16 = -24) 34.3, WV (0 - 26 = -26) 27.9, AZ (-6 - 21 = -27) 48.1, WI (-2 - 26 = -28) 49.6, MO (-1- 28 = -29) 39.9,

41-51: OK (-4 - 25 = -29) 30.7, AL (-13 - 18 = -31) 35.6, KS (-3 - 35 = -38) 38.8, IN (-18 - 21 = -39) 40.0, ID (-3 - 36 = -39) 31.7, UT (-8 - 40 = -48) 37.7, SD (-7 - 41 = -48) 34.0, MT (-13 - 39 = -52) 38.9, NE (-13 - 39 = -52) 36.4, ND (-16 - 40 = -56) 30.2, WY (-29 - 51 = -80) 24.3,    


The 13 states (plus Washington D.C.) most accepting of the social contract voted for Clinton. The 19 states least accepting of the social contract voted for Trump.


H. So now let's see if this belief among Clinton supporters that government should help people in need extends to the environment. This survey relates the percentage of respondents claiming the cost of environmental protections and regulations was worth the cost in jobs and income vs. those claiming they were not. It is presumed to reflect the level of acceptance of responsibility to the planet.

1-10: DC (48) 90.9, VT (43) 65.2, HI (42) 67.5, WA (38) 58.8, RI (37) 58.3, NH (35) 50.2, NY (34) 61.3, MA (32) 64.5, MD (32) 63.8, NJ (32) 57.3, 

11-20: CT (32) 57.2, ME (28) 51.5, DE (27) 56.0, CA (26) 66.1, MN (25) 50.8, IA (25) 44.9, IL (21) 59.0, GA (21) 47.4, CO (20) 52.7, VA (20) 52.9

21-25:
WI (20) 49.6, TX (20) 45.2, FL (19) 49.4, OR (18) 56.2, MI (17) 49.9,

26-30: NC (17) 48.1, NM (16) 54.7, PA (16) 49.6, AZ (14) 48.1, AK (13) 41.6

31-40: NV (11) 51.3, OH (11) 45.8, KS (11) 38.8, NE (11) 36.4, OK (10) 30.7, SC (9) 42.6, UT (9) 37.7, ID (9) 31.7, IN (8) 40.0, MO (8) 39.9

41-50:
LA (8) 39.8, MS (4) 40.8, TN (4) 36.4, AR (2) 35.8, SD (2) 34.0, ND (1) 30.2, AL (-2) 35.6, KY (-3) 34.3, MT (-16) 38.9, WV (-17) 27.9, WY (-17) 24.3

Well, sad to say, this isn't surprising. The 14--and 17 of the 19--states (plus Washington D.C.) most supportive of environmental regulations voted for Clinton. The 20 states least supportive of environmental regulations voted for Trump.


I. So, now, let's look beyond how people interact with those less fortunate, and the environment, to see how they interact with things greater than themselves...

Here, then are the percentage of respondents per state "feeling spiritual peace and well-being" once a week or more, plus half the percentage of those feeling it once or twice a month, minus the percentage of those experiencing "a sense of wonder about the universe" once a week or more, plus half the percentage of those feeling it once or twice a month. Presumably, this will reveal the spiritual character of each state as to whether the spirituality of its citizens is inward-based vs outward based. Let's call this metric: self-centered-ness.
(These numbers come from the Pew Survey on religion.) 

1-10: MA (54 - 53.5 = 0.5) 64.5, VT (55 - 54 = 1) 65.2, NH (51.5 - 50 = 1.5) 50.2, WA (62 - 57 = 5) 58.8, OR (64.5 - 59.5 = 5) 56.2, NY (60 - 54.5 = 5.5) 61.3, AZ (66 - 60 = 6) 48.1, NV (69.5 - 63 = 6.5) 51.3, CO (62 - 55 = 7) 52.7, CT (58 - 50 = 8) 57.2

11-20: DC (61 - 53 = 8) 90.9, WY (63 - 55 = 8) 24.3, MT (63.5 - 55 = 8.5) 38.9, PA (63 - 53.5 = 9.5) 49.6, ME (57 - 47 = 10) 51.5, CA (64.5 - 54.5 = 10) 66.1, VA (67 - 56 = 11) 52.9, NM (68 - 57 = 11) 54.7, IL (63 - 51.5 = 11.5) 59.0, DE (59.5 - 47.5 = 12) 56.0

21-25:
WI (60 - 48 = 12) 49.6, HI (66 - 53.5 = 12.5) 67.5, AK (67 - 54.5 = 12.5) 41.6, UT (73 - 60.5 = 12.5) 37.7, IA (61 - 48 = 13) 44.9,

26-30: IN (65 - 52 = 13) 40.0, MN (65 - 51.5 = 13.5) 50.8, OH (65 - 51.5 = 13.5) 45.8, MO (66.5 - 53 = 13.5) 39.9, TX (69.5 - 56 = 13.5) 45.2

31-40: RI (63 - 49 = 14) 58.3,
MD (64 - 50 = 14) 63.8, ND (62.5 - 48 = 14.5) 30.2, MI (64 - 49.5 = 14.5) 49.9,  FL (68.5 - 53.5 = 15) 49.4, ID (69 - 54 = 15) 31.7, NJ (65.5 - 49 = 16.5) 57.3, NE (66.5 - 49 = 17.5) 36.4, KY (67 - 49.5 = 17.5) 34.3, KS (68 - 50.5 = 17.5) 38.8

41-51:
SD (71 - 53.5 = 17.5) 34.0, AR (70 - 52 = 18) 35.8, OK (70 - 52 = 18) 30.7, NC (73 - 54 = 19) 48.1, GA (72 - 54 = 18) 47.4, SC (73 - 54 = 19) 42.6, WV (74.5 - 55 = 19.5) 27.9, TN (76 - 55.5 = 20.5) 36.4, LA (71.5 - 49 = 22.5) 39.8, MS (76 - 51.5 = 24.5) 40.8, AL (76.5 - 47.5 = 29) 35.6


Well, this is interesting. 15 of the 19 least self-centered states (plus Washington D.C.) voted for Clinton, while the 14 most, and 26 of the 31, most self-centered states voted for Trump.

Let's see where this leads. The feeling of spiritual peace and well-being more prevalent among red state respondents can be summed up in one word: comfort. Perhaps, then, red state voters seek out comfort, and cherish comfort...while blue state voters seek out transcendence. Perhaps, then, the underlying emotional state--the state that guides the ship of state, so to speak--is fear, for the red states, and confusion, for the blue states.

If so, then, that helps explain why Trump's message--that the world is a fearful place from which the United States is in desperate need of protection--found such a receptive audience in red states, but fell upon deaf ears in blue states, even though they were much more at risk.


J. This realization, then, that Trump state voters are more self-centered/less interested in learning about the outside world, leads us to a related question: does this lack of interest translate to a lower rate of higher education? 

Let's look, then, at the election through the prism of higher education. This chart presenting the percentage of adults receiving bachelor's degrees, and advanced degrees, by state, based on information from the U.S. Census Bureau, was consulted. These percentages were then added together. The states are presented with the total in parentheses in order of highest combined total to lowest combined total, along with the percentage at which they voted for Clinton against Trump. A clear trend is obvious.

1-10: DC (95.7)NA 90.9, MA (54.6) 64.5, MD (53.3)63.8, CT (51.1) 57.2, CO (48.6) 52.7, VA (48.1) 52.9, NJ (47.4) 57.3, NY (46.4) 61.3, VT (46.4) 65.2, NH (43.2) 50.2

11-20: IL (42.3)59.0,
RI (42.2) 58.3, WA (42.1) 58.8, MN (41.8) 50.8, CA (40.6) 66.1, DE (40.1) 56.0, KS (39.7) 38.8, OR (39.6) 56.2, HI (39.5) 67.5, UT (37.6) 37.7

21-25: GA (37.4) 47.4, PA (36.6) 49.6, ME (36.5) 51.5, NE (36.2) 36.4, NM (35.7) 54.7

26-30:
MT (35.7) 38.9, AK (35.6) 41.6, NC (35.3) 48.1, AZ (34.9) 48.1, MO (34.7) 39.9

31-40:
FL (34.3) 49.4, WI (34.1) 49.6, MI (34.0) 49.9, TX (34.0) 45.2, OH (32.9) 45.8, SC (32.7) 42.6, IA (32.5) 44.9, ND (32.5) 30.2, SD (32.4) 34.0, WY (31.7) 24.3

41-50: ID (31.6) 31.7, TN (30.9) 36.4, IN (30.6) 40.0, OK (30.1) 30.7, AL (29.7) 35.6, KY (29.5) 34.3, NV (29.4) 51.3, LA (28.3) 39.8, MS (26.7) 40.8, AR (25.0) 35.8, WV (24.0) 27.9

Well, look at that. I think we found a key factor in the election. Clinton won the 15 most highly educated states (plus Washington D.C.). And 17 of the 18 most highly educated states (plus Washington D.C.). And 19 of the 24 most highly educated states (plus Washington D.C.). Well, we know what's coming then. Trump won 25 of the 26 least educated states and districts.

Note also that the percentage of votes for Clinton over Trump dropped alongside the percentage of state occupants receiving a higher education.

It doesn't get much clearer than that.

So, yes, unbelievably, there's a clear correlation between having (or being around those having) an upper education and voting for Clinton, or, conversely, lacking (or being around those lacking) an upper education and voting for Trump!

I later compared the last list with this list, this list, and this list.

I then created a new list from the combined rankings on the four lists.


1-10: MA (5) 64.5, VA (20) 52.9, VT (22) 65.2, MD (28) 63.8, NJ (28) 57.3, CT (30) 57.2, MN (30) 50.8, NH (30) 50.2, IL (41) 59.0,
NY (43) 61.3,

11-20: CO (49) 52.7, KS (50) 38.8, NE (59) 36.4, WA (63) 58.8, RI (63) 58.3, UT (71) 37.7, WI (85) 49.6, OR (88) 56.2, ME (88) 51.5,
WY (89) 24.3,

21-25: CA (91) 66.1, PA (91) 49.6, HI (92) 67.5, ND (97) 30.2, DE (100) 56.0,

26-30:  IA (101) 44.9, MT (102) 38.9, OH (108) 45.8, MI (108) 49.9,
AK (113) 41.6,

31-40:  MO (117) 39.9, SD (120) 34.0, NC (122) 48.1, GA (125) 47.4, FL (128) 49.4, NM (141) 54.7, AZ (144) 48.1, IN (152) 40.0, TN (152) 36.4,

TX (153) 45.2,

41-50:  SC (158) 42.6, ID (158) 31.7, KY (160) 34.3, OK (175) 30.7, AR (177) 35.8, WV (177) 27.9, AL (179) 35.6,  LA (183) 39.8, NV (189) 51.3, MS (194) 40.8

Note that the addition of these three other lists, which took into account the high-school drop-out rate among other factors, fails to change the chart much. Better educated people voted for Clinton. And those lacking a higher education voted for Trump.

This isn't snobbery. It's fact.

And this isn't just my observation... Within days of the election, the Washington Post reported the results of the National Election Pool. This was a nation-wide exit poll of voters...that is, a poll taken as voters were exiting their polling place. Here is the breakdown of the poll's results by race, sex, and education.

Non-white college graduates: 72 C, 22 T (men 67-27, women 77-18)
White college graduates:        45 C, 48 T (men 39-53, women 51-44)
Note that the race of the voter corresponded to a drop-off of 27 pt.s.

Non-white, non-college graduates:  76 C, 20 T (men 69-25, women 81-16)
White non-college graduates:          29 C, 66 T (men 23-71, women 34-61)
Note that the failure to receive a higher education by a white voter corresponded to an additional drop-off of 16 pt.s. This represents more than 1/3 of the voting pct. of college graduates.

So how is it then that going to college...increased the chances a white person voted for Clinton...by over 50%?
 

Note also that Clinton received more votes than Trump among white college educated women, but far fewer votes than Trump among white women who failed to receive a higher education. Well, this supports our earlier conclusion regarding the cultural divide, where states in which women get pregnant at an earlier age and pop out more children over the course of their lifetime and subsequently receive less education join their husbands and ex-husbands in voting for the billionaire playboy Trump.


K. Now, let's put on our thinking caps... How or why does having a higher education make one less susceptible to Trump's charms/poison?

Well, one thought is that knowing more than just the bare minimum about history increases the odds one will know that trickle-down economics (the de facto religion of the Republican Party--going back to St. Ronald Reagan) doesn't work, and has never worked.

Or perhaps it has something to do with the fact most colleges teach science, and embrace an understanding of science as the foundation for higher learning?

I decided to add together the percentage of each state accepting the theory of evolution from this list with the percentage of each state accepting the theory of man-made global warming from this map, and call this metric acceptance of science.

This reflected the cultural divide. Almost perfectly. 20 of the 22 states (plus Washington D.C.) most trusting in science voted for Clinton (Alaska and Florida were the exceptions.) The 28 states least accepting of science voted for Trump. The states at the top of the list voted for Clinton in far greater numbers than the states at the bottom of the list.

I later took a closer look at this metric, and wondered if I wasn't being unfair. I decided to moderate my approach. I decided to balance out the evolution metric by adding in the rankings of the states from this survey, in which those believing man has evolved--according to God's design--are separated out from those believing man hasn't evolved at all, and has remained the same from his beginnings in the Garden of Eden.

I also added in a third metric reflecting one's belief in science, and that was the acceptance of the safety of vaccinations, based upon this list.

I then added up the acceptance of evolution, man-made global warming, and vaccinations, and created the following list.


1-10: MA (10) 64.5, ME (14) 51.5, DC (22) 90.9, CA (23) 66.1, RI (23) 58.3, VT (24) 65.2, IL (31) 59.0, NY (33) 61.3, CT (34) 57.2, NH (34) 50.2,

11-20: MD (39) 63.8, NJ (39) 57.3, NM (47) 54.7, HI (48) 67.5, VA (51) 52.9, MN (54) 50.8, CO (55) 52.7,
FL (55) 49.4, DE (57) 56.0, WA (59) 58.8,

21-25:
IA (64) 44.9, PA (65) 49.6, OR (69) 56.2, NC (77) 48.1, WI (78) 49.6, 

26-30:
NE (78) 36.4, NV (79) 51.3, GA (79) 47.4, AK (86) 41.6, SD (87) 34.0,

31-40:
AZ (88) 48.1, OH (91) 45.8, MT (97) 38.9, KS (98) 38.8, TX (105) 45.2, SC (105) 42.6, IN (105) 40.0, MI (106) 49.9, MO (116) 39.9, MS (117) 40.8,

41-51:
LA (117) 39.8, KY (120) 34.3, ND (123) 30.2, AL (125) 35.6, UT (128) 37.7, ID (129) 31.7, TN (135) 36.4, OK (135) 30.7, WY (135) 24.3, AR (140) 35.8, WV (146) 27.9, 

Well, heck, this doesn't come as a surprise. But it's still unsettling. The 25 states least accepting of science--that is, the 25 most superstitious, religious, and flat-out ignorant states--all voted for Trump.

The centrality of science in the race was confirmed, moreover, by exit polling, which showed that white evangelicals or white born-again Christians--those most prone to doubting science when it comes in conflict with religion--voted for Trump by a margin of 80-16, and that Clinton won 60-34 when the race was restricted to those not afflicted in this manner.

It follows then that this distrust of science and critical thinking among Trump supporters was the key factor in the election, and remains a key problem with the Trump presidency.

Smart ran into stupid and stupid won.

This 2013 study on conspiracy theories in the United States further illuminates the problem. It found that 64% of those considering themselves "very conservative" were either "not sure" or believed Saddam Hussein was behind 9/11 (and that the 2003 invasion of Iraq was thereby warranted), but that only 31% of these conservatives believed or were not sure if President Bush had misled the American people about weapons of mass destruction prior to this invasion of Iraq.

Now, I hope I don't have to explain that the verdict of history is already in on these issues, and that these conservatives have got it wrong--very wrong. There is no evidence Saddam Hussein participated in or encouraged the attack on America on 9-11-01, and there is a clear convincing case the George W. Bush Administration misled the American public about the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq prior to our 2003 invasion.

That these "conservatives" tend to think otherwise is indicative of their cognitive dissonance--their inability to realize they've been lied to when the person doing the lying is someone they wish to believe in.

Like Bush 43. Like Trump.


Total for Rankings of A - K  (Education, Empathy, and Cultural Diversity)

1-10: DC (33, 1 NA) 90.9,
MA (65) 64.5
, NY (77) 61.3, CA (94) 66.1, CT (94) 57.2, VT (101) 65.2, HI (119) 67.5, NJ (119) 57.3, IL (135) 59.0, MD (137) 63.8,

11-20: WA (142) 58.8, RI (143) 58.3, OR (170) 56.2, NH (181) 50.2, ME (190) 51.5, DE (197) 56.0, MN (200) 50.8, CO (214) 52.7, NM (219) 54.7, NV (245) 51.3,

21-25: VA (248) 52.9, WI (252) 49.6, PA (268) 49.6, FL (270) 49.4, AK (302) 41.6, 

26-30: AZ (304) 48.1, IA (308) 44.9, MI (309) 49.9, TX (314) 45.2, OH (320) 45.8,

31-40: NC (338) 48.1, GA (342) 47.4, NE (371) 36.4, KS (373) 38.8, MT (375) 38.9, IN (390) 40.0, MO (395) 39.9, UT (398) 37.7, LA (415) 39.8, SC (419) 42.6,

41-50:
ID (430) 31.7, KY (431) 34.3, OK (433) 30.7, ND (442) 30.2, MS (449) 40.8, WY (450) 24.3, SD (453) 34.0, AR (454) 35.8, WV (463) 27.9, TN (473) 36.4, AL (487) 35.6,


So it's real. The election was not about the economy. It was about a culture war that many on the Clinton side didn't understand. To them, higher education, an appreciation of science, and the separation of church and state are good things--obvious good things--and they can't quite grasp that there is a large sector of the country who disagrees with them on this, and would rather vote for a hate-mongering, self-promoting, tax-cheating con man than a smug woman, who drinks wine and wears pantsuits, for chrissakes.

In  sum, then, the people who think like Michael Moore lost, and the people who look like Michael Moore won.



Don't Count.
G. Most short-changed by the U.S. Government. This list reflects the states most short-changed in both the Electoral College (when compared to population), and taxes, when compared to taxes sent to Washington vs. Federal expenditures within the state.

NOTE: when adding this in, it should be added in in reverse order so that the most short-changed gets a 50 etc...

DC (NA)
NJ 57.3, MN 50.8, IL 59.0, CO 52.7, MA 64.5, NY 61.3, WI 49.6, MI 49.9, CT 57.2, CA 66.1,
Avg. for the top ten

WA 58.8, OR 56.2, FL 49.4, OH 45.8, NC 48.1, TX 45.2, PA 49.6, GA 47.4, IN 40.0, NV 51.3,
Avg. for the second ten

IA 44.9, MO 39.9, MD 63.8, NH 50.2, TN 36.4,

AZ 48.1, KS 38.8, SC 42.6, VA 52.9, KY 34.3,
Avg. for the third ten

OK 30.7, UT 37.7, DE 56.0, NE 36.4, AR 35.8, LA 39.8, AL 35.6, ME 51.5, ID 31.7, MS 40.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

MT 38.9, RI 58.3, WV 27.9, VT 65.2, NM 54.7, SD 34.0, HI 67.5, ND 30.2, AK 41.6, WY 24.3
Avg. for bottom ten


Finding #13: The election of Donald Trump was not a populist uprising.

Now, I know I'll lose a lot of you on this one. But bear with me. This idea among so many in the media that Trump "won" because he appealed to "ordinary folks" and that he was thereby a "populist" is so pervasive it's hard to cut through. So let me give it a whack.

My rejection of this claim comes, to be clear, from my understanding of the term "populism". Here is the introductory paragraph to Wikipedia's article on populism:

Populism is a political doctrine that proposes that the common people are exploited by a privileged elite, and which seeks to resolve this. The underlying ideology of populists can be left, right, or center. Its goal is uniting the uncorrupt and the unsophisticated "little man" against the corrupt dominant elites (usually the established politicians) and their camp of followers (usually the rich and the intellectuals). It is guided by the belief that political and social goals are best achieved by the direct actions of the masses.

Now, let's break it down, sentence by sentence, to see if this applies to Trump and his supporters.

Populism is a political doctrine that proposes that the common people are exploited by a privileged elite,

(Okay, so far, so good. Trump told his followers they were being exploited by liberal elites and the media, and that this had led to an invasion of brown people who were after their jobs, or worse, terrorists who were out to destroy their way of life.)

and which seeks to resolve this.

(Now, this may or may not apply to Trump. Many would say no. While Trump pushed to restrict immigration from seven (and then six) heavily Muslim countries, and similarly pushed congress to fund a border wall, these were but skeletons of the proposals he'd promised he was going to push--ones where all Muslims were banned, and Mexico paid for the wall. More telling, then, is that he spent many of his first days in office trying to accomplish things that were in apposition to what he'd claimed on the campaign trail. While he'd promised his followers cheaper and "better" health care, for example, he quickly got behind a plan which would raise prices for most of his followers, and ultimately deprive many of them of coverage. He also pushed plans that were not widely discussed on the campaign trail, and not widely supported by his followers. To be clear, in his first days in office he prioritized plans to 1) increase the availability of guns to the mentally ill, 2) allow coal companies to create more water pollution, 3) allow car companies to create more air pollution, 4) allow oil companies to bribe foreign officials without facing any consequences, and 5) drastically cut taxes on the rich, including himself.)

The underlying ideology of populists can be left, right, or center. Its goal is uniting the uncorrupt and the unsophisticated "little man" against the corrupt dominant elites (usually the established politicians)

(Now, this is where I have a big problem with the description of Trump as a populist, and the election of Trump as a populist uprising. Trump did not campaign as being "uncorrupt." That was Bernie Sanders. Trump, he pretty much bragged about how corrupt he was--about how he did business all over the world with all kinds of people, about how he'd avoided paying taxes whenever possible, no matter how sleazy the loophole. He actually refused to show his taxes! Or put his business in a blind trust! And what's this about "the established politicians"? While Trump did indeed promise to "drain the swamp" he quickly proved the lie to his words by making the leader of the party in power his Chief of Staff, and by adopting the pet legislation of a long-time leader of the party in power--even though it was at odds with his own purported agenda.)

and their camp of followers (usually the rich and the intellectuals).

(Nope, this isn't Trump, either. While he at times campaigned against Clinton by attacking her ties to Wall Street, he turned around and filled his cabinet with former Goldman-Sachs employees and billionaires. As far as intellectuals, well, that's not exactly true, either. Trump has not denounced intellectuals as much as he has sought to replace them with pseudo-intellectuals--namely, Steve Bannon and his fellow supporters of "economic nationalism".)

It is guided by the belief that political and social goals are best achieved by the direct actions of the masses.

(Now, there's the ding-ding-ding. Trump is not a populist. He may have pretended to be one, but he is not the real deal. While his campaign appearances were carefully staged to make it look like he had this incredible groundswell of support among the common folk, these were actually closed events. When it came time to have an open event (such as his inauguration), to be clear, we saw that the "masses" willing to show up in support of Trump were actually dwarfed both by the masses who'd showed up for his predecessor's inauguration, and the masses who marched in opposition to his inauguration in the days that followed. And that's not even to point out that Trump rejects all polls in which his popular support is questioned. The man is simply not as popular as he claims to be, or needs to be--to be the leader of a populist uprising. And has sought to hide this from those paying attention.)

So what is he then?


Finding #14: Trump is as much a fascist as he is a populist.

I know. I know. You can't believe it. I went there.

Well, let me say I never planned to go there, until I decided to compare the definition of populism with the definition of fascism.

Here is an excerpt from Wikipedia's article on fascism.

Fascists believe that liberal democracy is obsolete,

(Yep, that's Trump all right. He doesn't believe in democracy, not in the slightest. Although he called for an end to the Electoral College when he thought it had cost the Republicans an election, he tweeted "The Electoral College is actually genius" when he realized it had allowed him to sneak into the White House via the back door. As far as "liberal democracy'...  liberal democracy, according to Wikipedia, "is characterized by fair, free, and competitive elections, between multiple distinct political parties, a separation of powers into different branches of government, the rule of law in everyday life as part of an open society, and the equal protection of human rights, civil rights, human rights, civil rights, and political freedoms for all people." Well, sad to say, Trump doesn't believe in this, either. He spent much of his campaign and first days in office insisting the President of the United States has the right to over-rule the other branches of government whenever he deems it is in the interests of national security, and that this near-divine right extends so far as to torture those he considers an enemy to the state. He has also refused to criticize Russia for its interference in the election. So, no, he doesn't believe in "liberal democracy." Not anymore, anyhow.)

and they regard the complete mobilization of society under a totalitarian one-party state as necessary to prepare a nation for armed conflict and to respond effectively to economic difficulties.

(Now, this part is admittedly a stretch. Neither Trump nor his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, have called for a "complete mobilization of society." At least, not yet. They are, however, trying to cut or gut most every progressive program designed to help the poor or protect the environment. And have instead proposed a massive military build-up in a time of relative peace, in apparent anticipation of a fight-to-the-finish between the western world and radical Islam. And they've done this while refusing to compromise or even meet with Democratic leaders. So, no, they're not fascists...yet. )

Such a state is led by a strong leader—such as a dictator and a martial government composed of the members of the governing fascist party—to forge national unity and maintain a stable and orderly society.

(Now, apparently, this is how Trump sees himself. The strong man. He respects strong men. Like Putin. He insists that he, as President, has the absolute authority to control our borders in the name of national security, and that his judgment of national security is beyond review by judges tasked with protecting the rights of minorities, and enforcing the Constitution's prohibition of religious tests. It is also interesting that he's chosen to surround himself with generals. So, no, he's not a fascist leader...yet. But it seems as though this is where he wants to take us...)

Fascism rejects assertions that violence is automatically negative in nature, and views political violence, war, and imperialism as means that can achieve national rejuvenation.

(While this once again goes beyond where Trump has gone, at least so far, the long delay in Trump's denouncing the numerous hate crimes arising since his election was disturbing, to say the least.)

Fascists advocate a mixed economy, with the principal goal of achieving autarky through protectionist and interventionist economic policies.


(Now, this is Trump. 100%. While he talks of renegotiating trade deals to help restore American jobs, this is really just a code for saying he's gonna charge higher tariffs on imports, and force companies to make more of their goods here.)

So, I've presented my case... Is Trump more populist or fascist? Which term describes him best?

While candidate Trump pretended to be a populist, President Trump is giving indications he's really more of a fascist. Now, which will it be, Donald?

Who are you, really?

Will you provide the American people with the health care you promised, or will you appease the Social Darwinists within your party who think those who can't take care of themselves should just die?

Will you build bridges with your enemies and negotiate, as promised? Or continue hiding out in your Florida mansion, a la Citizen Kane?

Tick-tock, Donald. Time is running out. You're about to go down as the worst President in history. Time to do what's right...

for the country, Donald...for the country...


https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/11/magazine/i-thought-i-understood-the-american-right-trump-proved-me-wrong.html




Misogyny appears to have been a factor in the election.

Pew research reported:

"Trump’s margin among whites without a college degree is the largest among any candidate in exit polls since 1980. Two-thirds (67%) of non-college whites backed Trump, compared with just 28% who supported Clinton, resulting in a 39-point advantage for Trump among this group. In 2012 and 2008, non-college whites also preferred the Republican over the Democratic candidate but by less one-sided margins (61%-36% and 58%-40%, respectively)."

Well.




Now, non-Hispanic whites make up 63% of the population, and 69% of the voters, so it's not at all surprising that a candidate receiving strong support from non-Hispanic whites could win an election.

But a candidate who beats the drums of racism in order to stir up the white "base" should be wary.

Non-Hispanic whites accounted for 76% of the deaths between 2012 and 2016. So the next time around--should there be a next time around--won't be so easy.












There's also this... While the electoral college can be fixed or even eradicated, the 2016 election revealed an underlying divide in this country that will probably be with us for awhile.

THE ELECTION ON PAPER EVEN BEFORE THE CAMPAIGN: WAS IT A CONSERVATIVE ROUT?


First, it was an uphill climb for HC from the outset. This gallup poll proves how hard it would have been for Clinton to win the election. Just look at these numbers going into the election. (2015 Obama approval rating by state minus the conservative advantage per state--with the conservative advantage being the difference between the percentage of voters identifying themselves as conservative from the percentage of voters identifying themselves as liberal.)

2016
VT (60 - - 14 = 74) 65.2, MA (62 - -8 = 70) 64.5, CT (61 - -4 = 65) 57.2, NY (60 - -2 = 62) 61.3, CA (61 - 1 = 60) 66.1, MD (60 - 1 = 59) 63.8, WA (56 - 0.0 = 56) 58.8, HI (57 - 2 = 55) 67.5, IL (59 - 4 = 55) 59.0, DE (62 - 7 = 55) 56.0,
Avg. for the top ten  range

NJ (57 - 4 = 53) 57.3,
ME (53 - 0.0 = 53) 51.5, OR (53 - 1 = 52) 56.2, RI (55 - 4 = 51) 58.3, MN (52 - 9 = 43) 50.8, CO (51 - 9 = 42) 52.7, MI (52 - 10 = 42) 49.9, WI (51 - 12 = 39) 49.6, NM (51 - 13 = 38) 54.7, NH (47 - 9 = 38) 50.2,
Avg. for the second ten range

FL (51 - 13 = 38) 49.4, PA (49 - 12 = 37) 49.6VA (51 - 15 = 36) 52.9, NV (49 - 13 = 36) 51.3, AZ (50 - 14 = 36) 48.1, 

AK (47 - 11 = 36) 41.6, GA (49 - 19 = 30) 47.4, OH (45 - 16 = 29) 45.8, TX (49 - 20 = 29) 45.2, NC (48 - 20 = 28) 48.1,
Avg. for the third ten range

IA (44 - 19 = 25) 44.9, IN (44 - 19 = 25) 40.0, NE (43 - 18 = 25) 36.4, MO (43 - 21 = 22) 39.9, KS (41 - 21 = 20) 38.8, SC (44 - 25 = 19) 42.6, LA (43 - 27 = 16) 39.8, KY (38 - 22 = 16) 34.3, TN (41 - 26 = 15) 36.4, SD (40 - 25 = 15) 34.0,
Avg. for the fourth ten range

MS (44 - 31 = 13) 40.8, UT (39 - 26 = 13) 37.7, MT (37 - 26 = 11) 38.9, AR (39 - 28 = 11) 35.8, AL (41 - 30 = 11) 35.6, WV (29 - 19 = 10) 27.9, ND (38 - 31 = 7) 30.2,  OK (35 - 30 = 5) 30.7, ID (32 - 28 = 4) 31.7, WY (27 - 35 = -8) 24.3,   
Avg. for the bottom eleven range


2015

1-10: VT (51 - - 15.3 = 66.3) 65.2, MA (55 - - 5.8 = 60.8) 64.5, HI (58 - 1.3 = 56.7) 67.5, RI (55 - - 0.9 = 55.9) 58.3, NY (56 - 0.6 = 55.4) 61.3, CA (56 - 1.6 = 54.4) 66.1, MD (55 - 4.5 = 50.5) 63.8, NJ (52 - 3.3 = 48.7) 57.3, CT (50 - 1.6 = 48.4) 57.2, IL (52 - 5.1 = 46.9) 59.0,

11-20: WA (49 - 3.4 = 45.6) 58.8, OR (45 - 2.7 = 42.3) 56.2, DE (51 - 9.3 = 41.7) 56.0, NM (47 - 6.9 = 40.1) 54.7, CO (46 - 8.1 = 37.9) 52.7, MN (47 - 10.9 = 36.1) 50.8,
MI (47 - 11.6 = 35.4) 49.9, NV (45 - 9.9 = 35.1) 51.3, VA (46 - 13.4 = 32.6) 52.9, FL (46 - 14.0 = 32.0) 49.4,

21-25:
AZ (44 - 12.8 = 31.2) 48.1, PA (43 - 12.3 = 30.7) 49.6, WI (45 - 14.9 = 30.1) 49.6, ME (41 - 11.2 = 29.8) 51.5, NH (40 - 12 = 28.0) 50.2,

26-30:
OH (42 - 16.3 = 25.7) 45.8, TX (44 - 19.8 = 24.2) 45.2, IA (41 - 17.3 = 23.7) 44.9, GA (44 - 21.0 = 23.0) 47.4,

31-40:
NE (39 - 18.6 = 20.4) 36.4, KS (37 - 17.7 = 19.3) 38.8, MO (37 - 20 = 17.0) 39.9, IN (37 - 20.7 = 16.3) 40.0, AK (35 - 19.3 = 15.7) 41.6, MS (43 - 27.6 = 15.4) 40.8, LA (42 - 26.9 = 15.1) 39.8, SC (39 - 25.1 = 13.9) 42.6, TN (36 - 24.4 = 11.6) 36.4, SD (37 - 25.3 = 11.7) 34.0,

41-50:
MT (34 - 23.2 = 10.6) 38.9, KY (34 - 24.3 = 9.7) 34.3, AR (35 - 30.0 = 5.0) 35.8, OK (31 - 26.3 = 4.7) 30.7, UT (32 - 27.7 = 4.3) 37.7, ND (31 - 27.8 = 3.2) 30.2, AL (35 - 31.9 = 3.1) 35.6, WV (24 - 23.3 = 0.7) 27.9, WY (25 - 27.6 = - 2.6) 24.3, ID (26 - 31.8 = -5.8) 31.7,  

WAIT! Why is approval rating so closely related to one's self-identification as conservative or liberal? Is the president's approval rating a reflection of performance, or of how closely the public concurs with the president's politics? In other words, was there any way Obama could get a positive approval rating from someone self-identifying as conservative?

Now look at this data by comparing the advantage of those identifying as conservative with the percentage of those voting for Trump! He was down in almost every state! All in all, it was a terrible performance! And his performance in the biggest state...was second worst of all!! No wonder he's crying that the CA votes shouldn't count! If plus or minus 20 indicates HATE, then 9 states HATED Trump, as opposed to only 2 states hating Clinton. If plus or minus 10 suggests HATE then 27 states HATED TRUMP, as opposed to only 2 hating Clinton.

HI (2  vs. -35.0 = -37) 67.5, CA (1 vs -32.2 = -33.2) 66.1, MD (1 vs -27.6 = -28.6) 63.8, NM (13 vs - 9.4 = -22.4) 54.7, IL (4 vs -18.0 = -22) 59.0, MA (-8 vs -29.0 = -21) 64.5, VA (15 vs -5.8 = -20.8) 52.9, RI (4 vs -16.6 = -20.6) 58.3, NY (-2 vs -22.2 = -20.2) 61.3, DE (7 vs -12.0 = -19) 56.0,
Avg. for the top ten  range

NJ (4 vs -14.6 = -18.6) 57.3,
WA (0.0 vs -17.6 = -17.6) 58.8, VT (-14 vs -30.4 = -16.4) 65.2, NC (20 vs 3.8 = -16.2) 48.1, NV (13 vs -2.6 = -15.6) 51.3, CO (9 vs -5.4 = -14.4) 52.7,
GA (19 vs 5.2 = -13.8) 47.4, OR (1 vs -12.4 = 13.4) 56.2, MS (31 vs 18.4 = -12.6) 40.8, FL (13 vs 1.2 = -11.8) 49.4,
Avg. for the second ten range

WI (12 vs 0.8 = -11.2) 49.6, PA (12 vs 0.8 = -11.2) 49.6, MN (9 vs -1.6 = -10.6) 50.8, CT (-4 vs -14.4 = -10.4) 57.2, TX (20 vs 9.6 = -10.4) 45.2,

AZ (14 vs 3.8 = -10.2) 48.1, SC (25 vs 14.8 = -10.2) 42.6, MI (10 vs 0.2 = -9.8) 49.9, NH (9 vs -0.4 = -9.4) 50.2, IA (19 vs 10.2 = -8.8) 44.9,
Avg for the third ten range

OH (16 vs 8.4 = -7.6) 45.8, LA (27 vs 20.4 = -6.6) 39.8, MT (26 vs 22.2 = -3.8) 38.9, ME (0 vs -3.0 = -3.0) 51.5, UT (26 vs 24.6 = -1.4) 37.7, AL (30 vs 28.8 = -1.2) 35.6, MO (21 vs 20.2 = -0.8) 39.9,
Avg. for 31-37
The 37 states above voted for Clinton in greater numbers than one would expect based upon the self-identification of its voters as conservative or liberal.

AR (28 vs 28.4 = 0.4) 35.8, IN (19 vs 20 = 1.0) 40.0, TN (26 vs 27.2 = 1.2) 36.4, KS (21 vs 22.4 = 1.4) 38.8, AK (11 vs 16.8 = 5.8) 41.6, SD ( 25 vs 32 = 7) 34.0, ID (28 vs 36.6 = 8.6) 31.7, OK (30 vs 38.6 = 8.6) 30.7, ND (31 vs 39.6 = 8.6) 30.2, NE (18 vs 27.2 = 9.2) 36.4, KY (22 vs 31.4 = 9.4) 34.3, WY (27 vs 51.4 = 24.4) 24.3, WV (19 vs 44.2 = 25.2) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven range



So now let's look at the "conservative" number when added in with another similar study in which people self-identified as conservative moderate or liberal. 

DC (NA) 90.9 VT (- 14 + -3 = -17  avg -8.5) 65.2, MA (-8 + -11 =-19 avg -9.5 ) 64.5, HI (1 + 6 = 7 avg 3.5 ) 67.5, RI (4 + 0 = 4 avg 2.0) 58.3, NY (-2 + -4 =-6 avg -3) 61.3, CA (1 + 0 = 1.0 avg 0.5) 66.1, CT (-4 + -5 = -9 avg -4.5) 57.2, OR (1 + -1 = 0 avg 0) 56.2, NJ (4 + -2 = 2 avg 1.0) 57.3,
Avg. for the top ten  range

WA (0 + 3 = 3 avg 1.5) 58.8, MD (1 + 0 = 1 avg 0.5) 63.8, IL (4 + 2 = 6 avg 3) 59.0, NM (13 + 9 = 22 avg 11) 54.7, CO (9 + 5 = 14 avg 7) 52.7, DE (7 + 7 = 14 avg 7) 56.0, NV (13 + 8 = 21 avg 10.5) 51.3, MN (9 + 8 = 17 avg 8.5) 50.8, ME (0 + 8 = 8 avg 4) 51.5, MI (10 + 10 =20 avg 10) 49.9,
Avg. for the second ten range

NH (9 + 2 = 11.0 avg 5.5) 50.2, PA (12 + 10 = 22 avg 11) 49.6, AZ (14 + 16 = 30 avg 15) 48.1, VA (15 + 12 = 27 avg 13.5) 52.9, FL (13 + 11 = 24 avg 12) 49.4, 

WI (12 + 12 = 24 avg 12) 49.6, OH (16 + 10 = 26 avg 13) 45.8, IA (19 + 13 = 32 avg 16) 44.9, KS (21 + 14 = 35 avg 17.5) 38.8, NE (18 + 18 = 36 avg 18) 36.4,
Avg. for the third ten range

AK (11+ 16 = 37 avg 13.5) 41.6, NC (20 + 14 = 34 avg 17) 48.1, TX (20 + 17 = 37 avg 18.5) 45.2, MO (21 + 17 = 38 avg 19) 39.9, IN (19 + 10 = 29 avg 14.5) 40.0, GA (19 + 14 = 33 avg 16.5) 47.4, MT (26 + 23 = 49 avg 24.5) 38.9, WV (19 + 20 = 39 avg 19.5) 27.9, KY (22 + 14 = 36 avg 18) 34.3, TN (26 + 22 = 48 avg 24) 36.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten range

SC (25 + 21 = 46 avg 23) 42.6, SD (25 + 21 = 46 avg 23) 34.0, OK (30 + 19 = 49 avg 24.5) 30.7, LA (27 + 26 = 53 avg 26.5) 39.8, MS (31 + 29 = 60 avg 30) 40.8, WY (27 + 29 = 56 avg 28) 24.3, UT (26 + 26 = 52 avg 26) 37.7, ND (31 + 14 = 45 avg 22.5) 30.2, AR (28 + 25 = 53 avg 26.5) 35.8, ID (28 + 20 = 48 avg 24) 31.7, AL (30 + 28 = 58 avg 29) 35.6, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven range

So here is how the election results look in comparison to these averages:
DC (NA)
HI (3.5  vs. -35.0 = 38.5) 67.5, CA (0.5 vs -32.2 = 32.7) 66.1, MD (0.5 vs -27.6 = -28.1) 63.8, IL (3 vs -18.0 = -21.0) 59.0, VT (-8.5 vs -30.4 = -21.9) 65.2, WA (1.5 vs -17.6 = -19.1) 58.8, MA (-9.5 vs -29.0 = -19.5) 64.5, NY (-3 vs -22.2 = -19.2) 61.3, DE (7 vs -12.0 = -19.0) 56.0, VA (13.5 vs -5.8 = -19.3) 52.9,
Avg. for the top ten  range


NM (11 vs - 9.4 = -20.4) 54.7, RI (2 vs -16.6 = -18.6) 58.3, NJ (1 vs -14.6 = -15.6) 57.3, OR (0 vs -12.4 = 12.4) 56.2, NC (17 vs 3.8 = -13.2) 48.1, CT (-4.5 vs -14.4 = -9.9) 57.2, WI (12 vs 0.8 = -11.2) 49.6, ME (4 vs -3.0 = -7) 51.5, CO (7 vs -5.4 = -12.4) 52.7, GA (16.5 vs 5.2 = -11.3) 47.4,     
Avg. for the second ten range

NV (10.5 vs -2.6 = -13.1) 51.3, FL (12 vs 1.2 = -13.2) 49.4, MN (8.5 vs -1.6 = 10.1) 50.8,  MI (10 vs 0.2 = -10.2) 49.9, AZ (15 vs 3.8 = -11.2) 48.1, PA (11 vs 0.8 = -10.2) 49.6, MS (30 vs 18.4 = -11.6) 40.8, TX (18.5 vs 9.6 = -8.9) 45.2, SC (23 vs 14.8 = -8.2) 42.6, NH (5.5 vs -0.4 = -5.9) 50.2,
Avg for the third ten range

LA (26.5 vs 20.4 = -6.1) 39.8, IA (16 vs 10.2 = -5.8) 44.9, OH (13 vs 8.4 = -4.6) 45.8,  UT (26 vs 24.6 = -1.4) 37.7, AL (29 vs 28.8 = -0.2) 35.6, MT (24.5  vs 22.2 = -2.3) 38.9,
Avg. for 31-36
The 36 states above voted for Clinton in greater numbers than one would expect based upon the self-identification of its voters as conservative or liberal.

AK (13.5 vs 16.8 = 3.3) 41.6, AR (26.5 vs 28.4 = 1.9) 35.8, MO (19 vs 20.2 = 1.2) 39.9, TN (24 vs 27.2 = 3.2) 36.4, IN (14.5 vs 20 = 5.5) 40.0, KS (17.5 vs 22.4 = 4.9) 38.8, SD ( 23 vs 32 = 9.0) 34.0, NE (18 vs 27.2 = 9.2) 36.4, ID (24 vs 36.6 = 12.6) 31.7, KY (18 vs 31.4 = 13.4) 34.3, OK (24.5 vs 38.6 = 14.1) 30.7, ND (22.5 vs 39.6 = 17.1) 30.2, WV (19.5 vs 44.2 = 24.7) 27.9, WY (28 vs 51.4 = 23.4) 24.3,
Avg. for the bottom eleven range

None of Clinton's states under-performed when pitted against the liberal/conservative slant of the state. She won 15 states in which more voters ID as conservative than liberal. Meanwhile, 14 of Trump's 30 victories came by less than one would assume by the self-description of the voters in that state. If a landslide means winning by 20 points or more than expected, then, Clinton had 5 landslides and Trump had 2. If it's 9.9 or more, well, than she had 19 of 20, while Trump had 6 of 30.

She actually did quite well. Just look at how the right-wing hate machine turned the Reps against Obama... Compare the Ind approval to the Rep approval. At first it was 1.5 to 1, but it quickly became 4 to 1 or 5 to 1. Why? What did Obama do to deserve this hate? Answer: Fox News and the right wing blogoshere and propaganda machine spread lie after lie.

Obama approval ratings by year (Gallup)
2009 Rep Beg 41 End 16 Range 41-14, Ind Beg 62 End 47 Range 63-43, Dem Beg 88 End 85 Range 93-81 (Saves auto Industry, avoids economic collapse)
2010 Rep Beg 15 End 15 Range 19-7, Ind Beg 45 End 45 Range 48-38, Dem Beg 84 End 81 Range 86-76 (Signs Obamacare into law)
2011 Rep Beg 13 End 12 Range 21-7, Ind Beg 46 End 39 Range 49-34, Dem Beg 82 End 76 Range 85-72 (Kills Bin Laden)
2012 Rep Beg 10 End 12 Range 15-6, Ind Beg 41 End 46 Range 53-39, Dem Beg 83 End 93 Range 93-80 (U.S. Ambassador killed in Libya)
2013 Rep Beg 12 End 11 Range 18-7, Ind Beg 49 End 32 Range 51-32, Dem Beg 87 End 81 Range 92-76 (Rise of ISIL in Iraq)
2014 Rep Beg 7 End 10 Range 12-6, Ind Beg 35 End 44 Range 44-31, Dem Beg 78 End 82 Range 82-75
2015 Rep Beg 8 End 10 Range 14-8, Ind Beg 40 End 42 Range 47-40, Dem Beg 81 End 81 Range 86-79 (Supreme Court rules in favor of same-sex marriage)
2016+Rep Beg 10 End 14 Range 17-8, Ind Beg 42 End 61 Range 61-42, Dem Beg 84 End 95 Range 95-84

Now, let's look at the approval ratings of Obama's predecessor, George W. Bush.
2001 Rep Beg 88 End 98 Range 99-85, Ind Beg 53 End 82 Range 89-44, Dem Beg 32 End 78 Range 84-26 (Responds against 9/11 attack by invading Afghanistan)
2002 Rep Beg 98 End 88 Range 99-88, Ind Beg 83 End 56 Range 83-55, Dem Beg 73 End 41 Range 73-33 (Begins drum roll to invade Iraq)
2003 Rep Beg 96 End 94 Range 97-86, Ind Beg 58 End 54 Range 70-42, Dem Beg 37 End 36 Range 50-16 (Invades Iraq, Declares Victory)
2004 Rep Beg 93 End 88 Range 96-85, Ind Beg 56 End 44 Range 60-37, Dem Beg 29 End 14 Range 29-8 (Setbacks in Iraq)
2005 Rep Beg 91 End 89 Range 94-79, Ind Beg 42 End 31 Range 52-26, Dem Beg 19 End 17 Range 24-7
2006 Rep Beg 85 End 76 Range 87-68, Ind Beg 32 End 29 Range 36-21, Dem Beg 9 End 7 Range 15-4
2007 Rep Beg 79 End 77 Range 79-65, Ind Beg 31 End 23 Range 34-21, Dem Beg 7 End 6 Range 10-5 (Surge in Iraq)
2008+Rep Beg 76 End 75 Range 76-55, Ind Beg 20 End 28 Range 31-19, Dem Beg 7 End 6 Range 9-3 (Economic Collapse and Bank Bail-out)

Well, from this it's obvious the Republican Party is cognitively impaired. 50% more Republicans approved of Bush's "performance" at a time of economic collapse brought about by his policies than they did of Obama's "performance" when he took office and cleaned up Bush's mess. And nearly 5 times as many approved of Bush's "performance" when he invaded a country that had never attacked us, Iraq, than they did of Obama's performance when he made the call to track down the man behind 9/11, Bin Laden, while shielded by an important ally, Pakistan

Well, from this it's clear that 40% or more of those voting Republican are unhinged, and have an irrational hatred of Democrats that precludes them from acknowledging the failures of their elected officials, or acknowledging the successes of those they voted against. This is not politics as usual. The Dems rallied behind Bush after the 9/11 attack, when he appeared presidential and strong in a time of crisis, but the Repubs were unable to support Obama in any numbers no matter the situation.


6. The glass ceiling is real. Now that Nevada, which voted for Clinton, has voted for a female Senator, thirteen states remain that have never voted for a female senator or a female governor. Trump won eleven of those thirteen. The only states to cross the line to vote for Hillary beyond NV were CO and VT. These were all close races. In head to head, she received VA 52.9, CO, 52.7 and NV 51.3. They were 3 of the 6 closest races for Clinton, with ME 51.5 , MN 50.8, and NH 50.2 the other three. Meanwhile the eleven won by Trump were mostly landslides. PA 49.6 GA 47.4 OH 45.8 MS 40.9 IN 40.0 UT 37.7 TN 36.4 AL 35.6 ID 31.7 WV 27.9 and WY 24.3.Thus, in the 14 states in which a woman had never been elected to the US Senate or the Governor's office (Note: I'm not counting wives or widows elected to continue their husband's work, or women attaining office solely through appointment or resignation) Clinton received on avg. 41.0% of the head to head vote. When the vote totals for the states in which a woman had never won were combined, moreover, she received about 45.3% of the vote in these 14 historically scared of women states, while receiving about 53.03 of the 37 not so scared of women states and district. That's a difference of 7.7%. It's impossible to believe Clinton being a woman didn't have something--and probably a lot- to do with it. But let's test this, shall we? Let's compare this election to 2012. In that election, President Obama won 5 of these 14 states VA CO NV PA and OH, and received about 47.23% of the head to head vote, while receiving about 53.64 of the not so scared of women states. That's a 6.4% difference. This suggests then that Ms. Clinton lost about 1.3% of the vote in these states because of her gender, and that her gender was the decisive difference in Pennsylvania, at the very least. (It seems likely that some of those voting against her because she was a woman voted against Obama for being an African-American as well. On the other hand, however, there were certainly some who would never vote for a black man but would have no problem voting for a white woman. So the true number of votes lost by her being a woman is probably much much greater than 1.3%.)  

And, oh yeah, there's also this. Clinton won 18 of the 25 states with the smallest wage gap between male and female workers, but lost 23 of the 26 states with the largest wage gap. That's not a coincidence.


Here's a list in the order of smallest wage gap between men and women built upon this list. (I accidentally removed the wages while creating a new list.)

NY (.89) 61.3,
DE (.89) 56.0, FL (.87) 49.4, DC (.86) 90.9, NC (.86) 48.1, RI (.86) 58.3, CA (.86) 66.1, NM (.85) 54.7, HI (.84) 67.5, VT (.84) 65.2,
Avg. for the top ten

NV (.84) 51.3,
MD (.84) 63.8,
AZ (.83) 48.1, MA (.82) 64.5, CT (.82) 57.2, KY (.82) 34.3, NJ (.82) 57.3, MN (.81) 50.8, TN (.81) 36.4, SC (.81) 42.6,  
Avg. for the second ten

OR (.81) 56.2,
CO (.81) 52.7, GA (.81) 47.4, IL (.79) 59.0, WA (.79) 58.8,

TX (.79) 45.2, PA (.79) 49.6, AR (.79) 35.8, NE (.79) 36.4, ME (.78) 51.5,  
Avg. for the third ten

WI (.78) 49.6, SD (.78) 34.0, AK (.78) 41.6, MO (.78) 39.9, VA (.78) 52.9, IA (.77) 44.9, KS (.77) 38.8, NH (.76) 50.2, AL (.76) 35.6, IN (.76) 40.0, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

MS (.76) 40.8, OH (.75) 45.8, MI (.74) 49.9, ID (.74) 31.7, OK (.73) 30.7, MT (.73) 38.9, ND (.71) 30.2, UT (.71) 37.7, WV (.71) 27.9, LA (.68) 39.8, WY (.64) 24.3, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Here's the same list in order of attitudes towards women based upon this more wide-reaching list.

DC (NA) 90.9,
HI (1) 67.5, AK (2) 41.6, ME (3) 51.5, CA (4) 66.1, VT (5) 65.2, NH (6) 50.2, MN (7) 50.8, MD (8) 63.8, NY (9) 61.3, WI (10) 49.6,
Avg. for the top ten


WA (11) 58.8,
ND (12) 30.2, OR (13) 56.2, WV (14) 27.9, MO (15) 39.9, MA (16) 64.5, IL (17) 59.0, IA (18) 44.9, NM (19) 54.7, NV (20) 51.3,
Avg. for the second ten

SD (21) 34.0, NE (22) 36.4, CO (23) 52.7, AZ (24) 48.1, WY (25) 24.3, 

IN (26) 40.0,  FL (27) 49.4, MI (28) 49.9, DE (29) 56.0, KS (30) 38.8,
Avg. for the third ten

TN (31) 36.4, MT (32) 38.9, AR (33) 35.8, CT (34) 57.2, AL (35) 35.6, NC (36) 48.1, ID (37) 31.7, TX (38) 45.2, RI (39) 58.3, OH (40) 45.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

VA (41) 52.9,
OK (42) 30.7, KY (43) 34.3, MS (44) 40.8, SC (45) 42.6, LA (46) 39.8, PA (47) 49.6, NJ (48) 57.3, GA (49) 47.4, UT (50) 37.7,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Clinton won 14 of the 20 states judged most fair to women, while Trump won 24 of the 30 judged most unfair to women. So, NO. it's not a hallucination. The glass ceiling is real.


O. And here's a list regarding the rape rate per 100,000 residents for each state. This list is built upon this list.

NJ (11.7) 57.3, NY (14.7) 61.3, VA (17.7) 52.9, VT (19.3) 65.2, NC (20.3) 48.1, HI (20.5) 67.5, CA (20.6) 66.1, MD (21.0) 63.8, WI (21.3) 49.6, GA (21.4) 47.4,
Avg. for the top ten

WV (22.7) 27.9, MA (24.7) 64.5, MO (25.1) 39.9, LA (25.2) 39.8, IN (25.5) 40.0, CT (25.6) 57.2, PA (26.1) 49.6, DE (26.5) 56.0, WY (26.7) 24.3, AL (26.9) 35.6, 
Avg. for the second ten

FL (27.2) 49.4, RI (27.4) 58.3, MS (27.5) 40.8, IL (27.7) 59.0, ME (28.0) 51.5,

IA (28.3) 44.9, KY (29.0) 34.3, OR (29.2) 56.2, TX (29.6) 45.2, ID (30.0) 31.7,
Avg. for the third ten

MN (30.5) 50.8, TN (31.5) 36.4, OH (31.7) 45.8, WA (31.8) 58.8, UT (33.0) 37.7, NV (33.7) 51.3, NH (34.0) 50.2, AZ (34.7) 48.1, SC (35.5) 42.6, KS (36.5) 38.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

DC (37.3) 90.9, MT (37.7) 38.9, NE (38.3) 36.4, ND (38.9) 30.2, CO (40.7) 52.7, OK (41.6) 30.7, AR (42.3) 35.8, NM (45.9) 54.7, MI (46.4) 49.9, SD (70.2) 34.0, AK (79.7) 41.6,     
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Not entirely convincing, but suggestive. Clinton won 7 of the 8 states with the lowest rape rate, and Trump won 11 of the 13 states with the highest rate rape. (DC excluded)





Finding #7: The nation is at one of the most divided points in its history.


Was Birther bit a trial run?
"Remember, we are competing in a rigged election," Trump said at a Wisconsin rally Monday night. "They even want to try and rig the election at the polling booths, where so many cities are corrupt and voter fraud is all too common." CNN 10-19-2016
16 borderline states heading into election (within 6 points). 12 on HC's side, and 4 on T's side. Of the 12 on HC's side, 9 received more Trump than expected, with 5 of the 8 closest (WI 5.3 MI 4.2 PA 3.7 NC .7 FL .7) slipping over the line, and the other 7 holding tight (NV 1.2, NH 3.6 CO 4.0, VA 5.8, NM 5.8, and MN 5.8) holding tight, with 3 Western states (NV, CO, and NM) actually picking up more votes for Clinton than expected. Trump held on to all 4 of his borderline states, and picked up more votes in these states than expected.

There was thereby two large blocs of unexpected voters. Latinos (presumably) in the west (Texas was the only Trump state in which he won by less than 1% greater than expected.) And white bubbas throughout the country, but particularly in the flyover. Trump won by ten points or more wider margins than expected in 5 states (WY 11.3 ID 12.2 ND 12.7 SD 14.3 WV 15.6)

7. Question if underpolling is legit. Compare to pop.s of places like Wyoming, etc.
8. Compare underpolling Trump numbers to lack of education.

9. Ask if it's reasonable to assume a Casino mogul is "lucky" when he has an incredible turn of events involving automated machines and government officials. 
10. The disturbing trend. Show how imbalance between top 5 CA TX NY FL AND IL and rest of nation is far greater than in recent times. Clinton won 56.75% in the top 5 states representing almost 40% of the country, but only 48.13 in the rest of the country. That's an 8.62 divide. larger than the Obama divide in 2012 of 5.57. From 1960 to 1988 the divide was never more than 1.75. Shows how the Trump states were the dumbest, fattest, most beer-drinking, most gun-living, etc.

 


Was The Election of Trump a Populist Cry for Help?
Let's look at the race based on various factors.

First, let's look at the election results to see if the vote was primarily cultural, with the most rural states protesting the influx of immigrants into the country, and concurrent rise in tolerance for previously marginalized Americans, such as African-Americans and homosexuals. Here, then, is a list of the states by population density, reflecting inhabitants per square mile, alongside how each state voted for Clinton against Trump.

DC (10,298) 90.9, NJ (1189) 57.3, RI (1006) 58.3, MA (852) 64.5, CT (741) 57.2, MD (606) 63.8, DE (471) 56.0, NY (415) 61.3, FL (360) 49.4, PA (285) 49.6,
Avg. for the top ten 60.8%

OH (283) 45.8, CA (244) 66.1, IL (232) 59.0, HI (217) 67.5, VA (207) 52.9, NC (201) 48.1,
IN (183) 40.0, MI (175) 49.9, GA (165) 47.4, SC (157) 42.6,
Avg. for the second ten 51.9%

TN (157) 36.4, KY (110) 34.3, NH (147) 50.2, WI (105) 49.6, LA (105) 39.8,

Now, this starts out with a bang. Clinton won the eight most crowded states, and twelve of the top fifteen most crowded states.

WA (103) 58.8,
TX (98) 45.2, AL (95) 35.6, MO (87) 39.9, WV (77) 27.9,
Avg. for the third ten 41.8%

VT (68) 65.2,
MN (67) 50.8, MS (64) 40.8, AZ (57) 48.1, AR (56) 35.8, OK (55) 30.7, IA (55) 44.9, CO (49) 52.7, ME (43) 51.5, OR (40) 56.2,
Avg. for the fourth ten 47.7%


KS (35) 38.8, UT (34) 37.7, NV (25) 51.3, NE (24) 36.4, ID (20) 31.7, NM (17) 54.7, SD (11) 34.0, ND (10) 30.2, MT (7) 38.9, WY (6) 24.3, AK (1) 41.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven 38.1%

But it then fizzles out. It's hard to say the rurals rousted the urbans when Trump won eight of the twenty most crowded states and Clinton won five of the fourteen least crowded states. And it's hard to say the rural/urban divide was a key factor when states 31 through 40 voted for Clinton in far greater numbers than states 21 through 30. There must be more to it. A lot more to it.


Was It, Instead, a Revolt of the Miserables?

A. Well, what about life expectancy, then? I re-arranged the list based upon a list of states by the life expectancy among white Americans. This list was consulted.

DC (84.3) 90.9, MN (81.2) 50.8, CT (81.0) 57.2, NY (80.5) 61.3, HI (80.4) 67.5, MA (80.4) 64.5, VT (80.4) 65.2, SD (80.4) 34.0, NJ (80.3) 57.3, WI (80.3) 49.6,
Avg. for the top ten

CO (80.2) 52.7, ND (80.2) 30.2, NH (80.1) 50.2, UT (80.1) 37.7, NE (80.0) 36.4, CA (79.8) 66.1, IA (79.8) 44.9, AZ (79.8) 48.1, WA (79.7) 58.8, RI (79.7) 58.3,  
Avg. for the second ten

ID (79.4) 31.7, VA (79.4) 52.9, MD (79.4) 63.8, AK (79.4) 41.6, IL (79.3) 59.0, 

OR (79.2) 56.2, FL (79.1) 49.4, ME (79.1) 51.5, MT (79.1) 38.9, NM (79.0) 54.7,

Avg. for the third ten

MI (79.0) 49.9, PA (78.9) 49.6, KS (78.8) 38.8, DE (78.6) 56.0, WY (78.4) 24.3, NC (78.3) 48.1, OH (78.1) 45.8, TX (78.0) 45.2, SC (77.8) 42.6, IN (77.7) 40.0,
Avg. for the fourth ten

MO (77.7) 39.9, GA (77.6) 47.4, NV (76.7) 51.3, TN (76.7) 36.4, LA (76.7) 39.8, AR (76.3) 35.8, MS (76.1) 40.8, KY (76.0) 34.3, OK (76.0) 30.7, AL (76.0) 35.6, WV (75.4) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Hmmm... That's kinda interesting. The seven states with the longest life expectancy for whites voted for Clinton and the eight states with the shortest life expectancy for whites--make that sixteen of the seventeen states with the shortest life expectancy for whites-- voted for Trump.

B. Now compare this to a list most would think would be more relevant: suicides per 100,000 population. Here, once again, the lowest number corresponds to the highest number of votes for Clinton, and the highest number corresponds to the highest number of votes for Trump. But it falls apart in the middle.

DC 90.9, NJ 57.3, NY 61.3, MA 64.5, RI 58.3, MD 63.8, IL 59.0, CT 57.2, CA 66.1, GA 47.4,
Avg. for the top ten

TX 45.2, MN 50.8, WI 49.6, PA 49.6, LA 39.8, MI 49.9, NE 36.4, VA 52.9, IA 44.9, NC 48.1,
range of top fourteen states 67.5 to 45.2

OH 45.8, VT 65.2, HI 67.5, DE 56.0, SC 42.6,

MS 40.8, NH 50.2, IN 40.0, FL 49.4, WA 58.8,
Avg. for the third ten

ME 51.5, TN 36.4, AL 35.6, MO 39.9, ND 30.2, KY 34.3, AR 35.8, SD 34.0, WV 27.9, AZ 48.1,
Avg. for the fourth ten

KS 38.8, OK 30.7, OR 56.2, NV 51.3, ID 31.7, CO 52.7, UT 37.7, NM 54.7, MT 38.9, AK 41.6, WY 24.3
range of bottom twenty states 56.2 to 24.3.

Fifteen of the sixteen most suicidal Trump states are below 45.2--the lowest pct among the fourteen least suicidal.

The nine least suicidal states voted for Clinton and sixteen of the twenty most suicidal states voted for Trump.

There's a correlation, moreover, with this chart and pop density. Here are the states in order of pop density, with the ranking of pop density followed by the ranking of age- adjusted suicides per 100,000.

DC (1,1) 90.9, NJ (2,2) 57.3, RI (3.5) 58.3, MA (4,4) 64.5, CT (5,8) 57.2, MD (6,6) 63.8, DE (7,24) 56.0, NY (8,3) 61.3, FL (9,29) 49.4, PA (10,14) 49.6,
Avg. for the top ten

OH (11,21) 45.8, CA (12,9) 66.1, IL (13,7) 59.0, HI (14,23) 67.5, VA (15,18) 52.9, NC (16,20) 48.1, IN (17,28) 40.0, MI (18,16) 49.9, GA (19,10) 47.4, SC (20,25) 42.6,
Avg. for the second ten

TN (21,32) 36.4, KY (22,36) 34.3, NH (23,27) 50.2, WI (24,13) 49.6, LA (25,15) 39.8,

WA (26,30) 58.8,
TX (27,11) 45.2, AL (28,33) 35.6, MO (29,34) 39.9, WV (30,40) 27.9,
Avg. for the third ten

VT (31,27) 65.2,
MN (32,12) 50.8, MS (33,26) 40.8, AZ (34,40) 48.1, AR (35,37) 35.8, OK (36,42) 30.7, IA (37,19) 44.9, CO (38,46) 52.7, ME (39,31) 51.5, OR (40,43) 56.2,
Avg. for the fourth ten 


KS (41,41) 38.8, UT (42,47) 37.7, NV (43,44) 51.3, NE (44,17) 36.4, ID (45,45) 31.7, NM (46,48) 54.7, SD (47,38) 34.0, ND (48,35) 30.2, MT (49,49 38.9, WY (50,51) 24.3, AK (51,50) 41.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

When one factors in the correlation of pop density and suicide this demonstrates Trump's failure to reach cities more than it shows his attraction to the suicidal.

Beginning C.  This Gallup list presents a number of lists relating to over-all well-being and then adds them together. But let's focus on their list ranking the states by physical health for now.

HI, VT, CO, ME, MA, CA, NJ, FL, NM, AZ,

MN MD CT NY AK SD TX RI OR VA

NH DE WA IL GA NV UT NC PA NE

WI WY MT ND IA MO MI ID SC KS

LA OH TN IN MS AL AR OK KY WV


Now let's look compare this to a ranking of the states by physical health and health care, based on this list.

HI 67.5, VT 65.2, DC 90.9, MA 64.5, MN 50.8, NH 50.2, CT 57.2, UT 37.7, CO 52.7, WA 58.8,

NE 36.4, NJ 57.3, ND 30.2, NY 61.3, RI 58.3, ME 51.1, CA 66.1, ID 31.7, MD 63.8, SD 34.0,

OR 56.2, VA 52.9,
IA 44.9, MT 38.9, WI 49.6,

WY 24.3, KS 38.8, AK 41.6, IL 59.0, PA 49.6,
 
AZ 48.1, NC 48.1, DE 56.0, FL 49.4, TX 45.2, MI 49.9, MO 39.9, NM 54.7, NV 51.3, OH 45.8,
 
GA 47.4, IN 40.0, SC 42.6, TN 36.4, KY 34.3, OK 30.7, AL 35.6, WV 27.9, AR 35.8, MS 40.8, LA 39.8

Hmmm... The top 7 and 9 of top 10 voted for Clinton, while the bottom 12 voted for Trump.


And now let's look at a ranking of the states by mental health and health care, based on this list.

CT 57.2, MA 64.5, VT 65.2, SD 34.0, MN 50.8, NJ 57.3, IA 44.9, ND 30.2, PA 49.6, ME 51.1,

DE 56.0, NY 61.3, AK 41.6, MD 63.8, IL 59.0, HI 67.5, MI 49.9, DC 90.9, KY 34.3, NH 50.2, 

KS 38.8, NM 54.7, CA 66.1, OK 30.7, CO 52.7,

OH 45.8, NE 36.4, FL 49.4, WY 24.3, WA 58.8,

MO 39.9, TX 45.2, NC 48.1, GA 47.4, WI 49.6, RI 58.3, SC 42.6, VA 52.9, MT 38.9, UT 37.7,

TN 36.4, LA 39.8, WV 27.9, MS 40.8, IN 40.0, AL 35.6, AR 35.8, ID 31.7, OR 56.2, AZ 48.1, NV 51.3,

Another subtle indicator. Clinton won 16 of the 25 with the best mental health and healthcare, and Trump won 21 of the 26 with the worst mental health and healthcare.

And now look at this list ranking the states by quality of health care. This is based on this list.

MN 50.8, SD 34.0, HI 67.5, WI 49.6, IA 44.9, ND 30.2, CO 52.7, NE 36.4, DC 90.9, MA 64.5,

NH 50.2, VT 65.2, MT 38.9, ME 51.1, CT 57.2, ID 31.7, WA 58.8, UT 37.7, WY 24.3, CA 66.1,

AZ 48.1, OR 56.2, KS 38.8, FL 49.4, DE 56.0,

MI 49.9, MD 63.8, MO 39.9, RI 58.3, NY 61.3,

VA 52.9, PA 49.6, SC 42.6, AK 41.6, NJ 57.3, OH 45.8, NC 48.1, IL 59.0, NM 54.7, IN 40.0,

GA 47.4, NV 51.3, OK 30.7, TX 45.2, AR 35.8, LA 39.8, TN 36.4, WV 27.9, KY 34.3, AL 35.6, MS 40.8,

While not as convincing as other metrics, even here. on Wallethub, it's clear that the bottom of the barrel was scraped up by Trump.

Now, let's add these four together.


FINAL C: Best Health and Health Care


VT (19) 65.2, HI (21) 67.5, MA (21) 64.5, MN (22) 50.8, CT (36) 57.2, DC (30, 1 NA) 90.9, CO (44) 52.7, ME (44) 51.1, SD (52) 34.0, NH (58) 50.2,

NJ (60) 57.3, ND (61) 30.2, CA (66) 66.1, NY (70) 61.3, IA (70) 44.9, MD (72) 63.8, NE (76) 36.4, WA (80) 58.8, AK (90) 41.6, DE (91) 56.0,

UT (93) 37.7, FL (94) 49.4, WI (95) 49.6, RI (98) 58.3, PA (100) 49.6,

IL (106) 59.0, WY (106) 24.3, NM (108) 54.7, MT (109) 38.9, OR (111) 56.2,

VA (111) 52.9, KS (111) 38.8, AZ (112) 48.1, MI (116) 49.9, ID (120) 31.7, NC (130) 48.1, TX (130) 45.2, MO (132) 39.9, GA (141) 47.4, OH (144) 45.8,
 
SC (152) 42.6, NV (158) 51.3, OK (161) 30.7, KY (162) 34.3, IN (171) 40.0, TN (175) 36.4, LA (180) 39.8, AR (188) 35.8, AL (188) 35.6, WV (189) 27.9, MS (190) 40.8,
 
Trump won 19 of the 20 least healthy states with the worst health care. That makes sense..their cries to overturn Obamacare were really cries for give us something better!


Beginning D. So, let's keep looking. This Gallup list reflects "over-all well-being", as defined by "purpose, social, financial, community and physical".

DC 90.9,
HI 67.5, AK 41.6, MT 38.9, CO 52.7, WY 24.3, SD 34.0 (20), MN 50.8 (11), UT 37.7 (21), AZ 48.1 (42), TX 45.2 (49),

CA 66.1 (34), WI 49.6 (27), IA 44.9 (22), FL 49.4 (40), ND 30.2 (22), VA 52.9 (32), SC 42.6 (48), NM 54.7 (54), CT 57.2 (44), NC 48.1 (50),

NH 50.2 (29), NE 36.4 (40), ME 51.1 (28), WA 58.8 (32), KS 38.8 (62),

RI 58.3 (50), DE 56.0 (55), VT 65.2 (31), MA 64.5 (41), AL 35.6 (73), 

OR 56.2 (37), PA 49.6 (61), NJ 57.3 (52), MD 63.8 (61), TN 36.4 (81), NV 51.3 (77), IL 59.0 (71), ID 31.7 (59), MI 49.9 (71), NY 61.3 (62),

GA 47.4 (79), LA 39.8 (89), MS 40.8 (91), AR 35.8 (94), MO 39.9 (94), OH 45.8 (91), IN 40.0 (92), OK 30.7 (96), KY 34.3 (91), WV 27.9 (90),

While the value of this metric is questionable, it's nevertheless worth noting that the bottom ten states all voted for Trump.




From Gallup's website, when reporting on its 2016 well-being index results:

The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index comprises questions measuring five specific elements of well-being:

  • Purpose: liking what you do each day and being motivated to achieve your goals. Top: TX, AZ, MS, SC, AK  Bottom: NY, IN, DE, RI, WV
  • Social: having supportive relationships and love in your life. Top: AK, FL, AZ, NJ, VT Bottom: HI, AR, OK, IN, RI
  • Financial: managing your economic life to reduce stress and increase security. Top: HI, AK, SD, ND, IA  Bottom: OK, AL, LA, MS, WV
  • Community: liking where you live, feeling safe and having pride in your community. Top: HI, SD, MT, ID, WY  Bottom: IL, NV, CT, WV, RI 
  • Physical: having good health and enough energy to get things done daily Top: HI, VT, CO, ME, MA Bottom: AL, AR, OK, KY, WV

(NOTE: The five healthiest voted for Clinton and the five least-healthy voted for Trump!)

Here are the 2016 rankings by state and element

HI 12, 46, 1 ,1, 1  AK 5, 1, 2, 6, 15  SD 8. 29, 3, 2, 16  ME 23 18 10 11 4  CO 18 21 19 14 3

VT 30 5 39 8 2  AZ 2 3 23 19 10  MT 10 28 13 3 33 MN 24 44 6 9 11  TX 1 8 32 20 17

FL 6 2 34 24 8  WY 15 33 15 5 32  CA 13 14 20 35 6  MA 40 10 11 23 5  NE 7 32 8 10 30

ND 16 37 4 7 34  UT 19 27 22 13 27  ID 17 25 44 4 38  IA 22 42 5 12 35  NM 9 24 27 41 9

VA 21 12 14 27 20  NH 38 17 26 16 21  WA 37 23 9 25 23  OR  41 11 18 18 19  NJ 29 4 21 40 7

NC 14 9 41 22 28  SC 4 6 38 17 39  WI 39 39 7 15 31   GA 11 7 42 36 25  PA 27 13 12 32 29

MD 33 20 16 44 12  KS 20 38 17 26 40  NY 46 22 29 43 14  NV 34 34 33 47 26  CT 45 19 37 48 13

MO 31 31 25 30 36   IL 36 26 28 46 24  TN 26 36 36 21 43   MI 42 35 35 34 37   DE 48 15 24 45 22

MS 3 16 49 37 45  RI 49 50 43 50 18  LA 25 30 48 42 41  AL 28 43 47 28 46  OH 43 40 31 39 42

AR 32 47 45 31 47  IN 47 49 30 38 44  OK 35 48 46 33 48  KY 44 41 40 29 49  WV 50 45 50 49 50

The thirteen worst "over-all were Trump states.


Let's single out purpose...

TX AZ MS SC AK FL NE SD NM MT

GA HI CA NC WY ND ID CO UT KS

VA IA ME MN LA TN PA AL NJ VT

MO AR MD NV OK IL WA NH WI MA

OR MI OH KY CT NY IN DE RI WV

WOW, Trump won 10 of 11 and 16 of 20 states whose citizens have the strongest sense of purpose.


Now let's single out social health...

AK FL AZ NJ VT SC GA TX NC MA

OR VA PA CA DE MS NH ME CT MD

CO NY WA NM ID IL UT MT SD LA

MO NE WY NV MI TN ND KS WI OH

KY IA AL MN WV HI AR OK IN RI

Hmmm... Trump won 20 of the 24 least social states...


Let's single out Financial

HI AK SD ND IA MN WI NE WA ME

MA PA MT VA WY MD KS OR CO CA

NJ UT AZ DE MO NH NM IL NY IN

OH TX NV FL MI TN CT SC VT KY

NC GA RI ID AR OK AL LA MS WV

Trump wins 17 of the bottom 21.


Let's single out community...

HI SD MT ID WY AK ND VT MN NE

ME IA UT CO WI NH SC OR AZ TX

TN NC MA FL WA KS VA AL KY MO

AR PA OK MI  CA GA MS IN OH NJ

NM LA NY MD DE IL NV CT WV RI

OK. Trump wins 15 of the top 22, and Clinton 9 of the bottom 11. And so it seems that purpose and community are somewhat tied... WELL, DUH! CHURCH!


Now let's single out physical health...

HI, VT, CO, ME, MA, CA, NJ, FL, NM, AZ,

MN MD CT NY AK SD TX RI OR VA

NH DE WA IL GA NV UT NC PA NE

WI WY MT ND IA MO MI ID SC KS

LA OH TN IN MS AL AR OK KY WV

THE 24 LEAST HEALTHY STATES VOTED FOR TRUMP!

Hawaii residents lead the nation in the financial, community and physical elements, while Alaska leads in social well-being and Texas leads in purpose well-being. Arizona is among the top three states in social and purpose well-being.

West Virginians have the lowest well-being in three of the five elements: physical, financial and purpose. Rhode Island has the lowest well-being in the remaining two elements: community and social well-being.

In addition to West Virginia and Rhode Island, Oklahoma ranks among the bottom five states in three elements of well-being, and Arkansas, Indiana and Alabama do so for two elements each.

Nationally, many aspects of well-being improved last year to their best levels since Gallup-Healthways measurement began in 2008. For example, the percentage of Americans rating their lives well enough to be classified as “thriving” reached a record high of 55.4% in 2016. The percentage of Americans without health insurance fell to 10.9%, its lowest measured level. The adult smoking rate dropped to 18.0%, down from 21.1% at the onset of the Well-Being Index in 2008. And the Gallup Standard of Living Index reached a high of +50.

But not all trends have been positive. Americans’ assessments of their own health have worsened, while the percentages of adults who are obese or who have been diagnosed with diabetes are at new highs. The percentage of Americans who have been diagnosed with depression, too, has reached its highest level in 2016.

Improvements in well-being at the national level are driven by improvements at the state and local levels. Hawaii, Alaska, South Dakota, Colorado, Montana and Minnesota have consistently been among the highest well-being states and thus set a standard for the rest of the states to follow. Other states like California, Texas and Florida have had much stronger showings in the last few years, demonstrating that improvement over time is possible.



Final D. Still, let's add re-add up this metric, omitting the physical and financial aspects of the metric. In other words, this metric is now Social health as expressed through a sense of purpose, a strong social life, and a sense of community.

DC (NA) 90.9
AK (12) 41.6, AZ (24) 48.1, SC (27) 42.6, TX (29) 45.2, FL (32) 49.4, SD (39) 34.0, MT (41) 38.9, VT (43) 65.2, NC (45) 48.1, ID (48) 31.7,

NE (49) 36.4, ME (52) 51.1, CO (53) 52.7, WY (53) 24.3, GA (54) 47.4, MS (56) 40.8, HI (59) 67.5, UT (59) 37.7, VA (60) 52.9, ND (60) 30.2,

CA (62) 66.1,
OR (70) 56.2, NH (71) 50.2, PA (72) 49.6, MA (73) 64.5, 

NJ (73) 57.3,
NM (74) 54.7, IA (76) 44.9, MN (77) 50.8, TN (83) 36.4,

KS (84) 38.8, WA (85) 58.8, MO (92) 39.9, WI (93) 49.6, MD (97) 63.8, LA (97) 39.8, AL (99) 35.6, IL (108) 59.0, DE (108) 56.0, AR (110) 35.8,

NY (111) 61.3,
MI (111) 49.9, CT (112) 57.2, KY (114) 34.3, NV (115) 51.3, OK (116) 30.7, OH (122) 45.8, IN (134) 40.0, WV (144) 27.9, RI (149) 58.3,

Now let's compare that with a similar list on CNBC's website, which purported to rank the states by "quality of life."

DC (NA) 90.9,
HI 67.5, MN 50.8, VT 65.2, NH 50.2, ME 51.1, OR 56.2, ND 30.2, WA 58.8, IA 44.9, MT 38.9,

WY 24.3,
CO 52.7, UT 37.7, SD 34.0, WI 49.6, VA 52.9, MA 64.5, NE 36.4, NJ 57.3, AK 41.6, 

ID 31.7, NY 61.3, CA 66.1, RI 58.3, CT 57.2,

FL 49.4, MD 63.8, DE 56.0, PA 49.6, NC 48.1,

SC 42.6,
MI 49.9, AZ 48.1, OH 45.8, IL 59.0, NM 54.7, KS 38.8, GA 47.4, TX 45.2,WV 27.9,

NV 51.3,
KY 34.3, AL 35.6, MS 40.8, IN 40.0, TN 36.4, LA 39.8, OK 30.7, MO 39.9, AR 35.8,

Well, there it is again. The bottom nine voted for Trump. Nineteen of the bottom twenty-two voted for Trump.  Seven of the top eight, and seventeen of the top twenty-eight, voted for Clinton.

And here is a second list in order of quality of life, with a focus on the quality of life of senior citizens and retired people.

NY 61.3, MN 50.8, MA 64.5, PA 49.6, WI 49.6, IA 44.9, ME 51.1, CA 66.1, NV 51.3, VT 65.2,

FL 49.4, MI 49.9, CT 57.2, KS 38.8, IL 59.0, AZ 48.1, CO 52.7, MO 39.9, NH 50.2, WA 58.8, 

MD 63.8, OH 45.8, VA 52.9, MT 38.9, WY 24.3,

NC 48.1, NJ 57.3, NE 36.4, IN 40.0, OR 56.2,

ID 31.7,
GA 47.4, SD 34.0, HI 67.5, UT 37.7, TX 45.2, SC 42.6, TN 36.4, OK 30.7, DE 56.0,

NM 54.7, ND 30.2, LA 39.8, WV 27.9, KY 34.3, RI 58.3, AL 35.6, AR 35.8, MS 40.8, AK 41.6, DC 90.9,

Here, then is the combined rankings of the original Gallup list with these two other lists.

DC (NA) 90.9,

MN 50.8 (13), IA 44.9 (28), WI 49.6 (32), CO 52.7 (33), ME 51.1 (35), HI 67.5 (36), MT 38.9 (37), VT 65.2 (41), WY 24.3 (41), CA 66.1 (42),

MA 64.5 (44), NH 50.2 (48), FL 49.4 (51), WA 58.8 (52), SD 34.0 (53), VA 52.9 (55), UT 37.7 (56), CT 57.2 (57), AZ 48.1 (58), NY 61.3 (63),

ND 30.2 (64),
PA 49.6 (65), OR 56.2 (67), NE 36.4 (68), AK 41.6 (72),

NC 48.1 (76), KS 38.8 (76), NJ 57.3 (79), MD 63.8 (82), MI 49.9 (83), 
 
TX 45.2 (85),
SC 42.6 (85), IL 59.0 (86), NV 51.3 (86), ID 31.7 (90), DE 56.0 (95), NM 54.7 (95), RI 58.3 (96), GA 47.4 (111), MO 39.9 (112),

OH 45.8 (113), TN (119) 36.4, AL 35.6 (120), IN 40.0 (121), LA 39.8 (132), WV 27.9 (134), OK 30.7 (135), KY 34.3 (136), MS 40.8 (140), AR 35.8 (142),

So that's fairly convincing. Clinton won 8 of the 12 states with the highest quality of life, and 20 of 38. And Trump won the bottom 12. 


Total of Rankings for A-D (Health and Health Care)

DC (8, 1 NA) 90.9, VT (38) 65.2, MA (38) 64.5, HI (47) 67.5, MN (47) 50.8, NJ (48) 57.3, CA (59) 66.1, CT (59) 57.2, NE (60) 36.4, SD (61) 34.0,
Avg. for the top ten

NY (62) 61.3, NH (73) 50.2, CO (77) 52.7, ME (79) 51.5, IA (79) 44.9, ND (79) 30.2, MD (80) 63.8, WI (80) 49.6, FL (83) 49.4, VA (90) 52.9,
Avg. for the second ten

TX (90) 45.2, AZ (93) 48.1, AK (94) 41.6, PA (95) 49.6, IL (96) 59.0,

WA (99) 58.8,
RI (99) 58.3, UT (100) 37.7, NC (101) 48.1, GA (106) 47.4,
Avg. for the third ten

SC (108) 42.6, ID (111) 31.7, MT (114) 38.9, DE (117) 56.0, OR (121) 56.2, MI (123) 49.9, WY (127) 24.3, NM (133) 54.7, KS (137) 38.8, MS (140) 40.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

LA (143) 39.8, OH (145) 45.8, MO (146) 39.9, TN (152) 36.4, IN (161) 40.0, AL (169) 35.6, AR (171) 35.8, KY (172) 34.3, NV (174) 51.3, OK (180) 30.7, WV (189) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Now, on first glance, this is pretty impressive. 12 of the 14 healthiest states and districts voted for Clinton, and 20 of the 24 least healthy states voted for Trump. This lends some credence to the theory those voting for Trump did so in a desperate attempt to improve their lives. But what's up with Nevada, New Mexico, and Oregon? These are largely rural states, with high rates of suicide. Why did they vote for Clinton?

Were they so satisfied with the economy that they were afraid of making a change? I mean, really, 20 of the 24 LEAST healthy states voted for a man who wanted to roll back all the recent advances in health care, and replace it with something "better"?  That was never revealed or even explained? Could they really be that stupid?



Finding #8: The economy was a factor in the election, but it was not THE factor.

Was the State of the Economy a Key Factor in the Election?

A-F Prosperity

A. So now, let's look at economic might as a factor instead of population density. Let's list the 2015 rankings of the 51 states and districts by GSP per capita, in thousands, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, alongside the percentage of voters in these states voting for Clinton. .

DC (181.2) 90.9, AK (81.8) 41.6, NY (73.0) 61.3, CT (72.3) 57.2, ND (70.9) 30.2, DE (69.9) 56.0, MA (69.7) 64.5, WY (68.5) 24.3, NJ (64.1) 57.3, WA (62.2) 58.8,
Avg. for the top ten 54.2%

CA (61.9) 66.1, MN (60.3) 50.8, MD (60.1) 63.8, TX (60.0) 45.2, IL (59.5) 59.0, NE (59.2) 36.4, CO (58.0) 52.7, VA (56.9) 52.9, OR (56.0) 56.2, HI (55.6) 67.5,
Avg. for the second ten 55.1%

LA (54.2) 39.8, NH (53.8) 50.2, RI (53.3) 58.3, PA (52.9) 49.6, IA (52.8) 44.9

Well, that's interesting. Even though the second ten voted for Clinton in larger numbers than the first ten, the economy would appear to have been a factor in the election. Clinton won 17 of the 23 most successful states, but only 4 of the remaining 28. Trump, apparently, spoke to these states and offered them real hope for economic improvement. In support, look at the states that didn't vote for Clinton, even though they were doing well. These were primarily rural states, whose success had more to do with their exploitation of natural resources than industrial strength. Perhaps, then, some of the top states voted for Clinton because they were doing well and didn't see the need to shake things up, and some of the top states voted against Clinton because they were afraid she'd shake things up.

WI (51.9) 49.6, SD (51.5) 34.0, OH (51.0) 45.8, KS (50.2) 38.8, NC (50.2) 48.1,
Avg. for the third ten 46.0%

IN (49.3) 40.0, UT (49.0) 37.7, NV (48.6) 51.3, GA (48.6) 47.4, VT (47.5) 65.2, MO (47.2) 39.9, MI (46.6) 49.9, TN (46.5) 36.4, OK (46.3) 30.7, MT (44.3) 38.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten 43.7%

AZ (43.3) 48.1, AL (42.7) 35.6, FL (42.6) 49.4, KY (41.6) 34.3, NM (41.6) 54.7, ME (41.5) 51.5
AR (41.1) 35.8, SC (40.2) 42.6, ID (39.4) 31.7, WV (38.6) 27.9, MS (35.7) 40.8
Avg. for the final eleven 41.1%

And yet, look at Maine, New Mexico and Vermont. Why did they vote for Clinton?

And why did relatively successful states like Alaska and North Dakota vote for Trump?

B. So now, let's look at the 2015 rankings of the 51 states and districts by the percentage of millionaire households, according to this list, alongside the percentage of voters in these states voting for Clinton. .

MD (60.1) 63.8, CT (7.30) 57.2, HI (7.25) 67.5, NJ (7.24) 57.3, AK (6.85) 41.6, MA (6.81) 64.5, NH (6.80) 50.2, VA (6.73) 52.9, DE (6.38) 56.0, DC (6.29) 90.9,
Avg. for the top ten

MN (6.0) 50.8, VT (5.92) 65.2, CA (5.90) 66.1, CO (5.89) 52.7, NY (5.84) 61.3, WY (5.83) 24.3, WA (5.82) 58.8, ND (5.81) 30.2, RI (5.81) 58.3, IL (5.73) 59.0,
Avg. for the second ten

PA (5.43) 49.6, UT (5.38) 37.7, IA (5.29) 44.9, NE (5.21) 36.4, TX (5.11) 45.2,

SD (5.0) 34.0, KS (5.07) 38.8, WI (4.99) 49.6, ME (4.96) 51.5, OR (4.93) 56.2,
Avg. for the third ten

FL (4.89) 49.4, NM (4.85) 54.7, MT (4.84) 38.9, MI (4.82) 49.9, AZ (4.79) 48.1, OH (4.77) 45.8,
GA (4.67) 47.4, IN (4.62) 40.0, MO (4.61) 39.9, LA (4.59) 39.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

NV (4.57) 51.3, OK (4.55) 30.7, SC (4.51) 42.6, NC (4.50) 48.1, TN (4.43) 36.4, AL (4.42) 35.6, ID (4.38) 31.7, WV (4.33) 27.9, KY (4.23) 34.3, AR (4.13) 35.8, MS (3.94) 40.8
Avg. for the final eleven


C. Well, perhaps there was a wide disparity within these seemingly successful states between the haves and have-nots. If so, this could help explain why some seemingly successful states voted for Trump. This list reflecting the average income in thousands for the 99% least successful families of each state was consulted to see if this was true.

AK (63.2) 41.6, DC (63.1) 90.9, ND (61.2) 30.2, MD (60.2) 63.8, NJ (57.4) 57.3, NE (57.1) 36.4, NH (56.5) 50.2, CT (56.4) 57.2, MA (56.1) 64.5, VA (55.7) 52.9,
Avg. for the top ten %

CO (54.8) 52.7,
SD (53.2) 34.0, MN (52.7) 50.8, WY (52.2) 24.3, IA (51.2) 44.9, HI (51.0) 67.5, WA (50.4) 58.8, KS (50.4) 38.8, UT (50.4) 37.7, CA (48.9) 66.1,
Avg. for the second ten %

IL (48.7) 59.0, DE (48.4) 56.0, TX (48.35) 45.2, RI (47.5) 58.3, WI (46.7) 49.6, 

PA (45.8) 49.6, VT (45.7) 65.2, ID (45.3) 31.7, OK (44.8) 30.7, NY (44.2) 61.3, 
Avg. for the third ten %

IN (43.4) 40.0, OH (42.4) 45.8, NC (42.2) 48.1, MT (42.0) 38.9, MO (41.6) 39.9, LA (41.6) 39.8, ME (41.2) 51.5, TN (41.2) 36.4, OR (40.7) 56.2, GA (40.1) 47.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten %

AL (38.9) 35.6, AZ (38.4) 48.1, NM (38.0) 54.7, MI (37.9) 49.9, KY (37.4) 34.3, FL (36.5) 49.4,
SC (36.45) 42.6, AR (36.4) 35.8, NV (36.2) 51.3, WV (34.4) 27.9, MS (33.4) 40.8
Avg. for the final eleven %

So there it is again. It's suggestive but not definitive. 17 of the 21 states with the lowest incomes for the bottom 99% voted for Trump. But why did any of them vote for Clinton? And why did some of the strongest economies vote for Trump?

D. Perhaps, then, the voters in the low income states voting for Trump just didn't worry about money the way most others do. So let's look at the states in order of least worry to most worry, according to this 2016 Gallup poll. (which has been averaged out with the 2015 poll

DC (NA)
1-10: AK (28.2, 29.8 = 29) 41.6, ND (28.4, 30.2 = 29.3) 30.2, MN (31.1, 30.2 = 30.65) 50.8, SD (31.9, 30.9 = 31.4) 34.0, IA (32.0, 32.5 = 32.25) 44.9, HI (35.0, 29.6 = 32.3) 67.5, MT (33.2, 32.2 = 32.7) 38.9, WI (33.6, 32.1 = 32.85) 49.6, WA (32.9, 33.1 = 33) 58.8, MD (33.6, 32.6 = 33.1) 63.8,

11-20:
PA (34.5, 33.1 = 33.8) 49.6, WY (35.7, 31.9 = 33.8) 24.3, VA (34.0, 33.7 = 33.85) 52.9,
KS (34.5, 33.2 = 33.85) 38.8, NE (35.9, 32.3 = 34.1) 36.4, AZ (35.5, 32.8 = 34.15) 48.1, MI (34.2, 34.2 = 34.2) 49.9, NJ (35.0, 34.1 = 34.55) 57.3, MO (35.3, 33.8 = 34.55) 39.9, MA (35.1, 34.3 = 34.7) 64.5,

21-25: DE (35.9, 33.5 = 34.7) 56.0,
CO (34.7, 34.9 = 34.8) 52.7, IL (34.9, 35.0 = 34.95) 59.0, KY (35.9, 34.0 = 34.95) 34.3, CA (35.3, 34.7 = 35.0) 66.1,

26-30:
FL (35.0, 35.1 = 35.05) 49.4, SC (36.6, 33.8 = 35.2) 42.6, NC (35.8, 34.7 = 35.25) 48.1, OR (36.5, 33.9 = 35.35) 56.2, OH (35.2, 35.6 = 35.4) 45.8,

31-40: TX (36.0, 35.1 = 35.55) 45.2, IN (35.7, 35.4 = 35.55) 40.0, AL (35.5, 35.7 = 35.6) 35.6, TN (36.1, 35.6 = 35.85) 36.4, NH (34.5, 36.3 = 35.9) 50.2, CT (34.7, 37.2 = 35.95) 57.2, NY (36.4, 35.7 = 36.05) 61.3, NV (37.9, 34.4 = 36.15) 51.3, ME (37.8, 34.7 = 36.25) 51.5, NM (36.5, 36.2 = 36.35) 54.7,

41-50: GA (38.7, 34.4 = 36.55) 47.4, UT (38.0, 35.1 = 36.55) 37.7, OK (38.1, 35.1 = 36.6) 30.7, AR (37.1, 36.6 = 36.85) 35.8, RI (37.0, 37.8 = 37.4) 58.3, LA (37.6, 37.8 = 37.7) 39.8, VT (35.6, 40.4 = 38) 65.2, MS (38.7, 37.9 = 38.3) 40.8, ID (39.8, 38.0 = 38.9) 31.7, WV (39.3, 40.0 = 39.65) 27.9,


No, that's not it. While the states most worried about money turned out for Trump there was no corresponding surge for Clinton in the states least worried about money. In fact, a number of the states won by Trump by close margins, e.g. IA, WI, MI, PA, FL, and OH, were among the states LEAST worried about money. This casts serious doubt as to the veracity of one of the stories spun by pundit after pundit (or should I say spundit?) after the election--that Clinton lost the election because she failed to realize it was really about jobs, and not about civil rights, or notions of common decency, etc... That is, if she'd only overlooked Trump's awful and insulting behavior to minorities and women and instead stuck to the basics--jobs and the economy--she would have won over all those disenfranchised white male voters in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Ohio. In any event, this study gives us reason to suspect this is nonsense. 

Well, then, how about economic might in GSP when combined with a metric representing independence from the Federal Govt.? (This site was referenced in the development of this list.)

DC (NA) 90.9, CT (4 + 2 = 6) 57.2, DE (7 + 1 = 8) 56.0, NJ (8 + 3 = 11) 57.3, AK (2 + 11 = 13) 41.6, CA (10 + 5 = 15) 66.1, NY (5 + 10 = 15) 61.3, MA (6 + 13 = 19) 64.5, MN (13 + 8 = 21) 50.8, WA (9 + 15 = 24) 58.8,
Avg. for the top ten

NH (20 + 9 = 29) 50.2, VA (17 + 12 = 29) 52.9, CO (15 + 16 = 31) 52.7, IL (16 + 16 = 32) 59.0, KS (28 + 4 = 32) 38.8, TX (11 + 22 = 33) 45.2, NE ( 14 + 19 = 33)) 36.4, HI (21 + 14 = 35) 67.5, ND (1 + 36 = 37) 30.2, NV (31 + 7 = 38) 51.3,

Avg. for the second ten

WY (3 + 35 = 38) 24.3, IA (19 + 20 = 39) 44.9, MD (12 + 29 = 41) 63.8, WI (25 + 17 = 42) 49.6, PA (24 + 23 = 47) 49.6

OR (18 + 32 = 50) 56.2,
UT (32 + 18 = 50) 37.7, RI (23 + 28 = 51) 58.3, OH (27 + 26 = 53) 45.8, NC (29 + 25 = 54) 48.1,

Avg. for the third ten

FL (42 + 21 = 63) 49.4, IN (30 + 33 = 63) 40.0, VT (34 + 30 = 64) 65.2, MI (37 + 27 = 64) 49.9, SD (22 + 44 = 66) 34.0, OK (36 + 31 = 67) 30.7, AR (46 + 24 = 70) 35.8, GA (33 + 40 = 73) 47.4, LA (26 + 47 = 73) 39.8, MO (35 + 40 = 75) 39.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

AZ (40 + 38 = 78) 48.1, ID (49 + 34 = 83) 31.7, ME (45 + 39 = 84) 51.5, TN (38 + 46 = 84) 36.4, KY (41 + 43 = 84) 34.3, SC (48 + 37 = 85) 42.6, NM (39 + 49 = 88) 54.7, MT (43 + 45 = 88) 38.9, WV (47 + 42 = 89) 27.9, AL (44 + 48 = 92) 35.6, MS (50 + 50 = 100) 40.8
Avg. for the final eleven


E. Cost of living, according to this chart... (The numbers reported are the index--an amalgamation of a number of costs that roughly reflect the percent of the average cost of living of 1.0.)

MS (86.0) 40.8, IN (87.9) 40.0, MI (88.2) 49.9, AR (88.5) 45.8, OK (88.6) 30.7, ID (89.6) 31.7, TN (89.8) 36.4, KS (90.4) 38.8, TX (90.7) 45.2, KY (90.8) 34.3,

MO (90.8) 39.9, AL (91.2) 45.6, NE (91.3) 36.4, GA (91.4) 47.4, IA (91.7) 44.9, WY (91.7) 24.3, UT (92.8) 37.7, OH (93.0) 45.8, NC (94.2) 48.1, LA (94.4) 39.8,

IL (95.5) 59.0, WV (95.7) 27.9, NM (95.7) 54.7, WI (96.9) 49.6, AZ (98.1) 48.1,

ND (98.9) 30.2, FL (99.0) 49.4, VA (100.2) 52.9, SC (100.5) 42.6, MT (100.8) 38.9,

MN (101.1) 50.8, CO (102.1) 52.7, DE (102.6) 56.0, SD (102.8) 34.0, PA (102.8) 49.6, NV (104.5) 51.3, WA (107.1) 58.8, ME (112.0) 51.5, OR (115.4) 56.2, NH (119.2) 50.2.

NJ (121.0) 57.3, RI (122.1) 58.3, VT (122.4) 65.2, MD (125.0) 63.8, CT (130.7) 57.2, AK (131.6) 41.6, MA (134.7) 64.5, CA (134.8) 66.1, NY (135.2) 61.3, DC (149.2), HI (167.4) 67.5

F. Highest state taxes. This list by Forbes reflects the taxes collected at the state level, by income tax, sales tax, corporate tax, etc. 

NOTE: when adding this in, it should be added in in reverse order so that the most highly-taxed gets a 50...

DC (NA)
NY (12.7) 61.3, CT (12.6) 57.2, NJ (12.2) 57.3, WI (11.0) 49.6, IL (11.0) 59.0, CA (11.0) 66.1, MD (10.9) 63.8, MN (10.8) 50.8, RI (10.8) 58.3, OR (10.3) 56.2,
Avg. for the top ten

VT (10.3) 65.2, MA (10.3) 64.5, ME (10.2) 51.5, HI (10.2) 67.5, PA (10.2) 49.6, DE (10.2) 56.0, AR (10.1) 35.8, WV (9.8) 27.9, OH (9.8) 45.8, NC (9.8) 48.1,
Avg. for the second ten

UT (9.6) 37.7, IN (9.5) 40.0, KS (9.5) 38.8, KY (9.5) 34.3, MI (9.4) 49.9,

ID (9.3) 31.7, VA (9.3) 52.9, WA (9.3) 58.8, MO (9.3) 39.9, NE (9.2) 36.4,
Avg. for the third ten

IA (9.2) 44.9, GA (9.1) 47.4, ND (9.0) 30.2, FL (8.9) 49.4, CO (8.9) 52.7, AZ (8.8) 48.1, NM (8.7) 54.7, MT (8.7) 38.9, AL (8.7) 35.6, OK (8.6) 30.7,  
Avg. for the fourth ten

MS (8.6) 40.8, SC (8.4) 42.6, NV (8.1) 51.3, NH (7.9) 50.2, LA  (7.6) 39.8, TX (7.6) 45.2, TN (7.3) 36.4, WY (7.1) 24.3, SD (7.1) 34.0, AK (6.5) 41.6,
Avg. for bottom ten


G. Well, let's try this, then.  Perhaps they have an unusually low unemployment rate and/or poverty rate. Let's look, then, at the states and how they voted, alongside their unemployment rates in numbers of unemployed per one hundred and poverty rates in numbers of people living below the poverty line per one hundred. (This list was created with the help of this chart, and this chart.)

For the Prosperity metric, then, we will sort this list by the poverty rate.

NH (2.8 + 9.2 = 12.0) 50.2, MD (4.2 + 10.4 = 14.6) 63.8,
WY (5.1 + 10.6 = 15.7) 24.3, CT (5.1 + 10.8 = 15.9) 57.2, NJ (5.2 + 11.1 = 16.3) 57.3, ND (3.0 + 11.1 = 14.1) 30.2, MN (4.0 + 11.4 = 15.4) 50.8, AK (6.8 + 11.4 = 18.2) 41.6, HI (3.2 + 11.5 = 14.7) 67.5, MA (3.3 + 11.7 = 15.0) 64.5,
Avg. for the top ten

VA (4.2 + 11.8 = 16.0) 52.9, UT (3.2 + 11.8 = 15.0) 37.7, CO (3.5 + 12.1 = 15.6) 52.7, VT (3.3 + 12.2 = 15.5) 65.2, IA (4.1 + 12.3 = 16.4) 44.9, NE (3.3 + 12.3 = 15.6) 36.4, DE (4.3 + 13.0 = 17.3) 56.0, WA (5.4 + 13.2 = 18.6) 58.8, WI (4.1 + 13.2 = 17.3) 49.6, KS (4.4 + 13.5 = 17.9) 38.8,
Avg. for the second then

PA (5.8 + 13.6 = 19.4) 49.6, ME (4.0 + 14.0 = 18.0) 51.5, IL (5.6 + 14.3 = 19.9) 59.0, RI (5.5 + 14.8 = 20.3) 58.3, ID (3.8 + 14.8 = 18.6) 31.7,

IN (4.4 + 15.2 = 19.6) 40.0, MT (4.3 + 15.2 = 19.5) 38.9, NV (5.5 + 15.4 = 20.9) 51.3, MO (5.1 + 15.5 = 20.6) 39.9, OH (4.9 + 15.8 = 20.7) 45.8,
Avg. for the third ten

NY (5.2 + 15.9 = 21.1) 61.3, SD (2.8 + 16.1 = 18.9) 34.0, MI (4.7 + 16.2 = 20.9) 49.9, CA (5.5 + 16.4 = 21.9) 66.1, OR (5.3 + 16.4 = 21.7) 56.2, FL (4.8 + 16.6 = 21.4) 49.4, OK (5.2 + 16.6 = 21.8) 30.7, NC (4.9 + 17.2 = 22.1) 48.1, TX (4.7 + 17.2 = 21.9) 45.2, SC (4.7 + 17.3 = 22.0) 42.6,
Avg. for the fourth ten

AZ (5.2 + 18.2 = 23.4) 48.1, TN (4.8 + 18.2 = 23.0) 36.4, WV (6.0 + 18.3 = 24.3) 27.9, DC (6.1 + 18.4 = 24.5) 90.9, GA (5.2 + 18.4 = 23.6) 47.4, AR (4.0 + 18.7 = 22.7) 35.8, KY (5.1 + 19.0 = 24.1) 34.3, AL (5.7 + 19.2 = 24.9) 35.6, LA (6.3 + 19.9 = 26.2) 39.8, NM (6.7 + 20.6 = 27.3) 54.7, MS (5.9 + 21.9 = 27.8) 40.8,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Total Rankings for A-G (Shared Prosperity)

AK (64) 41.6, ND (68) 30.2, WY (73) 24.3, NE (111) 36.4, VA (112) 52.9, MD (118) 63.8, IA (118) 44.9, NH (119) 50.2, MN (120) 50.8, CO (125) 52.7,
Avg. for the top ten

NJ (130) 57.3, WA (132) 58.8, SD (137) 34.0, HI (138) 67.5, MA (138) 64.5, DE (143) 56.0, KS (144) 38.8, TX (146) 45.2, CT (148) 57.2, DC (107 2 NA) 90.9,
Avg. for the second ten

IL (169) 59.0, PA (174) 49.6, UT (174) 37.7, WI (177) 49.6, MT (184) 38.9,

IN (189) 40.0, MO (191) 39.9, MI (194) 49.9, CA (196) 66.1, OH (206) 45.8,
Avg. for the third ten

OK (206) 30.7, TN (208) 36.4, NY (215) 61.3, AZ (215) 48.1, VT (218) 65.2, LA (218) 39.8, RI (219) 58.3, NC (223) 48.1, FL (226) 49.4, ID (229) 31.7, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

GA (230) 47.4, OR (232) 56.2, NV (233) 51.3, AL (234) 35.6, SC (243) 42.6, KY (246) 34.3, NM (247) 54.7, ME (249) 51.5, MS (263) 40.8, AR (273) 35.8, WV (295) 27.9,
Avg. for the final eleven




DO NOT COUNT

G. For the Security metric let's sort it out by the unemployment rate. (This list was created with the help of this chart, and this chart.)


NH (2.8 + 9.2 = 12.0) 50.2, ND (3.0 + 11.1 = 14.1) 30.2, MD (4.2 + 10.4 = 14.6) 63.8, HI (3.2 + 11.5 = 14.7) 67.5, MA (3.3 + 11.7 = 15.0) 64.5, UT (3.2 + 11.8 = 15.0) 37.7, MN (4.0 + 11.4 = 15.4) 50.8, VT (3.3 + 12.2 = 15.5) 65.2, CO (3.5 + 12.1 = 15.6) 52.7, NE (3.3 + 12.3 = 15.6) 36.4,

Avg. for the top ten 51.8%

WY (5.1 + 10.6 = 15.7) 24.3, CT (5.1 + 10.8 = 15.9) 57.2, VA (4.2 + 11.8 = 16.0) 52.9, NJ (5.2 + 11.1 = 16.3) 57.3, IA (4.1 + 12.3 = 16.4) 44.9, DE (4.3 + 13.0 = 17.3) 56.0, WI (4.1 + 13.2 = 17.3) 49.6, KS (4.4 + 13.5 = 17.9) 38.8, ME (4.0 + 14.0 = 18.0) 51.5, AK (6.8 + 11.4 = 18.2) 41.6   

Avg. for the second then 47.4%

WA (5.4 + 13.2 = 18.6) 58.8,
ID (3.8 + 14.8 = 18.6) 31.7, SD (2.8 + 16.1 = 18.9) 34.0, PA (5.8 + 13.6 = 19.4) 49.6, MT (4.3 + 15.2 = 19.5) 38.9,

OK. Vermont and Maine did well on this chart. Clinton won ten of the fourteen least miserable states. And thirteen of the twenty one least miserable states.

IN (4.4 + 15.2 = 19.6) 40.0, IL (5.6 + 14.3 = 19.9) 59.0, RI (5.5 + 14.8 = 20.3) 58.3, MO (5.1 + 15.5 = 20.6) 39.9, OH (4.9 + 15.8 = 20.7) 45.8,

Avg. for the third ten 45.6%

NV (5.5 + 15.4 = 20.9) 51.3,
MI (4.7 + 16.2 = 20.9) 49.9, NY (5.2 + 15.9 = 21.1) 61.3, FL (4.8 + 16.6 = 21.4) 49.4, OR (5.3 + 16.4 = 21.7) 56.2, OK (5.2 + 16.6 = 21.8) 30.7, CA (5.5 + 16.4 = 21.9) 66.1, TX (4.7 + 17.2 = 21.9) 45.2, SC (4.7 + 17.3 = 22.0) 42.6, NC (4.9 + 17.2 = 22.1) 48.1,

Avg. for the fourth ten 50.1%

AR (4.0 + 18.7 = 22.7) 35.8, TN (4.8 + 18.2 = 23.0) 36.4, AZ (5.2 + 18.2 = 23.4) 48.1, GA (5.2 + 18.4 = 23.6) 47.4, KY (5.1 + 19.0 = 24.1) 34.3, WV (6.0 + 18.3 = 24.3) 27.9, DC (6.1 + 18.4 = 24.5) 90.9, AL (5.7 + 19.2 = 24.9) 35.6, LA (6.3 + 19.9 = 26.2) 39.8, NM (6.7 + 20.6 = 27.3) 54.7, MS (5.9 + 21.9 = 27.8) 40.8,

Avg. for the bottom eleven 44.7%

Security

A. Percentage of unemployed, underemployed, and discouraged workers (U-6), as per this list.

SD (5.2) 34.0, NE (6.2) 36.4, ND (6.2) 30.2, NH (6.4) 50.2, VT (7.1) 65.2, IA (7.2) 44.9, CO (7.3) 52.7, HI (7.5) 67.5, UT (7.5) 37.7, AR (7.5) 35.8,
Avg. for the top ten

MN (7.7) 50.8,
MO (7.8) 39.9, ID (7.8) 31.7, WI (7.9) 49.6, MD (8.1) 63.8, MA (8.1) 64.5, KS (8.2) 38.8, DE (8.3) 56.0, IN (8.3) 40.0, MT (8.5) 38.9,
Avg. for the second ten

TX (8.6) 45.2, ME (8.7) 51.5, VA (9.1) 52.9, OK (9.2) 30.7, NY (9.4) 61.3,

NC (9.4) 48.1, TN (9.4) 36.4, DC (9.5) 90.9, NJ (9.7) 57.3, OH (9.7) 45.8, 
Avg. for the third ten

SC (9.7) 42.6, KY (9.7) 34.3, RI (10.1) 58.3, WY (10.1) 24.3, WA (10.3) 58.8, OR (10.3) 56.2, MI (10.3) 49.9, FL (10.3) 49.4, AL (10.4) 35.6, GA (10.5) 47.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten

PA (10.6) 49.6, LA (10.7) 39.8, CT (10.8) 57.2, AZ (10.8) 48.1, MS (10.9) 40.8, IL (11.0) 59.0, WV (11.0) 27.9, CA (11.3) 66.1, NV (12.2) 51.3, NM (12.6) 54.7, AK (12.8) 41.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

B. So now the thought occurs that the key issue in the election wasn't unemployment, per se, but white unemployment. Unemployed minority voters, after all, were unlikely to vote for Trump, even as a protest, due to some of his comments. So let's look at the unemployment percentage among white workers in each state in relation to the percentage of voters for Clinton. (This list is based on this list.)

SD (1.4) 34.0, NE (2.2) 36.4, DC (2.3%) 90.9, CO (2.3) 52.7, ND (2.6) 30.2, MD (2.8) 63.8, NH (2.8) 50.2, AR (2.8) 35.8, MN (2.9) 50.8, IA (2.9) 44.9,

Avg. for the top ten 49.0%

VA (3.1) 52.9,
VT (3.3) 65.2, KS (3.3) 38.8, OK (3.4) 30.7, ME (3.5) 51.5, TX (3.5) 45.2, UT (3.5) 37.7, GA (3.6) 47.4, NY (3.7) 61.3, MI (3.7) 49.9, 

Avg. for the second ten 48.0%

WI (3.7) 49.6, MO (3.7) 39.9, ID (3.7) 31.7, MA (3.8) 64.5, LA (3.8) 39.8,

NJ (3.9) 57.3, NM (3.9) 54.7, PA (3.9) 49.6, CT (4.0) 57.2, FL (4.1) 49.4,

Avg. for the third ten 49.4%

MT (4.0) 38.9, AZ (4.1) 48.1, RI (4.2) 58.3, DE (4.2) 56.0, SC (4.2) 42.6, CA (4.3) 66.1, OH (4.3) 45.8, NC (4.4) 48.1, IN (4.4) 40.0, TN (4.4) 36.4,

Avg. for the fourth ten 48.0%

AL (4.4) 35.6, OR (4.6) 56.2, WY (4.7) 24.3, HI (4.8) 67.5, WA (4.8) 58.8, NV (4.9) 51.3, IL (5.0) 59.0, AK (5.0) 41.6, MS (5.1) 40.8, KY (5.4) 34.3, WV (6.6) 27.9,  

Avg. for the bottom eleven 45.2%

Well, this is almost random, isn't it? So much for white unemployment being a key factor in the race.

Uninsured rate among white citizens by state, per this list

1-10: MA (2.17) 64.5, MN (3.03) 50.8, CT (3.29) 57.2, MD (3.31) 63.8, RI (3.71) 58.3, IA (3.77) 44.9, VT (3.79) 65.2, HI (3.95) 67.5, IL (4.06) 59.0, NY (4.18) 61.3,

11-20: WI (4.26) 49.6,
DE (4.42) 56.0, NJ (4.44) 57.3, CA (4.54) 66.1, WA (4.59) 58.8, PA (5.24) 49.6, KY (5.25) 34.3, MI (5.29) 49.9, CO (5.36) 52.7, OR (5.41) 56.2,

21-25: OH (5.80) 45.8,
NH (5.83) 50.2,
ND (5.85) 30.2, WV (5.87) 27.9, NE (5.99) 36.4,

26-30: AZ (6.14) 48.1, 
KS (6.39) 38.8, VA (6.53) 52.9, SD (6.56) 34.0, NM (6.65) 54.7,

31-40: UT (7.13) 37.7,
NV (7.29) 51.3, AR (7.62) 35.8, NC (8.04) 48.1, AL (8.04) 35.6, ME (8.09) 51.5, IN (8.22) 40.0, TN (8.25) 36.4, MO (8.69) 39.9, SC (8.86) 42.6, 

41-50: ID (8.91) 31.7,
TX (9.28) 45.2,
LA (9.33) 39.8, FL (9.47) 49.4, MT (9.60) 38.9, WY (9.69) 24.3, OK (9.86) 30.7, GA (10.12) 47.4, AK (10.29) 41.6, MS (10.91) 40.8, 


Uninsured rate among nonelderly women by state, per this list

1-10: DC (4) 90.9,
RI (5) 58.3, HI (6) 67.5, MA (6) 64.5, ME (6) 51.5, MN (6) 50.8, NH (6) 50.2, KY (6) 34.3, VT (7) 65.2, DE (7) 56.0,

11-20: MI (7) 49.9, WI (7) 49.6, PA (7) 49.6, OH (7) 45.8, MD (8) 63.8, NY (8) 61.3, IL (8) 59.0, WA (8) 58.8, OR (8) 56.2, IA (8) 44.9,

21-25: WV (8) 27.9, CA (9) 66.1, NJ (10) 57.3, CT (10) 57.2, VA (10) 52.9,  

26-30: SD (10) 34.0, ND (10) 30.2, CO (11) 52.7, IN (11) 40.0, NE (11) 36.4,

31-40: NV (12) 51.3, 
UT (12) 37.7, AR (12) 35.8, WY (12) 24.3, NC (13) 48.1, MO (13) 39.9, KS (13) 38.8, TN (13) 36.4, AZ (14) 48.1, SC (14) 42.6,

41-51: AK (14) 41.6, LA (14) 39.8, MT (14) 38.9, AL (14) 35.6, NM (15) 54.7, ID (15) 31.7, FL (16) 49.4, MS (16) 40.8, OK (16) 30.7, GA (19) 47.4, TX (21) 45.2,  


C. OK, then how about this? Perhaps Vermont and Maine voted for Clinton because they were relatively safe states, with low rates of violent crime. Let's see, then, if a reasonable fear of violent crime was a factor in the election of Donald Trump. (Note: I consulted this list in the creation of the list below. It reflects the number of violent crimes per 100,000 population by state). 

VT (99) 65.2, ME (128) 51.5, WY (196) 24.3, NH (196) 50.2, VA (196) 52.9, KY (212) 34.3, ID (212) 31.7, UT (216) 37.7, RI (219) 58.3, MN (229) 50.8,

Avg. for the top ten 45.7%

OR (232) 56.2, CT (237) 57.2, HI (259) 67.5, NJ (261) 57.3, ND (265) 30.2, IA (274) 44.9, MS (279) 40.8, NE (280) 36.4, OH (285) 45.8, WA (285) 58.8,

Avg. for the second ten 49.5%

WI (290) 49.6, WV (302) 27.9, CO (309) 52.7, PA (314) 49.6, MT (324) 38.9,

Well. this started out looking pretty good. As anticipated, Vermont and Maine were right at the top. Ten of the fourteen safest states voted for Clinton. But then Clinton won only two of the next eleven. And the overall average for the safest states leans towards Trump.

SD (327) 34.0, NC (330) 48.1, KS (349) 38.8, IN (365) 40.0, IL (370) 59.0,

Avg. for the third ten 43.9%

GA (377) 47.4, NY (382) 61.3, MA (391) 64.5, CA (396) 66.1, AZ (400) 48.1, TX (406) 45.2, OK (406) 30.7, MI (427) 49.9, AL (427) 35.6, MO (443) 39.9, 

Avg. for the fourth ten 48.9%

MD (446) 63.8,
AR (480) 35.8, DE (489) 56.0, SC (498) 42.6, LA (515) 39.8, FL (541) 49.4, NM (597) 54.7, TN (608) 36.4, NV (636) 51.3, AK (636) 41.6, DC (1,244) 90.9

Avg. for the bottom eleven 56.2%

Make that two of the next fifteen... And three of the bottom five... And the fact the most dangerous states, on average, voted for Clinton. So, no, it doesn't appear that unemployment and poverty rates, or fear of violent crime were much of a factor in the election. And yet, there it is again. The states voting for Clinton towards the bottom of the list all had larger than average numbers of non-white voters.

D. Now, here's a list of the states by incarceration rates per 100,000 adults, based on this list. States with no death penalty have received a deduction of 100 from their total.

ME (350 - 100 = 250) 51.5, MN (380 - 100 = 280) 50.8, MA (400 - 100 = 300) 64.5, RI (400 - 100 = 300) 58.3, VT (410 - 100 = 310) 65.2, DC (450 - 100 = 350) 90.9 NH (460) 50.2, ND (470 - 100 = 370) 30.2, HI (510 - 100 = 410) 67.5, IA (530 - 100 = 430) 44.9,
Avg. for the top ten

NY (530 - 100 = 430) 61.3, NJ (540 - 100 = 440) 57.3, CT (620 - 100 = 520) 57.2, WA (550) 58.8, WV (660 - 100 = 560) 27.9, IL (700 - 100 = 600) 59.0, NE (600) 36.4, MD (710 - 100 = 610) 63.8, UT (620) 37.7, WI (780 - 100 = 680) 49.6,
 
Avg. for the second ten

MI (790 - 100 = 690) 49.9, NC (730) 48.1, OR (740) 56.2, CA (750) 66.1, MT (760) 38.9,

KS (760) 38.8, OH (780) 45.8, CO (790) 52.7,  SD (820) 34.0, AK (940 - 100 = 830) 41.6,
Avg. for the third ten


WY (840) 24.3, PA (850) 49.6, DE (960 - 100 = 860) 56.0, ID (860) 31.7, NM (980 - 100 = 880) 54.7, SC (880) 42.6, VA (910) 52.9, IN (910) 40.0, NV (930) 51.3, MO (950) 39.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

KY (950) 34.3, TN (960) 36.4, FL (990) 49.4, AR (1.010) 35.8, AZ (1.090) 48.1, TX (1.130) 45.2, GA (1.220) 47.4, AL (1,230) 35.6, MS (1,270) 40.8, OK (1,300) 30.7, LA (1,420) 39.8,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Note: 14 of the 20 states  (and DC) currently without a death penalty voted for Clinton.


E. So let's now look at homelessness, based upon the number of homeless per 100,000, according to this map.  

NOTE: when adding this in, add it in in reverse order for carnage scale, but regular order for lifestyle...

DC (1242, according to WaPo article) 90.9, HI (487) 67.5, NY (408) 61.3, NV (372) 51.3, MA (315) 64.5, OR (306) 56.2, CA (294) 66.1, WA (261) 58.8, VT (249) 65.2, AK (242) 41.6,
Avg. for the top ten

FL (209) 49.4, ME (205) 51.5, CO (187) 52.7, MT (170) 38.9, ND (170) 30.2, GA (164) 47.4, NE (161) 36.4, AZ (156) 48.1, MN (154) 50.8, TN (144) 36.4,
Avg. for the second ten %

NM (132) 54.7, MD (131) 63.8, NJ (131) 57.3, WY (130) 24.3, ID (129) 31.7,

CT (124) 57.2, MI (123) 49.9, MO (120) 39.9, PA (120) 49.6, NC (116) 48.1,    
Avg. for the third ten

KY (115) 34.3, RI (113) 58.3, WV (109) 27.9, OK (108) 30.7, TX (106) 45.2, WI (105) 49.6, UT (105) 37.7, SC (105) 42.6, SD (104) 34.0, NH (104) 50.2,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OH (102) 45.8, IL (102) 59.0, IA (100) 44.9. LA (99) 39.8, AR (99) 35.8, DE (96) 56.0, KS (96) 38.8, AL (94) 35.6, IN (91) 40.0, VA (84) 52.9, MS (74) 40.8,
Avg. for the final eleven


F. Let's look as well at the percentage of underwater mortgages per state, that is, the percentage of homeowners who owe more than the value of their home, and are in danger of losing their homes. This list was used as a guide.


DC (NA) 90.9,
AK (3.2) 41.6, WY (3.8) 24.3, VT (4.2) 65.2, ND (4.4) 30.2, MS (4.8) 40.8, SD (NA) 34.0, OR (5.0) 56.2, MN (5.1) 50.8, MT (5.1) 38.9, ID (5.3) 31.7,
Avg. for the top ten

MA (5.5) 64.5, HI (5.6) 67.5, WA (5.7) 58.8, TX (5.9) 45.2, CA (6.6) 66.1, VA (6.7) 52.9, NH (7.0) 50.2, NM (7.1) 54.7, CO (7.1) 52.7, UT (7.1) 37.7,
Avg. for the second ten

KY (7.7) 34.3, ME (8.3) 51.5, NE (8.3) 36.4, KS (8.5) 38.8, IA (8.9) 44.9, 

NY (9.2) 61.3, OK (9.2) 30.7, NC (9.3) 48.1, WV (9.5) 27.9, SC (9.8) 42.6,
Avg. for the third ten

WI (10.1) 49.6, TN (10.4) 36.4, RI (11.2) 58.3, PA (11.2) 49.6, AL (11.7) 35.6,  AZ (11.8) 48.1, AR (11.8) 35.8, CT (12.2) 57.2, GA (12.7) 47.4, IN (13.0) 40.0,
Avg. for the fourth ten

DE (13.1) 56.0, LA (13.2) 39.8, MD (13.9) 63.8, NJ (14.2) 57.3, MI (16.6) 49.9, FL (16.2) 49.4, MO (16.7) 39.9, OH (18.2) 45.8, IL (19.3) 59.0, NV (21.5) 51.3, 
Avg. for the bottom ten



Total for Rankings for A-F (Security)

NH (51) 50.2, VT (69) 65.2, ND (72) 30.2, MN (73) 50.8, SD (76) 34.0, IA (77) 44.9, UT (85) 37.7, VA (91) 52.9, NE (94) 36.4, ME (102) 51.5,
Avg. for the top ten

KS (111) 38.8, ID (112) 31.7, CO (119) 52.7, WI (128) 49.6, RI (132) 58.3, MA (134) 64.5, HI (136) 67.5, WY (140) 24.3, MT (146) 38.9, AR (148) 35.8,
Avg. for the second ten
TX (150) 45.2, NJ (154) 57.3, MD (155) 63.8, NY (161) 61.3, NC (161) 48.1,

CT (163) 57.2, OR (163) 56.2, IN (165) 40.0, MS (166) 40.8, KY (169) 34.3,
Avg. for the third ten

WA (170) 58.8, OH (171) 45.8, OK (180) 30.7, PA (181) 49.6, DE (182) 56.0, MO (183) 39.9, WV (185) 27.9, SC (186) 42.6, DC (159, 1 NA) 90.9, MI (193) 49.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten
,

CA (198) 66.1, IL (200) 59.0, 
GA (206) 47.4, AL (206) 35.6, LA (213) 39.8, NM (215) 54.7, 
TN (220) 36.4, AZ (226) 48.1, AK (229) 41.6, FL (244) 49.4, NV (278) 51.3, 
Avg. for the bottom ten


Well, this is almost convincing. Trump won 15 of the 20 least secure states. 

But why did so many states that have been doing so well vote for Trump, and why did some of the states with the most problems vote for Clinton?

Total of Rankings for Health, Prosperity, and Security

MN (5, 9, and 4 = 18) 50.8, NH (12, 8 and 1 = 21) 50.2, ND (16, 2, and 3 = 21) 30.2, NE (9, 4, and 9 = 22) 36.4, IA (15, 7, and 6 = 28) 44.9, SD (10, 13 and 5 = 28) 34.0, VA (20, 5 and 8 = 33) 52.9, MA (3, 15, and 16 = 34) 64.5, HI (4, 14, and 17 = 35) 67.5, CO (13, 10, and 13 = 36) 52.7,
Avg. for the top ten
 
VT (2, 35 and 2 = 39) 65.2, NJ (6, 11 and 22 = 39) 57.3, MD (17, 6, and 23 = 46) 63.8, CT (8, 19, and 26 = 53) 57.2, WI (18, 24, and 14 = 56) 49.6, UT (28, 23, and 7 = 58) 37.7, WY (37, 3, and 18 = 58) 24.3, TX (21, 18, and 21 = 60) 45.2, DC (1, 20 and 39, 4 NA = 60) 90.9, KS (39, 17, and 11 = 67) 38.8,
Avg. for the second ten

NY (11, 33, and 24 = 68) 61.3, WA (26, 12, and 31 = 69) 58.8, ME (14, 48 and 10 = 72) 51.5, AK (23, 1, and 49 = 73) 41.6, CA (7, 29, and 41 = 77) 66.1,

MT (33, 25, and 19 = 77) 38.9, RI (27, 37, and 15 = 79) 58.3, PA (24, 22, and 34 = 80) 49.6, ID (32, 40, and 12 = 84) 31.7, DE (34, 16, and 35 = 85) 56.0,
Avg. for the third ten

IL (25, 21, and 42 = 88) 59.0, NC (29, 38, and 25 = 92) 48.1, IN (45, 26, and 28 = 99) 40.0, OR (35, 42, and 27 = 104) 56.2, MI (36, 28, and 40 = 104) 49.9, OH (42, 30, and 32 = 104) 45.8, AZ (22, 34, and 48 = 104) 48.1, MO (43, 26, and 36 = 105) 39.9, FL (19, 39, and 50 = 108) 49.4, GA (30, 40, and 43 = 113) 47.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten
 
SC (31, 45, and 38 = 114) 42.6, OK (50, 31, and 33 = 114) 30.7, AR (47, 50, and 20 = 117) 35.8, MS (40, 49, and 29 = 118) 40.8, LA (41, 36, and 45 = 122) 39.8, TN (44, 32, and 47 = 123) 36.4, KY (48, 46, and 30 = 124) 34.3, NM (38, 47, and 46 = 131) 54.7, AL (46, 44, and 44 = 134) 35.6, WV (51, 51, and 37 = 139) 27.9, NV (49, 43, and 51 = 143) 51.3,
Avg. for the bottom eleven



Well, this is even better. 18 of the 31 healthiest and most successful states voted for Clinton, while 17 of the 20 least healthy and successful states voted for Trump. But this leaves some unanswered questions. Why did North Dakota vote for Trump in such numbers, and why did Nevada and New Mexico vote for Clinton?

And why was there so little correlation between the pct. of voters voting for Clinton per state and the state's position on the list?

This leads me to suspect, then, that the economy's role in the election was greatly exaggerated. This is supported, moreover, by exit polls, which showed that those claiming the economy was their main concern voted for Clinton, NOT Trump, by a margin of 52-41, and that Trump instead beat Clinton among those most concerned with terrorism 57-40, and immigration 64-33.
 

Finding #9:
"Identity Politics" was a factor in the election, but it was not THE factor.


THE ELECTION AS FILTERED THROUGH RACE AND IMMIGRANT STATUS

A. So now let's look at the elephant in the room: race. Let's look at the percentage of non-whites within the population of each state compared to how the state voted, Clinton against Trump. (Note: this chart was consulted in the creation of this list.) Clinton states are in bold.

HI (77.2) 67.5, DC (64.7) 90.9, CA (60.8) 66.1, NM (60.3) 54.7, TX (55.7) 45.2, NV (47.3) 51.3, MD (46.2) 63.8, GA (45.0) 47.4, FL (43.2) 49.4, AZ (43.1) 48.1,

Avg. for the top ten 58.4%

NY (42.6) 61.3, MS (42.5) 40.8, NJ (42.1) 57.3, LA (40.3) 39.8, IL (37.1) 59.0, AK (37.0) 41.6, VA (36.1) 52.9, SC (36.1) 42.6, DE (35.7) 56.0, NC (35.5) 48.1,

Avg. for the second ten 49.9%

AL (33.4) 35.6, OK (33.2) 30.7, CO (30.6) 52.7, CT (30.0) 57.2, WA (28.6) 58.8,

Well, there seems to be something to this. 14 of Clinton's 21 victories were in the 25 states with the lowest percentage of non-Hispanic whites.

AR (27.1) 35.8, TN (25.0) 36.4, MA (24.7) 64.5, RI (24.6) 58.3, KS (22.6) 38.8,

Avg. for the third ten 46.9%

OR (22.4) 56.2, PA (21.4) 49.6, MI (20.7) 49.9, UT (20.2) 37.7, MO (19.5) 39.9, OH (19.4) 45.8, IN (19.1) 40.0, NE (18.7) 36.4, MN (17.7) 50.8, WI (17.2) 49.6,

Avg. for the fourth ten 45.6%

ID (16.6) 31.7, SD (16.2) 34.0, WY (15.4) 24.3, KY (15.2) 34.3, MT (12.8) 38.9, IA (12.0) 44.9, ND (11.9) 30.2, NH (8.0) 50.2, WV (7.2) 27.9, VT (6.0) 65.2, ME (5.9) 51.5

Avg. for the bottom eleven 39.4%

Compare to


IRRESPONSIBLE SEX rankings for Teenage pregnancy, STD and HIV added together
race ranking from whitest to least white added at end for ease of comparison
NH (3) 50.2 (4), VT (6) 65.2 (2), ME (16) 51.5 (1), ID (23) 31.7 (11), UT (24) 37.7 (18), MN (32) 50.8 (13), IA (34) 44.9 (6), WI (36) 49.6 (12), ND (36) 30.2 (5), WY (39) 24.3 (9),

MT (41) 38.9 (7), MA (42) 64.5 (24), CT (42) 57.2 (28), NE (43) 36.4 (14), RI (45) 58.3 (23), OR (46) 56.2 (21), SD (50) 34.0 (10), KS (51) 38.8 (22), WV (53) 27.9 (3), WA (55) 58.8 (27),

CO (64) 52.7 (29),
NJ (70) 57.3 (38), PA (70) 49.6 (20), MI (71) 49.9 (19), KY (77) 34.3 (8),

IN (79) 40.0 (15), VA (81) 52.9 (35), MO (83) 39.9 (17), OH (88) 45.8 (16), AK (96) 41.6 (36),

HI (98) 67.5 (51),
AZ (99) 48.1 (42), MD (102) 63.8 (45), TN (103) 36.4 (25), CA (106) 66.1 (49), IL (106) 59.0 (37), FL (108) 49.4 (43), AL (108) 35.6 (31), DE (114) 56.0 (33), NM (114) 54.7 (48),
 

OK (117) 30.7 (30), NY (118) 61.3 (41), NV (119) 51.3 (46), AR (119) 35.8 (26), NC (120) 48.1 (32), SC (130) 42.6 (34), TX (132) 45.2 (47), GA (133) 47.4 (44), MS (142) 40.8 (40), LA (145) 39.8 (38), DC (153) 90.9 (50)

States with a lower ranking on the Irresponsible sex metric (or STD metric) than on the race metric--with whitest being at the top--are sleazy white

HI -20 NJ -16 CT -15 CA -14 UT -13 MA -12 MD -12  AZ -10  RI -8 VA -8

NM -8 CO -8 WA -7 MN -7 ID -7 FL -6 AK -6 OR -5 WI -4 KS -4

NV -3
NH -3
IL -1 VT - 0 TX -0

NE -0 DC +1
NY +1 IA +1 WY + 1

ME +2 
PA +3
GA +4 MT +4 ND + 4 MI +5 DE +6 LA +7 AL +7 SD +7

MS +9 TN +9 OK +10 IN +11 MO +11 SC +12 OH +13 NC +13 WV +16 KY +17 AR +18  

WOW the states that are plus 7 or more are all red!

Race vs STD ranking (so that states in which women marry in their teens aren't punished)

NJ (42.1) 57.3 (39-10) -29, HI (77.2) 67.5 (51-30) -21, MD (46.2) 63.8 (45-26) -19, CT (30.0) 57.2 (28-9) -19, MA (24.7) 64.5 (24-8) -16, FL (43.2) 49.4 (43-27) -16, NV (47.3) 51.3 (46-31) -15, UT (20.2) 37.7 (18-5) -13, CA (60.8) 66.1 (49-37) -12, WA (28.6) 58.8 (27-18) -9,

AZ (43.1) 48.1 (42-33) -9, KS (22.6) 38.8 (22-13) -9, RI (24.6) 58.3 (23-15) -8, TX (55.7) 45.2 (47-39) -8, VA (36.1) 52.9 (35-28) -7, OR (22.4) 56.2 (21-16) -5, CO (30.6) 52.7 (29-24) -5, ID (16.6) 31.7 (11-6) -5, NY (42.6) 61.3 (41-38) -3, NH (8.0) 50.2 (4-1) -3,

WY (15.4) 24.3 (9-7) -2, MN (17.7) 50.8 (13-12) -1, WV (7.2) 27.9 (3-2) -1, DC (64.7) 90.9 (50-51) +1, VT (6.0) 65.2 (2-3) +1,

GA (45.0) 47.4 (44-45) +1, DE (35.7) 56.0 (33-35) +2, NM (60.3) 54.7 (48-50) +2 , PA (21.4) 49.6 (20-22) +2, IL (37.1) 59.0 (37-40) +3,

ME (5.9) 51.5 (1-4) +3,
IA (12.0) 44.9 (6-11) +5, NE (18.7) 36.4 (14-20) +6, WI (17.2) 49.6 (12-19) +7, MS (42.5) 40.8 (40-47) +7, MT (12.8) 38.9 (7-14) +7, TN (25.0) 36.4 (25-32) +7,
MI (20.7) 49.9 (19-28) +9, KY (15.2) 34.3 (8-17) +9, IN (19.1) 40.0 (15-25) +10,

AL (33.4) 35.6 (31-41) +10, SC (36.1) 42.6 (34-46) +12, LA (40.3) 39.8 (38-50) +12, AK (37.0) 41.6 (36-49) +13, OK (33.2) 30.7 (30-43) +13, NC (35.5) 48.1 (32-48) +16, AR (27.1) 35.8 (26-42) +16, ND (11.9) 30.2 (5-21) +16, MO (19.5) 39.9 (17-34) +17, SD (16.2) 34.0 (10-29) +19, OH (19.4) 45.8 (16-36) +20,  


Well, this is how we could have figured, given Trump's many derogatory comments about ethnic and religious minorities. The states with the highest percentages of non-whites, for the most part, voted against him. Exit polling showed, for that matter, that non-white college graduates rejected Trump and voted for Clinton in higher numbers than white college graduates, 76-22 to 45-48, a drop-off of 31 points. And that this racial divide was significantly exacerbated among non-college graduates, 76-20 to 29-66, a drop-off of 47 points.

This was exacerbated, moreover, when one took into account the gender of the voter. Non-white men with no college degree 69-25 Clinton, non-white women 81-16. Non-white with college degree, 67-27 men, 77-18 women. White men with no college degree 23-71, white women with no college degree 34-61. White men with a college degree 39-53, white women with a college degree 51-44.

Education was the difference!

Even so, contained with the poll above is a bit of a surprise. Clinton won 3 of the 4 whitest states in America, and Trump won 4 of the 10 least white!

B. Well, then, let's look at its sister issue: immigration. This list reflecting the percentage of foreign-born residents per state was used to create this list.

CA (27.0) 66.1, NY (22.6) 61.3, NJ (21.7) 57.3, FL (20.0) 49.4, NV (19.3) 51.3, HI (17.0) 67.5, TX (16.7) 45.2, MA (15.6) 64.5, MD (14.8) 63.8, DC (14.1) 90.9, 
Avg. for the top ten

IL (13.7) 59.0, CT (13.7) 57.2, AZ (13.7) 48.1, WA (13.2) 58.8, RI (13.0) 58.3, VA (12.1) 52.9, NM (10.3) 54.7, CO (9.9) 52.7, OR (9.8) 56.2, GA (9.8) 47.4,  
Avg. for the second ten

UT (8.6) 37.7, DE (8.5) 56.0, MN (8.0) 50.8, NC (7.7) 48.1, AK (7.6) 41.6,

KS (7.0) 38.8, MI (6.5) 49.9, PA (6.4) 49.6, NE (6.4) 36.4, ID (6.3) 31.7, 
Avg. for the third ten

NH (5.9) 50.2, OK (5.7) 30.7, IA (5.0) 44.9, IN (4.9) 40.0, TN (4.9) 36.4, WI (4.8) 49.6, AR (4.8) 35.8, SC (4.7) 42.6, OH (4.1) 45.8, LA (4.0) 39.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

WY (4.0) 24.3, VT (3.9) 65.2, ME (3.7) 51.5, MO (3.7) 39.9, ND (3.7) 30.2, KY (3.6) 34.3, AL (3.2) 35.6, SD (2.7) 34.0, MT (2.3) 38.9, MS (2.1) 40.8, WV (1.4) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Well, that's a bit surprising. The states who had the least amount of immigrants voted for Trump, who built his campaign upon the fear of immigrants!

C. And now, let's look at the other sister: the percentage of each state's citizens speaking a foreign language in their home. This list was consulted in the creation of this list.

CA (43.9) 66.1, NM (36.8) 54.7, TX (35.5) 45.2, NV (30.7) 51.3, NJ (30.6) 57.3, NY (30.4) 61.3, FL (28.3) 49.4, AZ (27.0) 48.1, HI (25.2) 67.5, MA (22.6) 64.5, 
Avg. for the top ten

IL (22.6) 59.0, CT (21.8) 57.2, RI (21.0) 58.3, WA (18.8) 58.8, DC (17.8) 90.9, CO (17.2) 52.7, MD (17.1) 63.8, AK (16.6) 41.6, VA (15.6) 52.9, OR (15.5) 56.2,
Avg. for the second ten

UT (14.7) 37.7, GA (13.6) 47.4, DE (13.0) 56.0, KS (11.3) 38.8, NC (11.2) 48.1,

MN (11.1) 50.8, PA (10.8) 49.6, NE (10.6) 36.4, ID (10.3) 31.7, OK (10.0) 30.7,
Avg. for the third ten

MI (9.2) 49.9, WI (8.7) 49.6, LA (8.4) 39.8, IN (7.9) 40.0, NH (7.5) 50.2, IA (7.2) 44.9, TN (7.0) 36.4, AR (6.9) 35.8, ME (6.8) 51.5, SC (6.8) 42.6,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OH (6.6) 45.8, SD (5.7) 34.0, MO (5.6) 39.9, ND (5.5) 30.2, KY (5.2) 34.3, VT (5.0) 65.2, AL (4.9) 35.6, WY (4.0) 24.3, MT (3.9) 38.9, MS (3.7) 40.8, WV (2.0) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

D. By female population, according to this list. (Numbers reflect plus/minus women over men.)

DC (5.2) 90.9, DE (3.2) 56.0, RI (3.2) 58.3, AL (3.0) 35.6, MD (3.0) 63.8, MA (3.0) 64.5, NY (3.0) 61.3, MS (2.8) 40.8, NC (2.6) 48.1, SC (2.6) 42.6,
Avg. for the top ten

CT (2.4) 57.2, NJ (2.4) 57.3, TN (2.4) 36.4, FL (2.2) 49.4, GA (2.2) 47.4, LA (2.2) 39.8, OH (2.2) 45.8, PA (2.2) 49.6, ME (2.0) 51.5, MO (2.0) 39.9,
Avg. for the second ten

AR (1.8) 35.8, IL (1.8) 59.0, MI (1.8) 49.9, KY (1.6) 34.3, VA (1.6) 52.9,

IN (1.4) 40.0, VT (1.4) 65.2, NH (1.2) 50.2, WV (1.2) 27.9, OK (1.0) 30.7,
Avg. for the third ten

OR (1.0) 56.2, IA (0.8) 44.9, NM (0.8) 54.7, AZ (0.6) 48.1, CA (0.6) 66.1, MN (0.6) 50.8, TX (0.6) 45.2, WI (0.6) 49.6, KS (0.4) 38.8, NE (0.4) 36.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten

WA (0.0) 58.8,
ID (-0.2) 31.7, CO (-0.4) 52.7, MT (-0.4) 38.9, SD (-0.4) 34.0, UT (-0.6) 37.7, NV (-0.8) 51.3, HI (-1.0) 67.5, WY (-2.0) 24.3, ND (-2.2) 30.2, AK (-4.8) 41.6, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven

This divide was supported by exit polls as well. The National Exit Poll, in particular, found that married men voted for Trump over Clinton more than married women, 57-38 vs 47-49, and that this also held true for non-married men when compared to non-married women, 44-46 vs. 32-63. And yes, you read that right. If a married man was standing in an elevator with a non-married woman, the chances he voted for Trump and she voted for Clinton were almost three times greater than the chances she voted for Trump and he Clinton (.6 x .663 = .398 vs. .337 x .4 = .135) .398/.135 = 2.948

E. And here's a list by pct. of members identifying as LGBT.

DC (7.8) 90.9, HI (5.1) 67.5, OR (4.9) 56.2, VT (4.9) 65.2, ME (4.8) 51.5, RI (4.5) 58.3, MA (4.4) 64.5, SD (4.4) 34.0, NV (4.2) 51.3, CA (4.0) 66.1,
Avg. for the top ten

WA (4.0) 58.8, AZ (3.9) 48.1, KY (3.9) 34.3, NY (3.8) 61.3, IL (3.8) 59.0, MI (3.8) 49.9, NJ (3.7) 57.3, IN (3.7) 40.0, KS (3.7) 38.8, NH (3.7) 50.2,
Avg. for the second ten

TX (3.6) 45.2, OH (3.6) 45.8, FL (3.5) 49.4, GA (3.5) 47.4, AR (3.5) 35.8,

OK (3.4) 30.7, CT (3.4) 57.2, DE (3.4) 56.0, AK (3.4) 41.6, NC (3.3) 48.1,
Avg. for the third ten

MO (3.3) 39.9, MD (3.3) 63.8, CO (3.2) 52.7, LA (3.2) 39.8, WV (.3.1) 27.9, VA (2.9) 52.9, MN (2.9) 50.8, SC (2.9) 42.6, NM (2.9) 54.7, WY (2.9) 24.3,
Avg. for the fourth ten     

WI (2.8) 49.6, AL (2.8) 35.6, IA (2.8) 44.9, PA (2.7) 49.6, UT (2.7) 37.7, NE (2.7) 36.4,
ID (2.7) 31.7, TN (2.6) 36.4, MS (2.6) 40.8, MT (2.6) 38.9, ND (1.7) 30.2, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Total for A - C (Cultural Diversity by rankings total)

CA (6) 66.1,
NV (15) 51.3, TX (15) 45.2, HI (16) 67.5, NY (19) 61.3, FL (20) 49.4, NJ (21) 57.3, NM (23) 54.7, DC (27) 90.9, AZ (31) 48.1, 
Avg. for the top ten

MD (33) 63.8, IL (37) 59.0, MA (46) 64.5, CT (48) 57.2, GA (50) 47.4, VA (52) 52.9, WA (53) 58.8, RI (57) 58.3, CO (57) 52.7, AK (59) 41.6,   
Avg. for the second ten

DE (64) 56.0, NC (69) 48.1, OR (70) 56.2, UT (76) 37.7, KS (80) 38.8,

OK (84) 30.7, PA (87) 49.6, LA (87) 39.8, MN (88) 50.8, MI (91) 49.9,  
Avg. for the third ten

NE (95) 36.4, SC (96) 42.6, TN (99) 36.4, ID (100) 31.7, AR (101) 35.8, IN (105) 40.0, WI (108) 49.6, MS (112) 40.8, NH (114) 50.2, IA (115) 44.9,

Avg. for the fourth ten

AL (115) 35.6, OH (116) 45.8, MO (122) 39.9, SD (132) 34.0, WY (132) 24.3, ME (133) 51.5, KY (135) 34.3, ND (136) 30.2, VT (138) 65.2, MT (143) 38.9, WV (151) 27.9,


Total for A - C (Cultural Diversity by combined percentage)

Now let's add the percentages of non-hispanic whites, immigrants, and non-English speakers together to get a relative picture of diversity. (And yes, I realize that some people are counted three times.)

CA (131.7) 66.1, HI (119.4) 67.5, TX (107.9) 45.2, NM (107.4) 54.7, NV (97.3) 51.3, DC (96.7) 90.9, NY (95.6) 61.3, NJ (94.3) 57.3, FL (91.5) 49.4, AZ (83.8) 48.1, 
Avg. for the top ten 58.4%

IL (73.4) 59.0, GA (68.4) 47.4, MD (68.1) 63.8, CT (65.5) 57.2, VA (63.8) 52.9, MA (62.9) 64.5, AK (61.2) 41.6, WA (60.6) 58.8, RI (58.6) 58.3, CO (57.7) 52.7,  
Avg. for the second ten 49.9%

DE (57.2) 56.0, NC (54.4) 48.1, LA (52.7) 39.8, OK (48.9) 30.7, MS (48.3) 40.8,  

OR (47.7) 56.2,
SC (47.6) 42.6, UT (43.5) 37.7, AL (41.5) 35.6, KS (40.9) 38.8, 
Avg. for the third ten 46.9%

AR (38.8) 35.8, PA (38.6) 49.6, TN (36.9) 36.4, MN (36.8) 50.8, MI (36.4) 49.9, NE (35.7) 36.4, ID (33.2) 31.7, IN (31.9) 40.0, WI (30.7) 49.6, OH (30.1) 45.8, 

Avg. for the fourth ten 45.6%

MO (28.8) 39.9, SD (24.6) 34.0, KY (24.0) 34.3, IA (24.2) 44.9, WY (23.4) 24.3, NH (21.4) 50.2, ND (21.1) 30.2, MT (19.0) 38.9, ME (16.4) 51.5, VT (14.9) 65.2, WV (10.6) 27.9,

Now, let's add in the pct. female advantage times three, along with the LGBT pct times three. This should give us a number reflecting the cultural diversity of each state, that is, the degree to which the state is not dominated by straight white males.

Total Cultural Diversity A-E (with D and E modified)

CA (145.5) 66.1, DC (135.7) 90.9, HI (131.7) 67.5, TX (120.5) 45.2, NM (118.5) 54.7, NY (116.0) 61.3, NJ (112.6) 57.3, FL (108.6) 49.4, NV (107.5) 51.3, AZ (97.3) 48.1, 
Avg. for the top ten

IL (90.6) 59.0, MD (87.0) 63.8, GA (85.5) 47.4, MA (85.1) 64.5, CT (82.9) 57.2, RI (81.7) 58.3, VA (77.3) 52.9, DE (77.0) 56.0, WA (72.6) 58.8, NC (72.1) 48.1, 
Avg. for the second ten

LA (68.9) 39.8, CO (66.1) 52.7, OR (65.4) 56.2, MS (64.5) 40.8, SC (64.1) 42.6,

OK (62.1) 30.7, AL (58.9) 35.6, AK (57.0) 41.6, AR (54.7) 35.8, PA (53.3) 49.6,  
Avg. for the third ten

MI (53.2) 49.9, KS (53.2) 38.8, TN (51.9) 36.4, UT (49.8) 37.7, OH (47.5) 45.8, MN (47.3) 50.8, IN (47.2) 40.0, NE (45.0) 36.4, MO (44.7) 39.9, WI (40.9) 49.6, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

ID (40.7) 31.7, KY (40.5) 34.3, ME (36.8) 51.5, SD (36.6) 34.0, NH (36.1) 50.2, VT (34.8) 65.2, IA (35.0) 44.9, MT (25.6) 38.9, WY (26.1) 24.3, WV (23.5) 27.9, ND (19.6) 30.2,

Well, that's pretty convincing. But, what's up with New England? And Minnesota? Why did they vote for Clinton when they are demographically closer to Trump country--Wyoming, South Dakota and Montana.

Total Rankings of Health, Prosperity, and Security (combined) plus Final Rankings Cultural Diversity (Identity Politics)

Now, let's add the rankings of the final tally with the rankings of our previous list representing "American Carnage", with the worst carnage toward the bottom.

HI (9 + 3 = 12) 67.5, NJ (12 + 7 = 19) 57.3, DC (19 + 2 = 21) 90.9, MA (8 + 14 = 22) 64.5, TX (18 + 4 = 22) 45.2, VA (7 + 17 = 24) 52.9, MD (13 + 12 = 25) 63.8, CA (26 + 1 = 27) 66.1, CT (14 + 15 = 29) 57.2, NY (24 + 6 = 30) 61.3,
Avg. for the top ten

CO (10 + 22 = 32) 52.7, MN (1 + 36 = 37) 50.8, WA (21 + 19 = 40) 58.8, IL (31 + 11 = 42) 59.0, NE (4 + 38 = 42) 36.4, RI (27 + 16 = 43) 58.3, DE (29 + 18 = 47) 56.0, NH (2 + 45 = 47) 50.2, FL (39 + 8 = 47) 49.4, AZ (37 + 10 = 47) 48.1

SD (5 + 44 = 49) 34.0, UT (16 + 34 = 50) 37.7, NM (47 + 5 = 52) 54.7, NC (32 + 20 = 52) 48.1, IA (5 + 47 = 52) 44.9, 

AK (24 + 28 = 52) 41.6, KS (20 + 32 = 52) 38.8, GA (40 + 13 = 53) 47.4, ND (3 + 51 = 54) 30.2, WI (15 + 40 = 55) 49.6,
Avg. for the third ten

VT (11 + 46 = 57) 65.2, OR (35 + 23 = 58) 56.2, PA (28 + 30 = 58) 49.6, NV (51 + 9 = 60) 51.3, ME (22 + 43 = 65) 51.5, MI (34 + 31 = 65) 49.9, MS (42 + 24 = 66) 40.8, LA (45 + 21 = 66) 39.8, WY (17 + 49 = 66) 24.3, OK (41 + 26 = 67) 30.7,
Avg. for the fourth ten

SC (44 + 25 = 69) 42.6, IN (33 + 37 = 70) 40.0, OH (36 + 35 = 71) 45.8, ID (30 + 41 = 71) 31.7,  AR (43 + 29 = 72) 35.8, MT (25 + 48 = 73) 38.9, MO (38 + 39 = 77) 39.9, AL (49 + 29 = 78) 35.6,  TN (49 + 33 = 82) 36.4, KY (47 + 42 = 89) 34.3, WV (50 + 50 = 100) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Well, this is pretty good. But there's a serious problem. Why the heck did Maine, the whitest state in the country, and a state with its share of economy woes, vote for Clinton? And what's up with Nevada and Oregon? And what about Texas? Why didn't it vote for Clinton?

Well, this is interesting. It seems that any metric designed to include race and "carnage" has a problem with Maine, Nevada and Oregon. If you give enough weight to race to bring Nevada into the fold, you force Maine into the far reaches of Trump country. And the reverse is true if you try to bring Maine back into the fold by adding metrics related to the economy.

And that's not even to mention the problems on the opposite side. How is Nebraska more a Clinton state than Vermont? And just look at Vermont. It's on the list directly above North Dakota. Both are healthy and successful states overall--in the top ten. And both are very very white--among the 6 whitest states. And yet Trump received twice the percentage of the vote in North Dakota as he did in Vermont. There has got to be a reason for this. That has little or nothing to do with the economy or identity politics...


Finding #10: The nastiness of the election and the divisions it has exposed reflects an underlying culture war that has been building since the 1960's...


An Attempt At Answering the Maine Question, Or...The Election As A Lifestyle Choice
The thought occurs that, in opposition to the numerous articles and commentaries blaming Trump's victory on Clinton and her failure to connect with voters in the "rust-belt" (which is a chicken-shit way of saying she refused to lie to them and tell them she was gonna bring their jobs back and "Make America Great Again", a la Trump), the election was actually a referendum on recent changes in the American landscape, i.e. multi-culturalism, marriage equality, and a freakin' black President, and that "Change" lost to "Obstruct, and if possible, go backwards." This thought is supported by my discovery of this map of the United States, in which the most discussed sport (outside of the four major sports) for each state in comparison to the national average for this sport, were presented. It broke down as follows, in order of the average of how the states supporting each sport voted for Clinton vs. Trump.

Tennis. Avg. 69.2
DC 90.9, GA 47.4

Surfing Avg. 58.6
HI 67.5, FL 49.4

Lacrosse Avg. 57.6
MD 63.8, NY 61.3, NJ 57.3, DE 56.0, PA 49.6

Soccer Avg. 55.8
CA 66.1, WA 58.8, VA 52.9, TX 45.2

Skiing Avg. 51.3
VT 65.2, MA 64.5, RI 58.3, CT 57.2, OR 56.2, CO 52.7, ME 51.5, NH 50.2, MT 38.9, UT 37.7, ID 31.7

Boxing Avg. 51.3
NV 51.3

Bowling Avg. 49.9
MI 49.9

Golf Avg. 45.4
NC 48.1, SC 42.6,

Volleyball Avg. 44.4
IL 59.0, NM 54.7, MN 50.8, WI 49.6, AZ 48.1, IA 44.9, AK 41.6, KS 38.8, NE 36.4, SD 34.0, ND 30.2

Softball Avg. 37.6
OH 45.8, MS 40.8, IN 40.0, MO 39.9, LA 39.8, TN 36.4, AR 35.8, AL 35.6, KY 34.3, WV 27.9,
  
Rodeo Avg. 27.5
OK 30.7, WY 24.3

I mean, just from looking at this, you can tell that a state's having a deep interest in softball and/or rodeo is a much better indicator of how it voted than a state's having a problem with unemployment and/or violent crime.

I later looked at a similar map reporting on the favorite ice cream flavors (beyond the universally-loved Vanilla and Chocolate) per state, and found it also had a rough correlation with the election.

Mint Chocolate Avg. 54.9
NJ 57.3, DE 56.0, ME 51.5,

Coffee Avg. 53.2
HI 67.5, CA 66.1, VT 65.2, MA 64.5, WA 58.8, RI 58.3, CT 57.2, OR 56.2, VA 52.9, CO 52.7, MN 50.8, NH 50.2, WI 49.6, AZ 48.1, NC 48.1, MT 38.9, TN 36.4, AR 35.8,

Cookie Dough 44.6
MD 63.8, NY 61.3, IL 59.0, NM 54.7, MI 49.9, OH 45.8, IA 44.9, SC 42.6, IN 40.0, MO 39.9, KS 38.8, NE 36.4, SD 34.0, ND 30.2, WV 27.9,

Strawberry Avg. 43.2
FL 49.4, GA 47.4, AK 41.6, KY 34.3,

Brownie Avg. 38.7
NV 51.3, PA 49.6, TX 45.2, MS 40.8, LA 39.8, UT 37.7, AL 35.6, ID 31.7, OK 30.7, WY 24.3

I later found an article regarding Google searches for plastic surgery procedures. According to this article, these were the most requested procedures by state:

Laser Hair Removal: Avg 54.2
MA 64.5, RI 58.3, NJ 57.3, OR 56.2, VA 52.9, CO 52.7, NH 50.2, WI 49.6, OH 45.8,

Lip Injection: Avg. 51.4
NM 54.7, NV 51.3, AZ 48.1,

Eyelid Surgery: Avg 47.3
CT 57.2, MN 50.8, SD 34.0,

Liposuction: 46.8
MD 63.8, NY 61.3, IL 59.0, DE 56.0, PA 49.6, FL 49.4, NC 48.1, GA 47.4, TX 45.2, SC 42.6, MS 40.8, LA 39.8, TN 36.4, AL 35.6, WV 27.9,

Breast implants: Avg 44.9
CA 66.1, VT 65.2, WA 58.8, ME 51.5, MT 38.9, KS 38.8, UT 37.7, AR 35.8, ID 31.7, WY 24.3

Penis Enlargement: Avg 42.8
HI 67.5, MI 49.9, IA 44.9, AK 41.6, IN 40.0, MO 39.9, NE 36.4, KY 34.3, OK 30.7,

Vaginal Rejuvenation: Avg 30.2
ND 30.2

This led me, then, to look at other factors, such as drug of choice. I consulted this list of states and compiled this list, and sure, enough, there was a divide between the Trump states and Clinton states.

Heroin 
DC 90.9, MA 64.5, MD 63.8, NY 61.3, IL 59.0, RI 58.3, NJ 57.3, CT 57.2, PA 49.6

Opiates

VT 65.2, DE 56.0, ME 51.5, NH 50.2, TN 36.4, KY 34.3, WV 27.9,

Stimulants/methamphetamine
CA 66.1,
NM 54.7, NV 51.3, AZ 48.1, UT 37.7, NE 36.4,

Cocaine
GA 47.4

Marijuana
HI 67.5, WA 58.8, OR 56.2, VA 52.9, CO 52.7, MN 50.8, MI 49.9, WI 49.6, FL 49.4, NC 48.1, OH 45.8, TX 45.2, IA 44.9, SC 42.6, AK 41.6, MS 40.8, IN 40.0, MO 39.9, LA 39.8, MT 38.9, KS 38.8, AR 35.8, AL 35.6, SD 34.0, ID 31.7, OK 30.7, ND 30.2, WY 24.3

Hmmm, 8 out of 9 heroin states voted for Clinton. And 22 of the 28 marijuana states voted for Trump. This probably means little, however, as VT and WV  both have a problem with opiates, CA and NE both have a problem with stimulants and HI and WY both have a problem with Mary Jane.

A. This last bit led me to look for more information regarding the comparative use of marijuana among the states. I found this list regarding the adolescent use of marijuana. Here's the estimated percentage of adolescents using marijuana on a monthly basis by state:

CO (12.56) 52.7, VT (11.40) 65.2, RI (10.69) 58.3, DC (10.56) 90.9, OR (10.19) 56.2,
WA (10.06) 58.8, ME (9.90) 51.5, NH (9.83) 50.2, AK (9.19) 41.6, MA (8.88) 64.5,
Avg. for the top ten 

CA (8.74) 66.1, AZ (8.30) 48.1, MT (8.30) 38.9, DE (8.22) 56.0, MI (8.09) 49.9, MD (8.05) 63.8, NM (7.98) 54.7, NV (7.97) 51.3, CT (7.91) 57.2, NY (7.75) 61.3,
Avg. for the second ten

HI (7.65) 67.5,
FL (7.51) 49.4, WI (7.18) 49.6, PA (7.00) 49.6, IL (6.75) 59.0,

MN (6.75) 50.8,
IN (6.52) 40.0, NC (6.51) 48.1, MO (6.45) 39.9, ID (6.39) 31.7,  
Avg. for the third ten

NJ (6.36) 57.3, AR (6.22) 35.8, WY (6.19) 24.3, SC (6.16) 42.6, TX (6.12) 45.2, GA (6.06) 47.4, OH (6.04) 45.8, VA (5.89) 52.9, KS (5.85) 38.8, TN (5.70) 36.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten 

KY (5.63) 34.3, MS (5.60) 40.8, ND (5.60) 30.2,  WV (5.60) 27.9, LA (5.55) 39.8, NE (5.54) 36.4,  OK (5.52) 30.7, UT (5.42) 37.7, SD (5.32) 34.0, IA (5.17) 44.9, AL (4.98) 35.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Well, that's a good one. The 8 states, and 17 of the 21 states ,with the most pot smoking kids voted for Clinton, and the 13 states, and 19 of the 20 states, with the least pot smoking kids voted for Trump. Are Trump supporters goody-goods?


B. No. I suppose not. I subsequently came across a map which was even more illustrative of the Trump/Clinton divide. It divided the states into four categories representing the amount of painkiller prescriptions per 100 people. (I later came across this list providing more specific numbers for the states.)

52-71 prescriptions per 100 people (yellow on map)
HI (52.0) 67.5, CA (57.0) 66.1, NY (59.5) 61.3, MN (61.6) 50.8, NJ (62.9) 57.3, AK (65.1) 41.6, SD (66.5) 34.0, VT (67.4) 65.2, IL (67.9) 59.0, WY (69.6) 24.3, MA (70.8) 64.5, CO (71.2) 52.7, 

72-82.1 prescriptions per 100 people (orange on map)
NH (71.7) 50.2, CT (72.4) 57.2, FL (72.7) 49.4, IA (72.8) 44.9, NM (73.8) 54.7, MD (74.3) 63.8, TX (74.3) 45.2, ND (74.7) 30.2, WI (76.1) 49.6, WA (77.3) 58.8, VA (77.5) 52.9, NE (79.4) 36.4  MT (82.0) 38.9,

82.2-95 prescriptions per 100 people (lavender on map)
AZ (82.4) 48.1, ME (85.1) 51.5, ID (85.6) 31.7, DC (85.7) 90.9, UT (85.8) 37.7, PA (88.2) 49.6, OR (89.2) 56.2, RI (89.6) 58.3, DE (90.2) 56.0, GA (90.7) 47.4, KS (93.8) 38.8, NV (94.1) 51.3, MO (94.8) 39.9,

96-143 prescriptions per 100 people (purple on map)
NC (96.6) 48.1, OH (100.1) 45.8, SC (101.8) 42.6, MI (107.0) 49.9, IN (109.1) 40.0, AR (115.8) 35.8, LA (118.0) 39.8, MS (120.3) 40.8, OK (127.8) 30.7, KY (128.4) 34.3, WV (137.6) 27.9, TN (142) 36.4, AL (142.9) 35.6,

Now, that's pretty striking. The 14 pill-poppingest states voted for Trump.

Age-adjusted OD rate
NE (6.9) 36.4, SD (8.4) 34.0, ND (8.6) 30.2,
TX (9.4) 45.2, IA (10.3) 44.9, MN (10.6) 50.8, HI (11.3) 67.5, CA (11.3) 66.1, KS (11.8) 38.8, OR (12.0) 56.2,

MS (12.3) 40.8,
VA (12.4) 52.9, GA (12.7) 47.4, NY (13.6) 61.3, MT (13.8) 38.9, AR (13.8) 35.8, IL (14.1) 59.0, ID (14.2) 31.7, WA (14.7) 58.8, CO (15.4) 52.7,

WI (15.5) 49.6, AL (15.7) 35.6, NC (15.8) 48.1, SC (15.8) 42.6, AK (16.0) 41.6,

FL (16.2) 49.4, NJ (16.3) 57.3, WY (16.4) 24.3, VT (16.7) 65.2, MO (17.9) 39.9,

DC (18.6) 90.9,
AZ (19.0) 48.1, LA (19.0) 39.8, OK (19.0) 30.7, IN (19.5) 40.0, NV (20.4) 51.3, MI (20.4) 49.9, MD (20.9) 63.8, ME (21.2) 51.5, DE (22.0) 56.0,

CT (22.1) 57.2,
TN (22.2) 36.4,
UT (23.4) 37.7,
NM (25.3) 54.7, MA (25.7) 64.5, PA (26.3) 49.6, RI (28.2) 58.3, OH (29.9) 45.8, KY (29.9) 34.3, NH (34.3) 50.2, WV (41.5) 27.9,


C. I later came across a list of states ranked by the sales of pick-up trucks, and matched that up with the election results. This was also more suggestive of Trump voters vs. Clinton voters than any economic factor. Here it is from bottom to top, accompanied by the percentage of head to head votes for Clinton vs. Trump.

DC 90.9, NJ 57.3, HI 67.5, CA 66.1, CT 57.2, RI 58.3, NY 61.3, FL 49.4, MD 63.8, MA 64.5,
Avg. for the top ten 63.6%

IL 59.0, VA 52.9, DE 56.0, NV 51.3, WA 58.8, OH 45.8, PA 49.6, NC 48.1, AZ 48.1, GA 47.4,
Avg. for the second ten 51.7%
 
OR 56.2, SC 42.6, NH 50.2, TN 36.4, CO 52.7,

IN 40.0, KY 34.3, MI 49.9, WI 49.6, AL 35.6,
Avg. for the third ten 44.8%

UT 37.7, MO 39.9, VT 65.2, MN 50.8, ME 51.5, NM 54.7, WV 27.9, KS 38.8, MS 40.8, TX 45.2,
Avg. for the fourth ten 45.3%

NE 36.4, IA 44.9, LA 39.8, AR 35.8, ID 31.7, OK 30.7, AK 41.6, SD 34.0, MT 38.9, ND 30.2, WY 24.3
Avg. for bottom eleven 35.3%

Well, that's a heckuva coincidence! The smallest percentage of pick-up trucks was in D.C., which had the highest percentage of voters for Clinton. And the largest percentage was in Wyoming, which had the lowest percentage of voters for Clinton. And this wasn't some freak occurrence. Clinton won 14 of the 15 states with the smallest percentage of pick-up trucks, and lost the fifteen states with the largest percentage.

D.
So let's continue to test the election results against the lifestyle of the voters. As most of the Trump supporters I've met have expressed fear Hillary and friends will try to take away their guns, I decided to see if there's a connection between gun ownership and voting for Trump. In the list below, the percentage of households owning a gun for each state are presented, from lowest percentage to highest, along with the percentage of votes for Clinton against Trump in that state. (Note: this map was consulted. I later compared it to this map, and found that they had widely divergent numbers on a number of states. I thereby decided to add the numbers from the two maps together to effectively form an average.)

RI (12.8 + 5.8 = 18.6) 58.3, NJ (12.3 + 11.3 = 24) 57.3, NY (18.0 + 10.3 = 28.3) 61.3, DC (3.6 + 25.9 = 29.5) 90.9, DE (25.5 + 5.2 = 30.7) 56.0, CT (16.7 + 16.6 = 33.3) 57.2, MA (12.6 + 22.6 = 35.2) 64.5, MD (21.3 +20.7 = 42.0) 63.8, CA (21.3 + 20.1 = 41.4) 66.1, NH (30.0 + 14.4 = 44.4) 50.2,
Avg. for the top ten 62.5%

IL (20.2 + 26.2 = 46.4) 59.0, HI (6.7 + 45.1 = 51.8) 67.5, OH (32.4 + 19.6 = 52.0) 45.8, FL (24.5 + 32.5 = 57.0) 49.4, NE (38.6 + 19.8 = 58.4) 36.4, WA (33.1 + 27.7 = 60.8) 58.8, PA (34.7 + 27.1 = 61.8) 49.6, ME (40.5 + 22.6 = 63.1) 51.5, AZ (31.1 + 32.3 = 63.4) 48.1, VA (35.1 + 29.3 = 64.4) 52.9,
Avg. for the second ten 51.9%

OR (39.8 + 26.6 = 66.4) 56.2,
MI (38.4 + 28.8 = 67.2) 49.9, MO (41.7 + 27.1 = 68.2) 39.9, CO (34.7 + 34.3 = 69.0) 52.7, NC (41.3 + 28.7 = 69.0) 48.1,

Now this is quite convincing. The twelve states with the lowest percentage of gun owners all voted for Clinton.

VT (42.0 + 28.8 = 70.8) 65.2, NV (33.8 + 37.5 = 71.3) 51.3, TX (35.9 + 35.7 = 71.6) 45.2, GA (40.3 + 31.6 = 71.9) 47.4, IN (39.1 + 33.8 = 72.9) 40.0,
Avg. for the third ten 49.6%

OK (42.9 + 31.2 = 74.1) 30.7, KS (42.1 + 32.2 = 74.3) 38.8, UT (43.9 + 31.9 = 75.8) 37.7, IA (42.9 + 33.8 = 76.7) 44.9, MN (41.7 + 36.7 = 78.4) 50.8, WI (44.4 + 34.7 = 79.1) 49.6, TN (43.9 + 39.4 = 83.3) 36.4, NM (34.8 + 49.9 = 84.7) 54.7, SC (42.3 + 44.4 = 86.7) 42.6, LA (44.1 + 44.5 = 88.6) 39.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten 42.6%
 
KY (47.7 + 42.4 = 90.1) 34.3, SD (56.6 + 35.0 - 91.6) 34.0, MS (55.3 + 42.8 = 98.1) 40.8, ND (50.7 + 47.9 = 98.6) 30.2, AL (51.7 + 48.9 = 100.6) 35.6, WV (55.4 + 54.2 = 109.6) 27.9, MT (57.7 + 52.3 = 110.0) 38.9, AR (55.3 + 57.9 = 111.2) 35.8, ID (55.3 + 56.9 = 112.2) 31.7, WY (59.7 + 54.2 = 113.9) 24.3, AK (57.8 + 61.7 = 119.5) 41.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven 34.1%

And twenty-two of the twenty-four states with the highest level of gun ownership voted for Trump. If that's not a smoking... well, you know. In any event, it seems clear gun ownership (and perhaps the thought of a woman taking away a man's gun?) was a factor in the election.

E. Having established that a Trump voter loves his guns, I decided to check to see if he loved his dog as well. I found a map in which dog ownership rates were subtracted from cat ownership rates. While I couldn't find the precise statistics behind the map, and the map excluded AK and HI (for whom I made an estimate based on a number of sources), I decided that it could be used to make my point. The top of the list, then, reflects the states in which there are more cats than dogs, and then works its way down.

12-9% cats over dogs
MA 64.5, VT 65.2, ME 51.5,

9-6% cats over dogs
CT 57.2, NH 50.2,

3-0% cats over dogs
NY 61.3, WA 58.8, OR 56.2, PA 49.6,

0-3% dogs over cats
DC 90.9, MD 63.8, RI 58.3, DE 56.0, MN 50.8, WI 49.6, NE 36.4,

3-6% dogs over cats
HI 67.5, CA 66.1, MI 49.9, OH 45.8, IA 44.9, IN 40.0, UT 37.7, SD 34.0, ND 30.2, WY 24.3,

6-9% dogs over cats
IL 59.0, VA 52.9, NV 51.3, FL 49.4, AK 41.6, MT 38.9, ID 31.7, WV 27.9,

9-12% dogs over cats
NJ 57.3, CO 52.7, AZ 48.1, NC 48.1, SC 42.6, LA 39.8, KS 38.8, KY 34.3, OK 30.7,

12-15% dogs over cats
NM 54.7,
GA 47.4, MO 39.9, TN 36.4,

15-18% dogs over cats
TX 45.2, MS 40.8, AR 35.8, AL 35.6,   

Well, here it is again. Thirteen of the sixteen most cat-loving states and districts voted for Clinton, and twenty-seven of the thirty-five most dog loving states voted for Trump.

F. When trying to think of another factor other than gun ownership and dog ownership by which to distinguish the blue states from red states, I kept going back to alcohol consumption. But every chart I looked at sent a mixed message, with blue states intermingled with red states. When I looked at binge-drinking, for example, I found that the percentage of state occupants engaging in binge-drinking could be multiplied by the number of drinks consumed by the average binge-drinker per binge in each state, to derive an average amount of binge drinks per capita. This failed to illustrate what I suspected it would, however. While fourteen of the fifteen states having the most binge-drinks per capita voted for Trump, so did the six states with least binge-drinks per capita. I almost gave up. Eventually however, I discovered that there was a measure relating to alcohol that was indicative of the cultural divide I was seeking to identify, and quantify. And that was the ratio of beer consumption to wine consumption per state. (This list and this list were used to create this list.)

DC (1.07) 90.9, CT (1.61) 57.2, NJ (1.62) 57.3, MA (1.64) 64.5, VT (1.79) 65.2, CA (1.86) 66.1, NY (1.93) 61.3, RI (2.00) 58.3, WA (2.13) 58.8, NH (2.21) 50.2,
Avg. for the top ten 63.0%

HI (2.50) 67.5,
OR (2.51) 56.2, DE (2.62) 56.0, FL (2.73) 49.4, VA (2.74) 52.9, MD (2.93) 63.8, AK (2.97) 41.6, NV (2.99) 51.3, ME (3.00) 51.5, IL (3.07) 59.0,
Avg. for the second ten 54.9%

MN (3.73) 50.8, AZ (3.75) 48.1, ID (3.80) 31.7, CO (3.84) 52.7, MI (3.86) 49.9,

WI (4.20) 49.6, NC (4.58) 48.1, IN (4.64) 40.0, MO (4.64) 39.9, OH (4.65) 45.8,
Avg. for the third ten 45.7%

MT (4.88) 38.9, GA (5.00) 47.4, AL (5.10) 35.6, PA (5.29) 49.6, NM (5.48) 54.7, TN (5.59) 36.4, OK (6.00) 30.7, SC (6.07) 42.6, UT (6.09) 37.7, LA (6.51) 39.8,  
Avg. for the fourth ten 41.3%

AR (6.57) 35.8, WY (7.00) 24.3, IA (7.32) 44.9, NE (7.32) 36.4, TX (7.48) 45.2, SD (7.80) 34.0, ND (8.18) 30.2, KS (9.38) 38.8, KY (9.43) 34.3, MS (12.54) 40.8, WV (13.04) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven 35.7%

So, what can I say? If you live in a red state and you want to turn it blue, you need to drink more wine. Lots of it...

Binge-drinking

TN (10.9 x 7.0 = 76.3) 36.4, UT (11.4 x 7.3 = 83.2) 37.7, AL (12.2 x 7.3 = 89.1) 35.6, WV (11.8 x 7.9 = 93.2) 27.9, NC (14.6 x 6.4 = 93.4) 48.1,
MS (12.5 x 7.6 = 95.0) 40.8,
MD (14.7 x 6.6 = 97.0) 63.8, NM (13.6 x 7.2 = 97.9) 54.7, OK (13.6 x 7.5 = 102.0) 30.7, WA (16.6 x 6.2 = 102.9) 58.8,

NV (14.5 x 7.2 = 104.0) 51.3,
AZ (15.0 x 7.1 = 106.5) 48.1,
CA (16.7 x 6.5 = 108.5) 66.1, GA (15.8 x 6.9 = 109.0) 47.4, ID (14.8 x 7.4 = 109.5) 31.7, DE (15.8 x 7.0 = 110.6) 56.0, OR (17.7 x 6.3 = 111.5) 56.2, NH (17.8 x 6.4 = 113.9) 50.2, KS (16.5 x 7.0 = 115.5) 38.8, TX (16.1 x 7.2 = 115.9) 45.2,
 

FL (17.2 x 6.8 = 117.0) 49.4, NJ (17.0 x 6.9 = 117.3) 57.3, WY (16.9 x 7.0 = 118.3) 24.3, RI (17.0 x 7 = 119.0) 58.3, CO (18.1 x 6.6 = 119.5) 52.7,

IN (16.6 x 7.2 = 119.5) 40.0,
NY (17.6 x 6.8 = 119.7) 61.3, SC (16.3 x 7.4 = 120.6) 42.6, VA (17.0 x 7.1 = 120.7) 52.9, MA (18.7 x 6.5 = 121.6) 64.5,

KY (16.1 x 7.8 = 125.6) 34.3,
AR (15.2 x 8.3 = 126.2) 35.8, CT (18.3 x 7 = 128.1) 57.2, VT (19.0 x 6.8 = 129.2) 65.2, PA (18.5 x 7.0 = 129.5) 49.6, SD (17.9 x 7.6 = 136.0) 34.0, LA (18.0 x 7.6 = 136.8) 39.8, MO (17.7 x 7.8 = 138.1) 39.9, MI (19.8 x 7.3 = 144.5) 49.9, NE (20.4 x 7.2 = 146.9) 36.4,

MN (20.5 X 7.2 = 147.6) 50.8,
IL (20.8 x 7.1 = 147.7) 59.0, ME (20.2 x 7.4 = 149.5) 51.5, OH (19.5 x 7.7 = 150.2) 45.8, HI (19.8 x 7.6 = 150.5) 67.5, DC (24.4 x 6.2 = 151.3) 90.9, MT (21.3 x 7.2 = 153.4) 38.9, AK (20 x 7.8 = 156.0) 41.6, IA (21.3 x 7.6 = 161.9) 44.9, WI (24.4 x 7.2 = 175.7) 49.6, ND (24.9 x 7.7 = 191.7) 30.2



So, what can I say? If you live in a red state and you want to turn it blue, you need to drink more wine. Lots of it...

Alcohol culture (ranking for bars per capita plus ranking for liquor stores per capita, from least alcohol-oriented to most) according to this map


VA (51,45 = 96) 52.9,  NC (42,48 = 90) 48.1, MS (49,40 = 89) 40.8, CA (38.49 = 87) 66.1, TN (46,38 = 84) 36.4, GA (49,33 = 82) 47.4, NM (45,36 = 81) 54.7, AZ (36,44 = 80) 48.1,MD (32,42 = 74) 63.8, MA (27,46 = 73) 64.5,

NJ (29,43 =72) 57.3,
SC (39,32 = 71) 42.6, MO (30,41 = 71) 39.9, AR (47,22 = 69) 35.8, FL (34,35 = 69) 49.4, NY (19,50 = 69) 61.3, NH (50,16 = 66) 50.2, WA (28, 37 = 65) 58.8, IL (13,51 = 64) 59.0, TX (32,31 = 63) 45.2,

OH (16,47 = 63) 45.8, UT (43,19 = 62) 37.7, ME (40,21 = 61) 51.5, AL (45,13 = 58) 35.6, CO (26,28 = 54) 52.7,

CT (36,17 = 53) 57.2, NV (12,39 = 51) 51.3, DE (41,9 = 50) 56.0, KY (39,11 = 50) 34.3, DC (20,29 =49) 90.9,

MI (23,23 = 46) 49.9, LA (18,27 = 45) 39.8, IN (21,20 = 41) 40.0, MN (17,24 = 41) 50.8,  PA (11,30 = 41) 49.6, KS (24,15 = 39) 38.8, OK (33,5 = 38) 30.7, WI (3,34 = 37) 49.6, WV (9,26 = 35) 27.9, VT (25,8 = 33) 65.2,

OR (14,14 = 28) 56.2,
MT (2,25 = 27) 38.9, HI (22,4 = 26) 67.5, RI (8,18 = 26) 58.3, ID (15,7 = 22) 31.7, IA (6,10 = 16) 44.9, SD (4,12 = 16) 34.0, AK (10,2 = 12) 41.6, WY (7,3 = 10) 24.3, ND (1,6 = 7) 30.2, NE (5,1 = 6) 36.4,

The 7 states with the highest and 18 pf the 22 states with the highest combined ranking for most bars and liquor stores per capita voted for Trump!


Percentage of traffic fatalities attributed to drunk driving
UT (17) 37.7, MN (25) 50.8, GA (25) 47.4, IN (25) 40.0, AR (25) 35.8, OK (25) 30.7, VT (26) 65.2, AZ (26) 48.1, KY (26) 34.3, NJ (27) 57.3,

MI (27) 49.9, OH (27) 45.8, ID (27) 31.7, WV (27) 27.9, FL (28) 49.4, TN (28) 36.4, NE (28) 36.4, CA (29) 66.1, ME (29) 51.5, NC (29) 48.1,

AK (29) 41.6,
KS (29) 38.8, WY (29) 24.3, DC (30) 90.9, MD (30) 63.8,

NY (30) 61.3, NM (30) 54.7, CO (30) 52.7, NV (30) 51.3, PA (30) 49.6,

SD (30) 34.0,
AL (31) 35.6, HI (32) 67.5, IL (32) 59.0, IA (32) 44.9,
WI (33) 49.6, MO (33) 39.9, LA (33) 39.8, WA (34) 58.8, OR (34) 56.2,

VA (34) 52.9, NH (34) 50.2, MS (34) 40.8, MA (36) 64.5, RI (37) 58.3, DE (38) 56.0, TX (40) 45.2, MT (40) 38.9, CT (41) 57.2, ND (42) 30.2, SC (44) 42.6,

G. Or perhaps just quit smoking... After looking at the states based on the ratio of beer consumption to wine consumption, I decided to look at them based on this list of cigarette smokers per 100 adults per state. It did not disappoint. With a couple of blips near the top due to the fact Mormons vote red but don't smoke, the list once again reflected the blue state/red state divide. Here it is:

UT (9.1) 37.7, CA (11.7) 66.1, CT (13.5) 57.2, NJ (13.5) 57.3, ID (13.8) 31.7, AZ (14.0) 48.1, MA (14.0) 64.5, HI (14.1) 67.5, WA (15.0) 58.8, IL (15.1) 59.0,
Avg. for the top ten

MD (15.1) 63.8, NY (15.2) 61.3, TX (15.2) 45.2, RI (15.5) 58.3, CO (15.6) 52.7, FL (15.8) 49.4, NH (15.9) 50.2, DC (16.0) 90.9, VT (16.0) 65.2, MN (16.2) 50.8,
Avg. for the second ten


VA (16.5) 52.9, NE (17.1) 36.4, OR (17.1) 56.2, WI (17.3) 49.6, DE (17.4) 56.0,

NV (17.5) 51.3, NM (17.5) 54.7, GA (17.7) 47.4, KS (17.7) 38.8, IA (18.1) 44.9,
Avg. for the third ten

PA (18.1) 49.6, ND (18.7) 30.2, MT (18.9) 38.9, NC (19.0) 48.1, AK (19.0) 41.6, WY (19.1) 24.3, ME (19.1) 51.5, SC (19.7) 42.6, SD (20.1) 34.0, IN (20.6) 40.0,
Avg. for the fourth ten

MI (20.7) 49.9, AL (21.4) 35.6, OH (21.6) 45.8, LA (21.9) 39.8, TN (21.9) 36.4, OK (22.2) 30.7,   MO (22.3) 39.9, MS (22.5) 40.8, AR (24.9) 35.8, WV (25.7) 27.9, KY (25.9) 34.3,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

H. Now prepare to get mad. While trying to figure out what factors other than race could have played a role in the election I took a look at the percentage of obese people per state. This wasn't just a random act. While looking at lines of Trump supporters outside his rallies on TV, it occurred to me that they seemed a bit fatter than normal. Even for Americans. I mean, these people looked like tanks in line during the battle of the bulge. Or should I say, the battle with the bulge. Sorry. In any event, let's see if my observation was correct. The list that follows presents the percentage of obese people by state in order from smallest percentage to largest percentage, along with the percentage of votes for Clinton against Trump. This list was created with the help of this chart and this chart.

First the original list based on the first number.

CO (20.2, 19.8) 52.7, DC (22.1, NA) 90.9, HI (22.7, 18.5) 67.5, MT (23.6, 24.1) 38.9, CA (24.2, 23.9) 66.1, MA (24.3, 23.6) 64.5, UT (24.5, 24.5) 37.7, NY (25.0, 25.2) 61.3, VT (25.1, 27.5) 65.2, CT (25.3, 24.9) 57.2,
Avg. for the top ten 60.2%

NJ (25.6, 24.7) 57.3, RI (26.0, 27.9) 58.3, MN (26.1, 25.5) 50.8, NH (26.3. 24.3) 50.2, WA (26.4, 27.1) 58.8, NV (26.7, 23.9) 51.3, FL (26.8, 26.5) 49.4, AZ (28.4, 25.2) 48.1, ID (28.6, 29.7) 31.7, NM (28.8, 23.7) 54.7,
Avg. for the second ten 51.1%

MD (28.9, 28.8) 63.8,
WY (29.0, 25.8) 24.3, VA (29.2, 26.3) 52.9, DE (29.7, 33.8) 56.0, OH (29.8, 31.6) 45.8,

So, here we go again. Fourteen of the sixteen least obese states voted for Clinton. And eighteen of the twenty-five least obese. That's a pretty good indicator, wouldn't you say, that lifestyle played a role in the election?

AK (29.8, 26.9) 41.6, ME (30.0, 31.5) 51.5, PA (30.0, 29.2) 49.6 OR (30.1, 27.1) 56.2, NC (30.1, 30.4) 48.1,
Avg. for the third ten 49.0%

SD (30.4, 25.1) 34.0, WI (30.7, 27.4) 49.6, GA (30.7, 28.8) 47.4, IL (30.8, 28.5) 59.0, ND (31.0, 31.3) 30.2, MI (31.2, 31.5) 49.9, IN (31.3, 30.8) 40.0, NE (31.4, 30.8) 36.4, SC (31.7, 31.4) 42.6, IA (32.1, 31.3) 44.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten 43.4%

TX (32.4, 30.7) 45.2, MO (32.4, 29.9) 39.9, TN (33.8, 29.5) 36.4, OK (33.9, 33.5) 30.7, KS (34.2, 29.4) 38.8, AR (34.5, 33.5) 35.8, KY (34.6, 31.4) 34.3, MS (35.6, 35.5) 40.8, AL (35.6, 31.3) 35.6, WV (35.6, 37.0) 27.9, LA (36.2, 30.9) 39.8,  
Avg. for the bottom eleven 36.8%


Now, a second list based upon the average of the two numbers.

CO (20.2, 19.8) 52.7, HI (22.7, 18.5) 67.5, DC (22.1, NA) 90.9, MT (23.6, 24.1) 38.9, MA (24.3, 23.6) 64.5, CA (24.2, 23.9) 66.1,  UT (24.5, 24.5) 37.7, NY (25.0, 25.2) 61.3, CT (25.3, 24.9) 57.2, NJ (25.6, 24.7) 57.3,
Avg. for the top ten

NV (26.7, 23.9) 51.3, NH (26.3. 24.3) 50.2, MN (26.1, 25.5) 50.8, NM (28.8, 23.7) 54.7,
VT (25.1, 27.5) 65.2, 
FL (26.8, 26.5) 49.4, WA (26.4, 27.1) 58.8, AZ (28.4, 25.2) 48.1, RI (26.0, 27.9) 58.3, WY (29.0, 25.8) 24.3,
Avg. for the second ten

VA (29.2, 26.3) 52.9, SD (30.4, 25.1) 34.0, AK (29.8, 26.9) 41.6, OR (30.1, 27.1) 56.2, MD (28.9, 28.8) 63.8,

ID (28.6, 29.7) 31.7, WI (30.7, 27.4) 49.6, PA (30.0, 29.2) 49.6, IL (30.8, 28.5) 59.0, GA (30.7, 28.8) 47.4,
Avg. for the third ten

So, here we go again.Thirteen of the fifteen least obese states voted for Clinton. And eighteen of the twenty-five least obese. That's a pretty good indicator, wouldn't you say, that lifestyle played a role in the election?

NC (30.1, 30.4) 48.1, OH (29.8, 31.6) 45.8,  ME (30.0, 31.5) 51.5, IN (31.3, 30.8) 40.0, NE (31.4, 30.8) 36.4, MO (32.4, 29.9) 39.9, ND (31.0, 31.3) 30.2, MI (31.2, 31.5) 49.9, TX (32.4, 30.7) 45.2, SC (31.7, 31.4) 42.6, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

TN (33.8, 29.5) 36.4, IA (32.1, 31.3) 44.9, DE (29.7, 33.8) 56.0, KS (34.2, 29.4) 38.8, KY (34.6, 31.4) 34.3, AL (35.6, 31.3) 35.6, LA (36.2, 30.9) 39.8, OK (33.9, 33.5) 30.7, AR (34.5, 33.5) 35.8, MS (35.6, 35.5) 40.8, WV (35.6, 37.0) 27.9, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven

List of obesity pct for non-hispanic whites

1-10:  DC (9.9) 90.9, HI (17.9) 67.5, CO (19.1) 52.7, CA (22.2) 66.1, NM (22.8) 54.7, MA (23.0) 64.5, MT (23.8) 38.9, CT (24.0) 57.2, AZ (24.4) 48.1, UT (24.5) 37.7,

11-20: VT (24.8) 65.2, NY (24.9) 61.3, FL (25.2) 49.4, NJ (25.6) 57.3, NV (26.3) 51.3, RI (26.4) 58.3, MN (26.5) 50.8, MD (26.7) 63.8, VA (26.7) 52.9, NC (27.2) 48.1,

21-25: NH (27.3) 50.2, WA (27.7) 58.8, AK (27.7) 41.6, TX (27.9) 45.2, GA (28.0) 47.4,
 
26-30: WY (28.0) 24.3, OR (28.1) 56.2, ID (28.1) 31.7, IL (28.3) 59.0, SC (28.3) 42.6,
 

31-40: ME (29.2) 51.5, DE (29.4) 56.0, PA (29.5) 49.6, SD (29.6) 34.0, WI (29.8) 49.6, NE (30.0) 36.4, MI (30.2) 49.9, MO (30.4) 39.9, OH (30.5) 45.8, KS (31.0) 38.8,

41-51: AL (31.1) 35.6, IN (31.3) 40.0, ND (31.3) 30.2, MS (31.5) 40.8, TN (31.5) 36.4, IA (31.6) 44.9, LA (31.9) 39.8, OK (32.5) 30.7, KY (32.9) 34.3, AR (33.2) 35.8, WV (35.2) 27.9,

Yep, it's pretty clear. All of Clinton's victories came within the first forty states. She won twenty of the thirty-three least obese states. And seventeen of the eighteen most obese states voted for Trump. Sadly, the Big, (and by big I mean BIG) eleven ALL voted for Trump.

I later looked at this list reflecting the over-all health of the states to be more fair, and found it gave similar results.

I also came across this list of the fattest county for each state, and compared that to how these counties voted. The results were fairly surprising. It turns out that some of the fattest counties in the fattest states are heavily minority counties--mostly African-American or native America--that voted for Clinton. But that most of the fattest counties in the other states were heavily white--and voted for Trump in much greater numbers than votes in the rest of the state. Here's a list of the fattest county in each state, in order of the fattest and whitest (The first number is the obesity rate for the county, the second number is the pct. of whites in the county, then comes the name of the county, and then finally comes the pct. shift for Clinton from the state as a whole, where 5% pro Clinton to 5 % pro Trump = 10.)

Sort by O plus W--compare to (pct)

Blue states where the fattest county trended blue (Clinton wins 2 of 2)
NM (35.1 O 16.39 W, McKinley 31.2) 54.7 (70.3), VA (41.4 O 18.5 W, Petersburg City 70.5) 52.9 (88.2),

Red states where the fattest county trended blue (Clinton wins 11 of 14)
SD (42.9 O 4.51 W, Oglala Lakota 108.0) 34.0 (88.0), WI (42.5 O 11.57 W, Menominee 58.4) 49.6 (78.8), AZ (35.2 O 19.50 W, Apache 41.0) 48.1 (68.6), GA (38.0 O 18.9 W, Clayton 77.6) 47.4 (86.2), MS (47.6 O 15.18 W, Claiborne 90.0) 40.8 (85.8), AL (46.3 O 19.09 W Greene 93.5) 35.6 (81.9), ND (41.4 O 25.12 W, Rolette 60.6) 30.2 (60.5), MT (38.8 O 36.60 W, Big Horn 25.9) 38.9 (51.9), SC (44.3 O 35.03 W, Lee 43.4) 42.6 (64.3), NC (40.8 O 40.06 W, Edgecombe 36.0) 48.1 (66.1), AR (45.5 O 39.25 W, Phillips 53.3) 35.8 (62.5), 
NE (41.8 O 46.77 W, Thurston 21.3) 36.4 (46.6), AK (39.7 O 52.54 W, Bristol Bay NA) 41.6 (App. 41.6), LA (42.1 O 51.79 W, East Feliciana 6.4) 39.8 (43.0),

AK is ???? Only 2 states over 50% white--both of which fell to Trump!

Blue states where the fattest county trended red (Clinton wins 5 of 18)
HI (22.7 O 34.5 W, Hawaii -4.3) 67.5 (65.3), MD (42.2 O 53.5 W, Somerset -43.2) 63.8 (42.2), NJ (34.5 O 62.74 W, Cumberland -7.9) 57.3 (53.3), CA (32.6 O 65.6 W, Stanislaus -28.1) 66.1 (52.0), DE (32.8 O 67.8 W, Kent -16.4) 56.0 (47.8), CO (27.6 O 87.28 W, Kit Carson -68.3) 52.7 (18.5), MA (28.3 O 88.4 W, Bristol -18.0) 64.5 (55.5), NV (31.5 O 85.9 W, Nye -44.4) 51.3 (29.1), CT (29.6 O 89.6 W, Windham -21.2 ) 57.2 (46.6), OR (34.5 O 85.9 W, Polk -17.6) 56.2 (47.4), WA (36.9 O 84.9 W, Gray's Harbor -23.2) 58.8 (47.2), RI (28.8 O 93.4 W, Kent -16.4) 58.3 (50.1), VT (29.8 O NA app 94, W, Essex -46.4) 65.2 (42.0), NH (31.3 O 96.6 W, Belknap -17.2) 50.2 (41.6), MN (36.2 O 91.9 W, Pine -27.8) 50.8 (36.9), IL (37.0 O 93.7 W, Adams -63.6) 59.0 (28.2), NY (33.7 O 98.17 W, Lewis -61.0) 61.3 (30.8), ME (35.0 O 97.1 W, Somerset -25.5) 51.5 (38.7), 

Red states where the fattest county trended red (Clinton wins 0 of 16)
KS (38.6 O 65.44 W, Seward -11.4) 38.8 (33.1), MI (38.9 O 70.5 W, Saginaw -0.9) 49.9 (49.4), TX (37.5 O 75.1 W, Angelina -38.1) 45.2 (26.1), ID (34.2 O 80.2 W, Minidoka -22.5) 31.7 (20.4), FL (39.6 O 76.41 W, Liberty -56.0) 49.4 (21.4), UT (33.5 O 91.77 W, Box Elder -22.6) 37.7 (26.4), WY (34.3 O 93.2 W, Campbell -33.0) 24.3 (7.8), MO (37.6 O 90.03 W, Saline -15.5) 39.9 (32.1), TN (38.6 O 92.22 W, McNairy -33.5) 36.4 (19.6), WV (42.1 O 89.1 W, McDowell -9.4) 27.9 (23.2), PA (38.5 O 93.3 W, Fayette -29.8) 49.6 (34.7), OH (38.8 O 95.9 W, Lawrence -35.3) 45.8 (28.1), IN (38.2 O 97.3 W, Lawrence -32.2) 40.0 (23.9), IA (37.8 O 98.44 W, Union -18.1) 44.9 (35.8), OK (40.6 O 95.8 W, Washita -34.1) 30.7 (13.6), KY (43.2 O 97.18 W Leslie -50.7) 34.3 (8.9),

So...where do we begin? The fattest county in the 20 states voting for Clinton skewed towards Trump 18 times, with the only two counties skewing towards Clinton being heavily black or Native American counties. More surprising, 13 of the 18 skewing towards Trump skewed enough to cross over the line.

As far as the Trump states, it's even more surprising. The fattest county in 14 of the Trump states skewed towards Clinton, with Clinton actually winning 11 of these counties. But, look again. The 11 counties falling for Clinton were all heavily black or Native American counties. The largest percentage of whites in these counties was 40%! Here, then, is a breakdown of the pct. of whites for the 16 states skewing towards Clinton.

Skewing towards Clinton, where Clinton wins (13)
4.51, 11.57, 15.18, 16.39, 18.5, 18.9, 19.09, 19.5, 25.12, 35.03, 36.6, 39.25, 40.06, 

Skewing towards Clinton, where Trump wins (3)
46.77, 51.79, 52.54,

Skewing toward Trump, where Trump wins (29)
53.5, 65.44, 67.8, 70.5, 75.1, 76.41, 80.2, 85.9, 84.9, 85.9, 87.28, 89.1, 89.6, 90.03, 91.77, 91.9, 92.22, 93.2, 93.3, 93.7, 94, 95.8, 95.9, 96.6, 97.1, 97.18, 97.3, 98.17, 98.44

HOLY SMOKES! There's nothing suggestive about that, is there? It's a pattern with 100% conformity. This leaves but five outliers, if you will.

Skewing toward Trump where Clinton wins (5)
34.5, 62.74, 65.6, 88.4, 93.4

Now, non-hispanic whites make up 63% of the population, 69% of the voters, and 76% of the deaths between 2012 and 2016. This gives us reason to suspect the next election will have a different result.

Well, this overlap between whiteness and obesity among Trump supporters made me wonder if this dark picture extended onto family issues--such as unwanted pregnancy, high birth rates, and divorce.

I. Let's look, then, at this list and put it into order of states by pct of pregnant 15-19 year-olds receiving an abortion.

NY (58) 61.3, NJ (55) 57.3, CT (52) 57.2, DE (47) 56.0, MA (46) 64.5, MD (45) 63.8, HI (42) 67.5, RI (41) 58.3, DC (41) 90.9, FL (38) 49.4,
Avg. for the top ten

CA (38) 66.1, WA (37) 58.8, NH (35) 50.2, PA (35) 49.6, VT (34) 65.2, NV (34) 51.3, VA (33) 52.9, MI (32) 49.9, IL (32) 59.0, ME (31) 51.5,
Avg. for the second ten

AK (30) 41.6, OR (29) 56.2, MN (25) 50.8, OH (25) 45.8, NC (24) 48.1,

GA (24) 47.4, IA (23) 44.9, SC (23) 42.6, NM (22) 54.7, WI (21) 49.6,  
Avg, for the third ten

MT (21) 38.9, CO (20) 52.7, MO (19) 39.9, ND (18) 30.2, TN (18) 36.4, AZ (18) 48.1, LA (18) 39.8, ID (17) 31.7, WY (17) 24.3, WV (17) 27.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

AL (17) 35.6, IN (16) 40.0, TX (15) 45.2, NE (14) 36.4, MS (14) 40.8, AR (14) 35.8, UT (13) 37.7, OK (13) 30.7, KS (12) 38.8, KY (12) 34.3, SD (11) 34.0,
Avg. for bottom eleven

So, there it is again. As one could have predicted, the top nine, and nineteen of the twenty-three states and districts in which teens have the highest rates of abortion, voted for Clinton, while the bottom nineteen, and twenty-six of the twenty-eight states and districts in which teens have the lowest rates of abortion, voted for Trump. Perhaps even more illustrative: Clinton received 38.9 pct or more of the votes in the thirty-three states and districts with the highest abortion rates, but less than that in thirteen of the eighteen states with the lowest abortion rates.


Pct. of pregnant teens
NH (28) 50.2, VT (32) 65.2, MN (36) 50.8, ME (37) 51.5, MA (37) 64.5, UT (38) 37.7, WI (39) 49.6, ND (42) 30.2, NE (43) 36.4, CT (44) 57.2,

IA (44) 44.9, RI (44) 58.3, ID (47) 31.7, OR (47) 56.2, SD (47) 34.0, VA (48) 52.9, PA (49) 49.6, WA (49) 58.8, CO (50) 52.7, NJ (51) 57.3,

MI (52) 49.9, IN (53) 40.0, KS (53) 38.8, MT (53) 38.9, MO (54) 39.9,

OH (54) 45.8, WY (56) 24.3, IL (57) 59.0, MD (57) 63.8, CA (59) 66.1,

NC (59) 48.1, AZ (60) 48.1, FL (60) 49.4, AL (62) 35.6, KY (62) 34.3, TN (62) 36.4, NY (63) 61.3, AK (64) 41.6, GA (64) 47.4, WV (64) 27.9,

HI (65) 67.5, SC (65) 42.6, DE (67) 56.0, NV (68) 51.3, LA (69) 39.8, OK (69) 30.7, AR (73) 35.8, TX (73) 45.2, MS (76) 40.8, NM (80) 54.7, DC (90) 90.9



HIV
NH (1.9) 50.2, VT (2.0) 65.2, MT (2.2) 38.9, ID (2.8) 31.7, WY (3.1) 24.3, SD (3.3) 34.0, ND (3.5) 30.2, ME (3.9) 51.5, AK (4.0) 41.6, WI (4.7) 49.6,

WV (4.7) 27.9,
IA (4.8) 44.9, UT (5.0) 37.7, NE (5.2) 36.4, KS (6.1) 38.8, OR (6.2) 56.2, MN (6.3) 50.8, RI (7.0) 58.3, WA (7.4) 58.8, NM (7.8) 54.7,

CO (8.2) 52.7,
MI (8.7) 49.9, CT (8.8) 57.2, MO (9.1) 39.9, KY (9.1) 34.3,

OH (9.5) 45.8,
HI (9.6) 67.5, OK (9.9) 30.7, MA (10.3) 64.5, AR (10.4) 35.8,

PA (10.7) 49.6, IN (11.5) 40.0,
AL (11.8) 35.6, AZ (12.7) 48.1, TN (12.9) 36.4, DE (13.6) 56.0, VA (13.6) 52.9, IL (13.7) 59.0, CA (14.5) 66.1, NJ (15.8) 57.3,

NC (15.9) 48.1, SC (16.9) 42.6, NY (18.6) 61.3, NV (20.1) 51.3, TX (20.1) 45.2, MS (20.6) 40.8, MD (26.7) 63.8, FL (27.9) 49.4, GA (28.3) 47.4, LA (29.2) 39.8, DC (66.1) 90.9


J. Well, what about STD's, then? We added up chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis cases per 100,00 from the CDC website.

NH (255.3) 50.2, WV (312.8) 27.9, VT (329.8) 65.2, ME (331.2) 51.5, UT (348.5) 37.7, ID (377.0) 31.7, WY (379.6) 24.3, MA (420.5) 64.5, CT (425.5) 57.2, NJ (435.8) 57.3,
Avg. for the top ten

IA (463.3) 44.9, MN (468.8) 50.8, KS (484.8) 38.8, MT (493.1) 38.9, RI (494.9) 58.3, OR (499.7) 56.2, KY (504.4) 34.3, WA (514.7) 58.8, WI (515.9) 49.6, NE (516.3) 36.4, 
Avg. for the second ten

ND (521.7) 30.2, PA (523.2) 49.6, VA (525.5) 52.9, CO (532.0) 52.7, IN (561.2) 40.0,

MD (582.8) 63.8,
FL (586.3) 49.4, MI (587.2) 49.9, SD (590.5) 34.0, HI (591.7) 67.5,
Avg, for the third ten

NV (595.1) 51.3, TN (610.8) 36.4, AZ (612.8.) 48.1, MO (630.5) 39.9, DE (636.6) 56.0, OH (637.1) 45.8, CA (640.1) 66.1, NY (663.9) 61.3, TX (676.8) 45.2, IL (681.8) 59.0,
Avg. for the fourth ten

AL (697.4) 35.6, AR (710.5) 35.8, OK (716.6) 30.7, NM (730.4) 54.7, GA (742.8) 47.4, SC (746.0) 42.6, MS (780.5) 40.8, NC (858.4) 48.1, AK (920.5) 41.6, LA (931.2) 39.8, DC (1628.5) 90.9,
Avg. for bottom eleven

While this at first looks unimpressive, with Clinton winning both the least and most infected state or district, the long view is more convincing. Nine of the eleven most infected states and districts were won by Trump.

SUBTRACTING SYPHILIS

NH (252.3) 50.2, WV (310.0) 27.9, VT (328.4) 65.2, ME (329.1) 51.5, UT (346.3) 37.7, ID (373.5) 31.7, WY (378.7) 24.3, MA (414.3) 64.5, CT (422.9) 57.2, NJ (431.6) 57.3,
Avg. for the top ten

IA (460.9) 44.9, MN (464.3) 50.8, KS (481.8) 38.8, RI (487.6) 58.3, OR (491.0) 56.2, MT (491.8) 38.9, KY (501.1) 34.3, WA (508.4) 58.8, NE (513.9) 36.4, WI (514.5) 49.6, 
Avg. for the second ten

PA (518.1) 49.6, ND (520.2) 30.2, VA (521.5) 52.9, CO (527.4) 52.7, IN (556.9) 40.0,

MD (574.3) 63.8,
FL (575.8) 49.4, MI (583.1) 49.9, NV (583.3) 51.3, HI (585.3) 67.5,
Avg, for the third ten

SD (585.9) 34.0, AZ (604.1.) 48.1, TN (605.5) 36.4, MO (625.4) 39.9, CA (627.5) 66.1, DE (632.2) 56.0, OH (632.3) 45.8, NY (653.7) 61.3, TX (670.6) 45.2, IL (673.4) 59.0,
Avg. for the fourth ten

AL (691.6) 35.6, AR (706.0) 35.8, OK (711.2) 30.7, NM (724.7) 54.7, GA (728.8) 47.4, SC (739.9) 42.6, MS (773.2) 40.8, NC (846.4) 48.1, LA (916.2) 39.8, AK (919.4) 41.6, DC (1628.5) 90.9,
Avg. for bottom eleven

Clinton 15 of the top 30, Trump 15 of the bottom 20.



IRRESPONSIBLE SEX rankings for Teenage pregnancy, STD and HIV added together
NH (3) 50.2, VT (6) 65.2, ME (16) 51.5, ID (23) 31.7, UT (24) 37.7, MN (32) 50.8, IA (34) 44.9, WI (36) 49.6, ND (36) 30.2, WY (39) 24.3,

MT (41) 38.9, MA (42) 64.5, CT (42) 57.2, NE (43) 36.4, RI (45) 58.3, OR (46) 56.2, SD (50) 34.0, KS (51) 38.8, WV (53) 27.9, WA (55) 58.8,

CO (64) 52.7,
NJ (70) 57.3, PA (70) 49.6, MI (71) 49.9, KY (77) 34.3,

IN (79) 40.0, VA (81) 52.9, MO (83) 39.9, OH (88) 45.8, AK (96) 41.6,

HI (98) 67.5,
AZ (99) 48.1, MD (102) 63.8, TN (103) 36.4, CA (106) 66.1, IL (106) 59.0, FL (108) 49.4, AL (108) 35.6, DE (114) 56.0, NM (114) 54.7,
 

OK (117) 30.7, NY (118) 61.3, NV (119) 51.3, AR (119) 35.8, NC (120) 48.1, SC (130) 42.6, TX (132) 45.2, GA (133) 47.4, MS (142) 40.8, LA (145) 39.8, DC (153) 90.9


K. And here's a more telling list relating to the fertility rates per state, from lowest to highest.

DC (1.48) 90.9, MA (1.55) 64.5, VT (1.58) 65.2, RI (1.58) 58.3, NH (1.59) 50.2, CT (1.61) 57.2, ME (1.64) 51.5, OR (1.70) 56.2, NY (1.71) 61.3, PA (1.74) 49.6, 
Avg. for the top ten

CO (1.75) 52.7, FL (1.77) 49.4, WV (1.78) 27.9, CA (1.79) 66.1, SC (1.79) 42.6, MD (1.80) 63.8, VA (1.80) 52.9, NJ (1.80) 57.3, MI (1.81) 49.9, IL (1.81) 59.0,
Avg. for the second ten

DE (1.81) 56.0, WA (1.82) 58.8, NC (1.82) 48.1, AL (1.83) 35.6, GA (1.85) 47.4,  

TN (1.85) 36.4, WI (1.85) 49.6, MO (1.86) 39.9, NV (1.86) 51.3, MS (1.87) 40.8,
Avg, for the third ten

OH (1.87) 45.8, NM (1.90) 54.7, AZ (1.92) 48.1, MN (1.93) 50.8, IN (1.93) 40.0, KY (1.95) 34.3, LA (1.96) 39.8, MT (1.96) 38.9, HI (1.97) 67.5, AR (1.98) 35.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OK (2.00) 30.7, IA (2.01) 44.9, WY (2.01) 24.3, KS (2.05) 38.8, TX (2.07) 45.2, ID (2.13) 31.7, NE (2.15) 36.4, ND (2.16) 30.2, AK (2.17) 41.6, SD (2.27) 34.0, UT (2.29) 37.7, 
Avg. for bottom eleven

Yep. 17 of the 21 lowest voted for Clinton, while the 12 highest, and 16 of the 17 highest, voted for Trump.


L. And here's a similar list created from a map showing the median age for first marriages by men, and a similar list showing the median age for first marriages by women. The numbers were then added together. 

DC (30.6 + 30.2 = 60.8) 90.9, MA (30.1 + 29.3 = 59.4) 64.5, NY (30.3 + 29.1 = 59.4) 61.3,
RI (30.2 + 29.0 = 59.2) 58.3, NJ (30.1 + 28.6 = 58.7) 57.3, CT (30.0 + 28.7 = 58.7) 57.2,
MD (29.5 + 28.1 = 57.6) 63.8, CA (29.5 + 27.9 = 57.4) 66.1, VT (29.6 + 27.8 = 57.4) 65.2, PA (29.3 + 28.0 = 57.3) 49.6, 
Avg. for the second ten

IL (29.3 + 27.9 = 57.2) 59.0, FL (29.4 + 27.8 = 57.2) 49.4, DE (29.0 + 28.0 = 57.0) 56.0, VA (29.6 + 26.9 = 56.5) 52.9, NH (29.3 + 27.2 = 56.5) 50.2, MI (28.9 + 27.3 = 56.2) 49.9, WI (28.9 + 27.0 = 55.9) 49.6, ME (28.6 + 27.2 = 55.8) 51.5, OR (28.5 + 27.1 = 55.6) 56.2, SC (28.2 + 27.3 = 55.5) 42.6,  
Avg. for the second ten

LA (28.2 + 27.3 = 55.5) 39.8, MN (28.5 + 26.9 = 55.4) 50.8, HI (28.6 + 26.7 = 55.3) 67.5, OH (28.4 + 26.9 = 55.3) 45.8, GA (28.3 + 26.8 = 55.1) 47.4, 
 
NM (28.1 + 26.8 = 54.9) 54.7, AZ (28.1 + 26.7 = 54.8) 48.1, NV (28.1 + 26.6 = 54.7) 51.3,
CO (28.0 + 26.5 = 54.5) 52.7,
NC (27.9 + 26.6 = 54.5) 48.1,
Avg, for the third ten

MT (28.5 + 26.0 = 54.5) 38.9, WA (27.9 + 26.4 = 54.3) 58.8, MO (27.6 + 26.5 = 54.1) 39.9, MS (27.5 + 26.3 = 53.8) 40.8, IN (27.4 + 26.4 = 53.8) 40.0, TX (27.5 + 26.1 = 53.6) 45.2, TN (27.4 + 26.1 = 53.5) 36.4, AL (27.4 + 26.1 = 53.5) 35.6, ND (27.5 + 26.0 = 53.5) 30.2, IA (27.4 + 25.9 = 53.3) 44.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

WV (27.3 + 26.0 = 53.3) 27.9, NE (27.2 + 26.0 = 53.2) 36.4, AK (27.4 + 25.5 = 52.9) 41.6, KY (27.1 + 25.7 = 52.8) 34.3, SD (27.0 + 25.8 = 52.8) 34.0, KS (27.0 + 25.7 = 52.7) 38.8, WY (26.8 + 25.2 = 52.0) 24.3, OK (26.3 + 25.2 = 51.5) 30.7, AR (26.3 + 25.1 = 51.4) 35.8, ID (25.8 + 24.7 = 50.5) 31.7, UT (25.6 + 23.8 = 49.4) 37.7, 
Avg. for bottom eleven

So, there it is again. Clinton won the top nine, and 13 of the top 15, states with the oldest first time newlyweds, and Trump won the 19 states with the youngest first time newlyweds.

M. Well, what about the divorce rate then? This list of people identifying as divorced per 1,000 residents was consulted.

NJ (6) 57.3, MN (7) 50.8, WI (7) 49.6, MA (7) 64.5, NY (7) 61.3, DC (7) 90.9, PA (7) 49.6,
MD (8) 63.8, ND (8) 30.2, ID (8) 31.7,
Avg. for the top ten

SC (8) 42.6, IL (8) 59.0, CA (8) 66.1, HI (8) 67.5, CT (8) 57.2, DE (8) 56.0, NE (9) 36.4, NH (9) 50.2, VA (9) 52.9, FL (9) 49.4,
Avg. for the second ten

OH (9) 45.8, MI (9) 49.9, SD (9) 34.0, RI (9) 58.3, IA (10) 44.9,

IN (10) 40.0, MO (27) 39.9, KS (10) 38.8, LA (10) 39.8, CO (10) 52.7, 
Avg. for the third ten

WY (10) 24.3, MT (10) 38.9, WA (10) 58.8, NM (10) 54.7, NC (10) 48.1, VT (10) 65.2, OR (10) 56.2, UT (10) 37.7, AZ (11) 48.1, WV (11) 27.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

TX (11) 45.2, GA (11) 47.4, TN (11) 36.4, ME (11) 51.5, MS (11) 40.8, NV (12) 51.3, OK (13) 30.7, KY (13) 34.3, AL (13) 35.6, AR (13) 35.8, AK (14) 41.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Hmmm...while not as good a metric as others, the number of divorced people was yet another soft indicator that a state was red or blue. Five of the six states with the least number of divorced residents voted for Clinton. And 11 of 16. Meanwhile, 12 of the 14 states with the highest percentage of divorced residents voted for Trump.


N. And here's a list built upon this list measuring each state's attitudes towards women.

DC (NA) 90.9,
HI (1) 67.5,
AK (2) 41.6, ME (3) 51.5, CA (4) 66.1, VT (5) 65.2, NH (6) 50.2, MN (7) 50.8, MD (8) 63.8, NY (9) 61.3, WI (10) 49.6,
Avg. for the top ten


WA (11) 58.8,
ND (12) 30.2, OR (13) 56.2, WV (14) 27.9, MO (15) 39.9, MA (16) 64.5, IL (17) 59.0, IA (18) 44.9, NM (19) 54.7, NV (20) 51.3,
Avg. for the second ten

SD (21) 34.0, NE (22) 36.4, CO (23) 52.7, AZ (24) 48.1, WY (25) 24.3, 

IN (26) 40.0,  FL (27) 49.4, MI (28) 49.9, DE (29) 56.0, KS (30) 38.8,
Avg. for the third ten

TN (31) 36.4, MT (32) 38.9, AR (33) 35.8, CT (34) 57.2, AL (35) 35.6, NC (36) 48.1, ID (37) 31.7, TX (38) 45.2, RI (39) 58.3, OH (40) 45.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

VA (41) 52.9,
OK (42) 30.7, KY (43) 34.3, MS (44) 40.8, SC (45) 42.6, LA (46) 39.8, PA (47) 49.6, NJ (48) 57.3, GA (49) 47.4, UT (50) 37.7,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Sadly, it's not exactly a surprise that Clinton won 15 of the top 23, and Trump won 22 of the bottom 27.

O. And here's a list regarding the rape rate per 100,000 residents for each state. This list is built upon this list.

NJ (11.7) 57.3, NY (14.7) 61.3, VA (17.7) 52.9, VT (19.3) 65.2, NC (20.3) 48.1, HI (20.5) 67.5, CA (20.6) 66.1, MD (21.0) 63.8, WI (21.3) 49.6, GA (21.4) 47.4,
Avg. for the top ten

WV (22.7) 27.9, MA (24.7) 64.5, MO (25.1) 39.9, LA (25.2) 39.8, IN (25.5) 40.0, CT (25.6) 57.2, PA (26.1) 49.6, DE (26.5) 56.0, WY (26.7) 24.3, AL (26.9) 35.6, 
Avg. for the second ten

FL (27.2) 49.4, RI (27.4) 58.3, MS (27.5) 40.8, IL (27.7) 59.0, ME (28.0) 51.5,

IA (28.3) 44.9, KY (29.0) 34.3, OR (29.2) 56.2, TX (29.6) 45.2, ID (30.0) 31.7,
Avg. for the third ten

MN (30.5) 50.8, TN (31.5) 36.4, OH (31.7) 45.8, WA (31.8) 58.8, UT (33.0) 37.7, NV (33.7) 51.3, NH (34.0) 50.2, AZ (34.7) 48.1, SC (35.5) 42.6, KS (36.5) 38.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

DC (37.3) 90.9, MT (37.7) 38.9, NE (38.3) 36.4, ND (38.9) 30.2, CO (40.7) 52.7, OK (41.6) 30.7, AR (42.3) 35.8, NM (45.9) 54.7, MI (46.4) 49.9, SD (70.2) 34.0, AK (79.7) 41.6,     
Avg. for the bottom eleven


Not entirely convincing, but suggestive. Clinton won 7 of the 8 states with the lowest rape rate, and Trump won 11 of the 13 states with the highest rate rape. (DC excluded)


P. And here's a list purported to represent the percentage of LGBT adults by state.

DC (7.8) 90.9, HI (5.1) 67.5, OR (4.9) 56.2, VT (4.9) 65.2, ME (4.8) 51.5, RI (4.5) 58.3, MA (4.4) 64.5, SD (4.4) 34.0, NV (4.2) 51.3, CA (4.0) 66.1,
Avg. for the top ten

WA (4.0) 58.8, AZ (3.9) 48.1, KY (3.9) 34.3, NY (3.8) 61.3, IL (3.8) 59.0, MI (3.8) 49.9, NJ (3.7) 57.3, IN (3.7) 40.0, KS (3.7) 38.8, NH (3.7) 50.2,
Avg. for the second ten

TX (3.6) 45.2, OH (3.6) 45.8, FL (3.5) 49.4, GA (3.5) 47.4, AR (3.5) 35.8,

OK (3.4) 30.7, CT (3.4) 57.2, DE (3.4) 56.0, AK (3.4) 41.6, NC (3.3) 48.1,
Avg. for the third ten

MO (3.3) 39.9, MD (3.3) 63.8, CO (3.2) 52.7, LA (3.2) 39.8, WV (.3.1) 27.9, VA (2.9) 52.9, MN (2.9) 50.8, SC (2.9) 42.6, NM (2.9) 54.7, WY (2.9) 24.3,
Avg. for the fourth ten     

WI (2.8) 49.6, AL (2.8) 35.6, IA (2.8) 44.9, PA (2.7) 49.6, UT (2.7) 37.7, NE (2.7) 36.4,
ID (2.7) 31.7, TN (2.6) 36.4, MS (2.6) 40.8, MT (2.6) 38.9, ND (1.7) 30.2, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven


HIV
NH (1.9) 50.2, VT (2.0) 65.2, MT (2.2) 38.9, ID (2.8) 31.7, WY (3.1) 24.3, SD (3.3) 34.0, ND (3.5) 30.2, ME (3.9) 51.5, AK (4.0) 41.6, WI (4.7) 49.6,

WV (4.7) 27.9,
IA (4.8) 44.9, UT (5.0) 37.7, NE (5.2) 36.4, KS (6.1) 38.8, OR (6.2) 56.2, MN (6.3) 50.8, RI (7.0) 58.3, WA (7.4) 58.8, NM (7.8) 54.7,

CO (8.2) 52.7,
MI (8.7) 49.9, CT (8.8) 57.2, MO (9.1) 39.9, KY (9.1) 34.3,

OH (9.5) 45.8,
HI (9.6) 67.5, OK (9.9) 30.7, MA (10.3) 64.5, AR (10.4) 35.8,

PA (10.7) 49.6, IN (11.5) 40.0,
AL (11.8) 35.6, AZ (12.7) 48.1, TN (12.9) 36.4, DE (13.6) 56.0, VA (13.6) 52.9, IL (13.7) 59.0, CA (14.5) 66.1, NJ (15.8) 57.3,

NC (15.9) 48.1, SC (16.9) 42.6, NY (18.6) 61.3, NV (20.1) 51.3, TX (20.1) 45.2, MS (20.6) 40.8, MD (26.7) 63.8, FL (27.9) 49.4, GA (28.3) 47.4, LA (29.2) 39.8, DC (66.1) 90.9

Q. The thought then occurred that perhaps a better measure of likely Trump voters would be the number of high school graduates who did not go on to get a bachelor's degree per one hundred adults. Those numbers, taken from this chart, are reflected in the list below.

DC (48.6) 90.9 CA (50.7) 66.1 MA (50.8) 64.5 MD (51.7) 63.8 NY (52.3) 61.3 VA (52.6) 52.9 NJ (52.9) 57.3 CT (53.0) 57.2 CO (53.4) 52.7 RI (54.2) 58.3
Avg for the top ten 62.5% Top seven 65.2%
 

IL (55.8) 59.0 TX (54.4) 45.2 GA (56.4) 47.4 NM (57.5) 54.7 NC (57.8) 48.1 VT (57.9) 65.2 AZ (58.6) 48.1 WA (58.7) 58.8 DE (58.7) 56.0 NH (59.3) 50.2
Avg for the second ten 53.3%

SC (59.3) 42.6 OR (59.9) 56.2 FL (60.0) 49.4 TN (60.1) 36.4 AL (60.1) 35.6

MN (60.2) 50.8 KS (60.2) 38.8 KY (60.7) 34.3 HI (60.8) 67.5 MS (60.8) 40.8
Avg for the third ten 45.2%

LA (60.8) 39.8 PA (61.5) 49.6 MO (61.6) 39.9 UT (61.9) 37.7 NV (62.1) 51.3 NE (62.4) 36.4 OK (62.9) 30.7 ME (63.3) 51.5 MI (63.3) 49.9 MT (63.4) 38.9
Avg for the fourth ten 42.6%

OH (63.5) 45.8 AR (63.5) 35.8 WI (64.1) 49.6 IN (64.1) 40.0 ND (64.3) 30.2 ID (64.4) 31.7 AK (64.8) 41.6 SD (64.8) 34.0 WV (65.5) 27.9 IA (66.3) 44.9 WY (68.0) 24.3
Avg for the bottom eleven is 36.9% Bottom seven 33.5%

Percentage of STEM science technology engineering mathematics jobs, according to this list

1-10: WA (9.2) 58.8, MD (9.1) 63.8, MA (9.0) 64.5, VA (9.0) 52.9, CO (8.4) 52.7, CA (7.6) 66.1, DE (7.1) 56.0, MI (7.1) 49.9, MN (6.9) 50.8, OR (6.8) 56.2,

11-20: AZ (6.8) 48.1,
CT (6.6) 57.2, TX (6.6) 45.2, NJ (6.5) 57.3, NM (6.5) 54.7, AK (6.5) 41.6, NH (6.4) 50.2, ID (6.0) 31.7, NC (5.8) 48.1, OH (5.8) 45.8,

21-25: VT (5.7) 65.2,
IL (5.7) 59.0, RI (5.7) 58.3, PA (5.7) 49.6, GA (5.7) 47.4 

26-30: WI (5.5) 49.6, AL (5.4) 35.6, MO (5.3) 39.9, MT (5.2) 38.9, NY (5.1) 61.3,

31-40:
KS (5.1) 38.8,
OK (5.1) 30.7, NE (5.0) 36.4, IN (4.9) 40.0, IA (4.8) 44.9, SC 4.8) 42.6, UT (4.8) 37.7, WY (4.8) 24.3, ME (4.6) 51.5, FL (4.5) 49.4,

41-50: TN (4.5) 36.4,
SD (4.4) 34.0, HI (4.3) 67.5, ND (4.1) 30.2, KY (4.0) 34.3, LA (3.9) 39.8, AR (3.9) 35.8, WV (3.5) 27.9, NV (3.3) 51.3, MS (3.2) 40.8




R. And then there's this: Total environmental release of toxic waste per capita per year by state (in pounds, according to this list, with the population taken from the 2010 census.)

DC (.10) 90.9,
VT (.32) 65.2, RI (.75) 58.3, MA (.96) 64.5, CA (1.17) 66.1, CT (1.23) 57.2, HI (1.96) 67.5, NY (2.00) 61.3, NJ (2.15) 57.3, WA (2.83) 58.8,
Avg. for the top ten

NH (3.24) 50.2,
CO (4.02) 52.7, MN (4.50) 50.8, WI (4.97) 49.6, NM (5.20) 54.7, OR (6.12) 56.2, ME (6.58) 51.5, OK (6.66) 30.7, MD (7.02) 63.8, MI (7.18) 49.9,
Avg. for the second ten

FL (7.74) 49.4, IL (8.08) 59.0, KS (8.38) 38.8, DE (8.59) 56.0, VA (8.62) 52.9,

PA (8.69) 49.6, TX (9.24) 45.2, IA (9.89) 44.9, AR (10.34) 35.8, NC (12.06) 48.1, 
Avg, for the third ten

GA (12.67) 47.4, SC (13.11) 42.6, SD (14.01) 34.0, NE (15.18) 36.4, MO (17.63) 39.9, OH (18.07) 45.8, KY (19.47) 34.3, MS (20.23) 40.8, IN (20.82) 40.0, ND (21.83) 30.2,
Avg. for the fourth ten

TN (22.86) 36.4, AL (23.94) 35.6, LA (26.01) 39.8, WY (29.11) 24.3, MT (31.67) 38.9, ID (38.97) 31.7, WV (47.23) 27.9, AZ (49.60) 48.1, UT (59.69) 37.7, NV (178.05) 51.3, AK (745.43) 41.6,
Avg. for bottom eleven

S. And, finally, here's a combined ranking of the states from least patriotic and All-American, to most patriotic and All-American, according to these three articles: one, two, and three.

DC (NA) 90.9,
RI (12) 58.3, CA (17) 66.1, CT (18) 57.2, UT (28) 37.7, NJ (29) 57.3, NV (36) 51.3, OR (45) 56.2, MA (47) 64.5, MN (47) 50.8, NY (49) 61.3,
Avg. for the top ten

MI (49) 49.9, HI (53) 67.5, NM (57) 54.7, AZ (58) 48.1, ND (58) 30.2, VT (62) 65.2, IL (67) 59.0, IN (69) 40.0, LA (70) 39.8, NE (70) 36.4,
Avg. for the second ten

KS (71) 38.8, PA (72) 49.6, TX (73) 45.2, AR (75) 35.8, MD (77) 63.8,

ID (79) 31.7, NH (80) 50.2, DE (81) 56.0, TN (83) 36.4, WA (86) 58.8,
Avg, for the third ten

WI (87) 49.6, FL (88) 49.4, MS (91) 40.8, IA (92) 44.9, KY (93) 34.3, WV (94) 27.9, CO (100) 52.7, ME (101) 51.5, AK (102) 41.6, MO (105) 39.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OH (108) 45.8, VA (110) 52.9, NC (110) 48.1, OK (110) 30.7, WY (110) 24.3, MT (113) 38.9, SD (114) 34.0, GA (115) 47.4, AL (132) 35.6, SC (133) 42.6, 
Avg. for bottom eleven
  
Now, that's not really much of a surprise. Eleven of twelve of the "most" patriotic states voted for Trump, and nine of the ten "least" patriotic voted for Clinton.

T. And here, is a list of the states in order by the percentage of mobile homes within the state. (It is based on this list, which unfortunately appears to be based upon information from 2004.)

DC (0.0) 90.9, HI (0.2) 67.5, NJ (0.9) 57.3, RI (1.0) 58.3, MA (1.0) 64.5, CT (1.2) 57.2,
MD (2.0) 63.8, NY (2.6) 61.3, IL (2.8) 59.0, MN (3.9) 50.8,
Avg. for the top ten

UT (4.2) 37.7, IA (4.2) 44.9, OH (4.4) 45.8, CA (4.4) 66.1, NE (4.5) 36.4, PA (4.5) 49.6, CO (4.9) 52.7, KS (5.2) 38.8, MI (6.0) 49.9, WI (6.0) 49.6,
Avg. for the second ten

VA (6.1) 52.9, IN (6.5) 40.0, NH (6.5) 50.2, AK (6.9) 41.6, VT (7.2) 65.2, 

MO (7.3) 39.9, WA (7.5) 58.8, NV (7.9) 51.3, TX (8.0) 45.2, ND (8.5) 30.2,
Avg, for the third ten

ME (8.9) 51.5, OK (9.5) 30.7, TN (9.9) 36.4, OR (9.9) 56.2, FL (10.4) 49.4, ID (10.9) 31.7, GA (11.0) 47.4, DE (11.7) 56.0, LA (11.7) 39.8, SD (12.1) 34.0, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

AR (12.8) 35.8, MT (12.8) 38.9, AZ (13.3) 48.1, MS (13.8) 40.8, KY (13.9) 34.3, WY (14.5) 24.3, AL (14.7) 35.6, WV (16.0) 27.9, NM (16.6) 54.7, NC (16.8) 48.1, SC (18.8) 42.6, 
Avg. for bottom eleven


U. And here is a list of states in reverse order of cattle per capita, based on this list.

DC (0.0) 90.9, NJ (0.0) 57.3, RI (0.0) 58.3, MA (0.01) 64.5, CT (0.01) 57.2, AK (0.01) 41.6, DE (0.02) 56.0, NH (0.02) 50.2, MD (0.03) 63.8, ME (0.06) 51.5,
Avg. for the top ten

NY (0.07) 61.3,
SC (0.08) 42.6, NC (0.08) 48.1, FL (0.08) 49.4, IL (0.09) 59.0, HI (0.09) 67.5, GA (0.10) 47.4, OH (0.11) 45.8, MI (0.11) 49.9, PA (0.13) 49.6,
Avg. for the second ten

IN (0.13) 40.0, CA (0.14) 66.1, AZ (0.14) 48.1, WA (0.16) 58.8, NV (0.16) 51.3,

LA (0.17) 39.8, VA (0.19) 52.9, WV (0.20) 27.9, AL (0.26) 35.6, TN (0.27) 36.4,
Avg, for the third ten

UT (0.28) 37.7, MS (0.31) 40.8, OR (0.33) 56.2, TX (0.41) 45.2, VT (0.41) 65.2, MN (0.42) 50.8, CO (0.47) 52.7, KY (0.48) 34.3, AR (0.56) 35.8, WI (0.58) 49.6, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

NM (0.62) 54.7, MO (0.63) 39.9, OK (1.12) 30.7, IA (1.20) 44.9, ID (1.36) 31.7, KS (2.0) 38.8, WY (2.18) 24.3, ND (2.45) 30.2, MT (2.51) 38.9, NE (3.29) 36.4, SD (4.32) 34.0, 
Avg. for bottom eleven


v. And here, my friends, is energy consumption per capita, in million Btu, according to this list.

NY (190) 61.3, RI (194) 58.3, CA (196) 66.1, HI (198) 67.5, FL (207) 49.4, CT (209) 57.2, AZ (211) 48.1, MA (213) 64.5, VT (223) 65.2, NV (233) 51.3,
Avg. for the top ten

MD (234) 63.8, NH (234) 50.2, OR (249) 56.2, NC (257) 48.1, NJ (262) 57.3, UT (271) 37.7, DC (271) 90.9, CO (276) 52.7, GA (282) 47.4, WA (285) 58.8,
Avg. for the second ten

MI (291) 49.9, VA (292) 52.9, DE (293) 56.0, PA (305) 49.6, ME (309) 51.5,

MO (314) 39.9, IL (314) 59.0,  ID (318) 31.7, WI (324) 49.6, NM (326) 54.7, 
Avg, for the third ten

OH (329) 45.8, TN (335) 36.4, SC (338) 42.6, MN (350) 50.8, AR (376) 35.8, MS (386) 40.8, KS (390) 38.8, MT (394) 38.9, KY (401) 34.3, AL (404) 35.6,
Avg. for the fourth ten

WV (407) 27.9, OK (433) 30.7, IN (444) 40.0, SD (459) 34.0, NE (459) 36.4, TX (478) 45.2, IA (496) 44.9, AK (818) 41.6, ND (865) 30.2, WY (917) 24.3, LA (921) 39.8,
Avg. for bottom eleven

w. And finally, we have lawyers per capita per state, according to this list.

DC (774.9) 90.9, NY (87.2) 61.3, MA (64.7) 64.5, CT (52.0) 57.2, IL (49.2) 59.0, NJ (46.4) 57.3, MN (44.7) 50.8, CA (42.4) 66.1, MO (41.6) 39.9, LA (40.2) 39.8,
Avg. for the top ten

RI (40.0) 58.3, CO (39.9) 52.7, MD (39.8) 63.8, PA (38.3) 49.6, FL (36.6) 49.4, VT (36.3) 65.2, MI (35.0) 49.9, WA (34.6) 58.8, OK (34.4) 30.7, OH (33.5) 45.8,
Avg. for the second ten

AK (33.3) 41.6, TX (31.5) 45.2, DE (30.9) 56.0, OR (30.9) 56.2, GA (30.7) 47.4,

KY (30.4) 34.3, MT (30.3) 38.9, WY (30.3) 24.3, AL (30.1) 35.6, ME (29.7) 51.5,
Avg, for the third ten

HI (29.3) 67.5,
VA (28.7) 52.9, KS (28.4) 38.8, NE (28.3) 36.4, UT (28.1) 37.7, TN (27.2) 36.4, WI (26.8) 49.6, WV (26.7) 27.9, NM (26.6) 54.7, NH (26.5) 50.2, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

IA (24.1) 44.9, IN (24.0) 40.0, AZ (23.7) 48.1, NV (23.7) 51.3, MS (23.6) 40.8, NC (23.0) 48.1, ID (22.6) 31.7, SD (22.6) 34.0, ND (22.0) 30.2, SC (20.5) 42.6, AR (20.0) 35.8,
Avg. for bottom eleven


Dentists per 100,000 capita, according to this website

DC (89.9) 90.9, NJ (81.5) 57.3, AK (80.9) 41.6, MA (78.3) 64.5, CA (77.1) 66.1, CT (75.8) 57.2, HI (75.6) 67.5, NY (73.6) 61.3, WA (72.8) 58.8, MD (72.0) 63.8,

CO (69.7) 52.7,
OR (69.1) 56.2, IL (67.6) 59.0, NE (65.9) 36.4, NH (64.0) 50.2, VA (63.6) 52.9, UT (62.9) 37.7, MI (61.0) 49.9, PA (60.7) 49.6, MN (60.3) 50.8,

MT (59.9) 38.9, VT (56.7) 65.2, ID (56.7) 31.7, ND (55.4) 30.2, WI (55.3) 49.6,

KY (55.3) 34.3, RI (54.3) 58.3, WY (54.1) 24.3, AZ (53.9) 48.1,SD (53.6) 34.0,

IA (52.9) 44.9, NV (52.8) 51.3, OH (52.3) 45.8, FL (52.0) 49.4, TX (51.9) 45.2, KS (50.9) 38.8, NM (50.8) 54.7, ME (50.7) 51.5, OK (50.3) 30.7, NC (50.2) 48.1,

TN (49.6) 36.4, WV (48.6) 27.9, MO (48.4) 39.9, LA (48.4) 39.8, SC (48.0) 42.6, IN (47.7) 40.0, GA (47.0) 47.4, DE (45.6) 56.0, AL (43.8) 35.6, MS (42.9) 40.8, AR (40.9) 35.8,


x. Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists per 100,00 children, per this list.

DC (55.64) 90.9, MA (31.78) 64.5, CT (30.59) 57.2, RI (30.58) 58.3, VT (24.63) 65.2, NY (24.57) 61.3, MD (23.28) 63.8, HI (21.40) 67.5, ME (20.93) 51.5, NH (17.96) 50.2,
Avg. for the top ten

PA (15.63) 49.6, NJ (15.01) 57.3, CO (14.51) 52.7, NC (12.70) 48.1, VA (12.58) 52.9, OR (11.76) 56.2, NM (11.60) 54.7, CA (11.40) 66.1, SC (11.35) 42.6, WI (11.16) 49.6,
Avg. for the second ten

SD (10.91) 34.0, OH (10.89) 45.8, AK (10.71) 41.6, ND (10.15) 30.2, MI (10.03) 49.9,

DE (9.81) 56.0, MN (9.66) 50.8, MO (9.48) 39.9, IL (9.45) 59.0, KY (9.36) 34.3,
Avg, for the third ten

AZ (9.25) 48.1, FL (9.23) 49.4, WA (9.11) 58.8, NE (8.98) 36.4, KS (8.58) 38.8, TX (8.25) 45.2, AL (8.12) 35.6, MT (8.01) 38.9, WV (7.83) 27.9, LA (7.71) 39.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

AR (7.65) 35.8, TN (7.51) 36.4, GA (7.43) 47.4, IA (7.30) 44.9, NV (6.79) 51.3, OK (6.30) 30.7, UT (6.18) 37.7, MS (5.46) 40.8, IN (5.30) 40.0, ID (5.10) 31.7, WY (4.36) 24.3,
Avg. for bottom eleven

y. Male/female wage gap
, according to this list.

NY (.89) 61.3, DE (.89) 56.0, FL (.87) 49.4, DC (.86) 90.9, NC (.86) 48.1, RI (.86) 58.3, CA (.86) 66.1, NM (.85) 54.7, HI (.84) 67.5, VT (.84) 65.2,
Avg. for the top ten

NV (.84) 51.3,
MD (.84) 63.8,
AZ (.83) 48.1, MA (.82) 64.5, CT (.82) 57.2, KY (.82) 34.3, NJ (.82) 57.3, MN (.81) 50.8, TN (.81) 36.4, SC (.81) 42.6,  
Avg. for the second ten

OR (.81) 56.2,
CO (.81) 52.7,
GA (.81) 47.4, IL (.79) 59.0, WA (.79) 58.8,

TX (.79) 45.2, PA (.79) 49.6, AR (.79) 35.8, NE (.79) 36.4, ME (.78) 51.5,  
Avg. for the third ten

WI (.78) 49.6, SD (.78) 34.0, AK (.78) 41.6, MO (.78) 39.9, VA (.78) 52.9, IA (.77) 44.9, KS (.77) 38.8, NH (.76) 50.2, AL (.76) 35.6, IN (.76) 40.0, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

MS (.76) 40.8, OH (.75) 45.8, MI (.74) 49.9, ID (.74) 31.7, OK (.73) 30.7, MT (.73) 38.9, ND (.71) 30.2, UT (.71) 37.7, WV (.71) 27.9, LA (.68) 39.8, WY (.64) 24.3, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Mean annual income for restaurant hosts/hostesses, as per this map.


NV (26,280) 51.3, VT (25,940) 65.2, MA (25,020) 64.5, HI (24,900) 67.5, NY (24,870) 61.3, CA (24,350) 66.1, WA (24,150) 58.8, NJ (23,620) 57.3, AK (23,330) 41.6, MN (22,870) 50.8,

CT (22,790) 57.2,
RI (22,570) 58.3, OR (22,160) 56.2, WY (21,790) 24.3, FL (21,690) 49.4, CO (21,620) 52.7, IL (21,560) 59.0, MD (21,380) 63.8, SD (20,940) 34.0, UT (20,610) 37.7,

NH (20,600) 50.2,
PA (20,530) 49.6, AZ (20,520) 48.1, NE (20,440) 36.4, VA (20,350) 52.9,

NM (20,340) 54.7,
TX (20,240) 45.2, ND (20,150) 30.2, OK (20,100) 30.7, MI (19,890) 49.9,

ME (19,860) 51.5,
MT (19,810) 38.9, OH (19,790) 45.8, MO (19,580) 39.9, WV (19,580) 27.9, SC (19,410) 42.6, MS (19,370) 40.8, DE (19,330) 56.0, NC (19,300) 48.1, ID (19,270) 31.7,  

AR (19,170) 35.8, KS (18,930) 38.8, TN (18,880) 36.4, WI (18,860) 49.6, IN (18,840) 40.0, IA (18,690) 44.9, LA (18,600) 39.8, GA (18,470) 47.4, KY (18,260) 34.3, AL (18,190) 35.6,



And this list presents the male-female ratio in STEM occupations, by state.


1-10: MD (2.1) 63.8, MA (2.5) 64.5, MT (2.5) 38.9, RI (2.6) 58.3, DE (2.6) 56.0, NY (2.6) 61.3, VA (2.6) 52.9, NC (2.6) 48.1, VT (2.7) 65.2, MN (2.7) 50.8,

11-20: MO (2.7) 39.9, PA (2.8) 49.6, NJ (2.8) 57.3, ME (2.8) 51.5, AR (2.8) 35.8, CT (2.8) 57.2, GA (2.8) 47.4, SD (2.8) 34.0, CA (2.9) 66.1, MS (2.9) 40.8, 

21-25:  ND (2.9) 30.2, TN (2.9) 36.4, IA (2.9) 44.9, NV (2.9) 51.3, SC (3.0) 42.6,

26-30: IL (3.0) 59.0, CO (3.0) 52.7, WI (3.0) 49.6, FL (3.0) 49.4, AK (3.0) 41.6,

31-40: NM (3.1) 54.7, NE (3.1) 36.4, OR (3.1) 56.2, OH (3.1) 45.8, HI (3.1) 67.5, AL (3.1) 35.6, KS (3.2) 38.8, KY (3.2) 34.3, AZ (3.3) 48.1,
WA (3.3) 58.8,

41-50: WV (3.3) 27.9, LA (3.3) 39.8, IN (3.3) 40.0, TX (3.3) 45.2, WY (3.4) 24.3, MI (3.4) 49.9, OK (3.4) 30.7, NH (3.7) 50.2, ID (4.0) 31.7, UT (4.5) 37.7,

8 of the 10, and 11 of the 16, states with the smallest ratio of men to women in STEM occupations (science, tech, engineering, and mathematics) voted for Clinton, while 13 of the 15 states with the largest ratio of men to women in STEM occupations voted for Trump.



Z. And, finally, let's look again at a list of the states by population density, reflecting inhabitants per square mile, alongside how each state voted for Clinton against Trump.

DC (10,298) 90.9, NJ (1189) 57.3, RI (1006) 58.3, MA (852) 64.5, CT (741) 57.2, MD (606) 63.8, DE (471) 56.0, NY (415) 61.3, FL (360) 49.4, PA (285) 49.6,
Avg. for the top ten 60.8%

OH (283) 45.8, CA (244) 66.1, IL (232) 59.0, HI (217) 67.5, VA (207) 52.9, NC (201) 48.1,
IN (183) 40.0, MI (175) 49.9, GA (165) 47.4, SC (157) 42.6,
Avg. for the second ten 51.9%

TN (157) 36.4, KY (110) 34.3, NH (147) 50.2, WI (105) 49.6, LA (105) 39.8,

Now, this starts out with a bang. Clinton won the eight most crowded states, and twelve of the top fifteen most crowded states.

WA (103) 58.8,
TX (98) 45.2, AL (95) 35.6, MO (87) 39.9, WV (77) 27.9,
Avg. for the third ten 41.8%

VT (68) 65.2,
MN (67) 50.8, MS (64) 40.8, AZ (57) 48.1, AR (56) 35.8, OK (55) 30.7, IA (55) 44.9, CO (49) 52.7, ME (43) 51.5, OR (40) 56.2,
Avg. for the fourth ten 47.7%


KS (35) 38.8, UT (34) 37.7, NV (25) 51.3, NE (24) 36.4, ID (20) 31.7, NM (17) 54.7, SD (11) 34.0, ND (10) 30.2, MT (7) 38.9, WY (6) 24.3, AK (1) 41.6,
Avg. for the bottom eleven 38.1%


Total of Rankings A - Z (Lifestyle)

So now let's add up the 24 previous lists, in which the states were sorted on the basis of pot-smoking teenagers, painkiller prescriptions, pick-up truck ownership, gun ownership, preference of beer over wine, preference of dogs over cats, addiction to cigarettes, obesity, the likelihood of a teenage pregnancy being terminated, the prevalence of STD's, the median age at first marriage, the number of children per mother, the number of divorced residents, the wage gap between men and women, the percentage of LGBT adults, the amount of toxic waste disposed in the state per capita, and the outward appearance of patriotism, to see how they line up with the election results. The total rankings on these lists are added up below, followed by the percentage at which they voted for Clinton against Trump.

MA (172) 64.5, NY (208.5) 61.3, DC (210, 2 NA) 90.9, CT (239.5) 57.2, CA (257.5) 66.1, RI (258) 58.3, NJ (274) 57.3, HI (314.5) 67.5, MD (335) 63.8, VT (358) 65.2,
Avg. for the top ten

NH (390.5) 50.2, FL (477.5) 49.4, IL (480.5) 59.0, DE (502) 56.0, WA (503.5) 58.8, OR (523.5) 56.2, MN (546) 50.8, PA (552.5) 49.6, ME (565) 51.5, CO (583) 52.7, 
Avg. for the second ten

VA (592.5) 52.9, WI (649) 49.6, MI (658.5) 49.9, AZ (676) 48.1, NV (698.5) 51.3, 

NC (718) 48.1, OH (731.5) 45.8, GA (789.5) 47.4, MO (801.5) 39.9, IN (809.5) 40.0,
Avg. for the third ten
 
NM (815.5) 54.7, SC (840) 42.6, TX (844.5) 45.2, UT (849.5) 37.7, AK (859.5) 41.6, NE (865) 36.4, IA (881.5) 44.9, KS (888) 38.8, ID (906.5) 31.7, TN (913.5) 36.4, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

MT (922.5) 38.9, KY (930) 34.3, ND (943.5) 30.2, LA (952) 39.8, SD (962.5) 34.0, WV (965.5) 27.9, WY (972.5) 24.3, AL (1001.5) 35.6, OK (1040) 30.7, AR (1060.5) 35.8, MS (1072.5) 40.8,
Avg. for the bottom eleven


ADD IN OTHER 6

MA (172 + 155 = 327) 64.5, NY (208.5 + 150 = 350.5) 61.3, CA (257.5 + 124 = 381.5) 66.1, NJ (274 + 140 = 414) 57.3, RI (258 + 158 = 416) 58.3, CT (239.5 + 189 = 428.5) 57.2, DC (210 + 204 = 414, 2 NA) 90.9, VT (358 + 121 = 479) 65.2, HI (314.5 + 173 = 487.5) 67.5, MD (335 + 153 = 488) 63.8,
Avg. for the top ten

NH (390.5 + 140 = 530.5) 50.2, MN 546 + 78 = 624) 50.8, WA (503.5 + 123 = 626.5) 58.8, FL (477.5 + 156 = 633.5) 49.4, IL (480.5 + 174 = 654.5) 59.0, OR (523.5 + 140 = 663.5) 56.2, DE (502 + 200 = 702) 56.0, ME (565 + 149 = 714) 51.5, CO (583 = 145 = 728) 52.7, PA (552.5 + 194 = 746.5) 49.6,
Avg. for the second ten

VA (592.5 + 186 = 778.5) 52.9, MI (658.5 + 144 = 792.5) 49.9, WI (649 + 158 = 807) 49.6, AZ (676 + 155 = 821) 48.1, NC (718 + 147 = 865) 48.1,

NV (698.5 + 168 = 866.5) 51.3, OH (731.5 + 194 = 925.5) 45.8, GA (789.5 + 163 = 952.5) 47.4, UT (849.5 + 106 = 955.5) 37.7, IN (809.5 + 147 = 956.5) 40.0,
Avg. for the third ten
 
NE (865 + 104 = 969) 36.4, NM (815.5 + 157 = 972.5) 54.7, MO (801.5 + 178 = 979.5) 39.9, KS (888 + 113 = 1001) 38.8, AK (859.5 + 146 = 1005.5) 41.6,  IA (881.5 + 129 = 1010.5) 44.9, ID (906.5 + 109 = 1015.5) 31.7, SC (840 + 198 = 1038) 42.6, TX (844.5 + 204 = 1048.5) 45.2, TN (913.5 + 136 = 1049.5) 36.4, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

ND (943.5 + 129 = 1072.5) 30.2, SD (962.5 + 121 = 1083.5) 34.0, MT (922.5 + 166 = 1088.5) 38.9, WV (965.5 + 146 = 1111.5) 27.9, WY (972.5 + 154 = 1126.5) 24.3, KY (930 + 198 = 1128) 34.3, AL (1001.5 + 166 = 1167.5) 35.6, LA (952 + 242 = 1194) 39.8, OK (1040 + 167 = 1207) 30.7, AR (1060.5 + 152 = 1212.5) 35.8, MS (1072.5 + 205 = 1277.5) 40.8,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

So, there it is. The cultural divide. 19 of the 21 least painkiller-popping, least pick-up truck owning, least gun-owning, least beer-loving, least cigarette smoking, least dog-loving, least obese, most likely to abort a teenage pregnancy, least infected with an STD, least likely to marry young, least fertile, least divorced, least polluting, and least patriotic states (and District) voted for Clinton, while 25 of the 26 states at the bottom of the list voted for Trump.

But there's got to be more to it, right? Maybe. I looked at unemployment rates, poverty rates, crime rates, and economic success, etc, but none of these factors were as clear an indicator of the states voting for Trump as obesity, beer-drinking, gun ownership and pick-up truck ownership. Trump nailed it with his slogan. Make America Great Again. His supporters believed their best days were behind them, not just economically, but physically. Perhaps, then, this wasn't an election over issues, or even over character, as much as it was about the future and fear of the future. A large sector of the country saw an invasion of immigrants coming into the country, and was scared by it. They saw a a rainbow coalition in the President's cabinet, and among the Democratic leaders. And were scared by it. They own guns, and they eat too much, and they drink a lot of beer in comparison to wine. And they resent being told they're wrong for wishing everything could just go back to how it used to be.

Or is that too insulting? Too simple?

Finding #11: at the heart of the culture war are conflicting ideologies, whose proponents are no longer content to sit side by side with each other.

The Election And the Bubble

So let's look at how people think, and see if that has anything to do with the election.

A. First. let's look back at the list of those self-identifying as conservative. And then let's add in the plus/minus of conservatives from this map. NO DC

DC (NA) 90.9,
VT (- 15.3 + -3 = -18.3  avg -9.15) 65.2,
MA (- 5.8 + -11 =-16.8 avg -8.4 ) 64.5, NY (0.6 + -4 =-3.4 avg -1.7) 61.3, CT (1.6 + -5 =-3.4 avg -1.7) 57.2, RI (- 0.9 + 0 = -0.9 avg 0.45) 58.3, NJ (3.3 + -2 = 1.3 avg 0.65) 57.3, CA (1.6 + 0 = 1.6 avg 0.8) 66.1, OR (2.7 + -1 = 1.7 avg 0.85) 56.2, MD (4.5 + 0 = 4.5 avg 2.25) 63.8, HI (- 1.3 + 6 = 4.7 avg 2.35) 67.5,
Avg. for the top ten  range

WA (3.4 + 3 = 6.4 avg 3.2) 58.8, IL (5.1 + 2 = 7.1 avg 3.55) 59.0, CO (8.1 + 5 = 13.1 avg 6.55) 52.7, NH (12.0 + 2 = 14 avg 7.0) 50.2, NM (6.9 + 9 = 15.9 avg 7.95) 54.7, DE (9.3 + 7 = 16.3 avg 8.15) 56.0, NV (9.9 + 8 = 17.9 avg 8.95) 51.3, MN (10.9 + 8 = 18.9 avg 9.45) 50.8, ME (11.2 + 8 = 19.2 avg 9.6) 51.5, MI (11.6 + 10 = 21.6 avg 10.8) 49.9,
Avg. for the second ten range

PA (12.3 + 10 = 22.3 avg 11.15) 49.6, FL (14.0 + 11 = 25 avg 12.5) 49.4, VA (13.4 + 12 = 25.4 avg 12.7) 52.9, OH (16.3 + 10 = 26.3 avg 13.15) 45.8, WI (14.9 + 12 = 26.9 avg 13.45) 49.6,  

AZ (12.8 + 16 = 28.8 avg 14.4) 48.1, IA (17.3 + 13 = 30.3 avg 15.15) 44.9, IN (20.7 + 10 = 30.7 avg 15.35) 40.0, KS (17.7 + 14 = 31.7 avg 15.85) 38.8, NC (19.5 + 14 = 33.5 avg 16.75) 48.1,
Avg. for the third ten range

GA (21.0 + 14 = 34 avg 17.0) 47.4, AK (19.3 + 16 = 35.3 avg 17.65) 41.6, NE (18.6 + 18 = 36.6 avg 18.3) 36.4, TX (19.8 + 17 = 36.8 avg 18.4) 45.2, MO (20.0 + 17 = 37 avg 18.5) 39.9, KY (24.3 + 14 = 38.3 avg 19.15) 34.3, ND (27.8 + 14 = 41.8 avg 20.9) 30.2, WV (23.3 + 20 = 43.3 avg 21.65) 27.9, OK (26.3 + 19 = 45.3 avg 22.65) 30.7, SC (25.1 + 21 = 46.1 avg 23.05) 42.6,
Avg. for the fourth ten range

MT (23.2 + 23 = 46.2 avg 23.1) 38.9, SD (25.3 + 21 = 46.3 avg 23.15) 34.0, TN (24.4 + 22 = 46.4 avg 23.2) 36.4, ID (31.8 + 20 = 51.8 avg 25.9) 31.7, LA (26.9 + 26 = 52.9 avg 26.45) 39.8, UT (27.7 + 26 = 53.7 avg 26.85) 37.7, AR (30.0 + 25 = 55.0 avg 27.5) 35.8, MS (27.6 + 29 = 56.6 avg 28.3) 40.8, WY (27.6 + 29 = 56.6 avg 28.3) 24.3, AL (31.9 + 28 = 59.9 avg 29.95) 35.6, 
Avg. for the bottom eleven range

(List in order of first number)

DC (NA) 90.9 VT (- 15.3 + -3 = -18.3  avg -9.15) 65.2, MA (- 5.8 + -11 =-16.8 avg -8.4 ) 64.5, HI (- 1.3 + 6 = 4.7 avg 2.35 ) 67.5, RI (- 0.9 + 0 = -0.9 avg 0.45) 58.3, NY (0.6 + -4 =-3.4 avg -1.7) 61.3, CA (1.6 + 0 = 1.6 avg 0.8) 66.1, CT (1.6 + -5 =-3.4 avg -1.7) 57.2, OR (2.7 + -1 = 1.7 avg 0.85) 56.2, NJ (3.3 + -2 = 1.3 avg 0.65) 57.3,
Avg. for the top ten  range

WA (3.4 + 3 = 6.4 avg 3.2) 58.8, MD (4.5 + 0 = 4.5 avg 2.25) 63.8, IL (5.1 + 2 = 7.1 avg 3.55) 59.0, NM (6.9 + 9 = 15.9 avg 7.95) 54.7, CO (8.1 + 5 = 13.1 avg 6.55) 52.7, DE (9.3 + 7 = 16.3 avg 8.15) 56.0, NV (9.9 + 8 = 17.9 avg 8.95) 51.3, MN (10.9 + 8 = 18.9 avg 9.45) 50.8, ME (11.2 + 8 = 19.2 avg 9.6) 51.5, MI (11.6 + 10 =21.6 avg 10.8) 49.9,
Avg. for the second ten range

NH (12.0 + 2 = 14 avg 7) 50.2, PA (12.3 + 10 = 22.3 avg 11.15) 49.6, AZ (12.8 + 16 = 28.8 avg 14.4) 48.1, VA (13.4 + 12 = 25.4 avg 12.7) 52.9, FL (14.0 + 11 = 25 avg 12.5) 49.4, 

WI (14.9 + 12 = 26.9 avg 13.45) 49.6, OH (16.3 + 10 = 26.3 avg 13.15) 45.8, IA (17.3 + 13 = 30.3 avg 15.15) 44.9, KS (17.7 + 14 = 31.7 avg 15.85) 38.8, NE (18.6 + 18 = 36.6 avg 18.3) 36.4,
Avg. for the third ten range

AK (19.3 + 16 = 35.3 avg 17.65) 41.6, NC (19.5 + 14 = 33.5 avg 16.75) 48.1, TX (19.8 + 17 = 36.8 avg 18.4) 45.2, MO (20.0 + 17 = 36 avg 18.5) 39.9, IN (20.7 + 10 = 30.7 avg 15.35) 40.0, GA (21.0 + 14 = 34 avg 17.0) 47.4, MT (23.2 + 23 = 46.2 avg 23.1) 38.9, WV (23.3 + 20 = 43.3 avg 21.65) 27.9, KY (24.3 + 14 = 38.3 avg 19.15) 34.3, TN (24.4 + 22 = 46.4 avg 23.2) 36.4,
Avg. for the fourth ten range

SC (25.1 + 21 = 46.1 avg 23.05) 42.6, SD (25.3 + 21 = 46.3 avg 23.15) 34.0, OK (26.3 + 19 = 45.3 avg 22.65) 30.7, LA (26.9 + 26 = 52.9 avg 26.45) 39.8, MS (27.6 + 29 = 56.6 avg 28.3) 40.8, WY (27.6 + 29 = 56.6 avg 28.3) 24.3, UT (27.7 + 26 = 53.7 avg 26.85) 37.7, ND (27.8 + 14 = 41.8 avg 20.9) 30.2, AR (30.0 + 25 = 55.0 avg 27.5) 35.8, ID (31.8 + 20 = 51.8 avg 25.9) 31.7, AL (31.9 + 28 = 59.9 avg 29.95) 35.6,

B. But...what's a conservative? Is it someone who believes in "limited government", as evidenced by a lack of regulations? Here are the states ranked by "freedom" (from regulation), from the least "free" to the most "free", based upon the amount of statewide regulations, according to this article on the Cato Institute website.
 
DC (NA) 90.9, NY 61.3, CA 66.1, HI 67.5, NJ 57.3, MD 63.8, CT 57.2, IL 59.0, RI 58.3, ME 51.5, 
Avg. for the top ten

KY 34.3, VT 65.2, WV 27.9, OR 56.2, MN 50.8, MS 40.8, OH 45.8, LA 39.8, MA 64.5, WA 58.8,
Avg. for the second ten

DE 56.0, NM 54.7, AR 35.8, TX 45.2, WI 49.6,

PA 49.6, NE 36.4, MI 49.9, AL 35.6, GA 47.4,
Avg, for the third ten

VA 52.9, UT 37.7, NC 48.1, MO 39.9, MT 38.9, KS 38.8, SC 42.6, AZ 48.1, WY 24.3, ND 30.2, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

NV 51.3, CO 52.7, IA 44.9, FL 49.4, ID 31.7, TN 36.4, AK 41.6, SD 34.0, IN 40.0, OK 30.7, NH 50.2,
Avg. for bottom eleven

Well, that doesn't work. What about NV, CO and NH?

C. So what's "conservative" mean, then? Does it mean religious? Since the trend going back decades has been that the Christian right votes Republican, I decided to compare a list of the percentage of adults in each state claiming they are "highly religious" or "very religious" to the election results. (This list and this list were consulted in the creation of this list.) I then decided to add in the pct. of those saying they were "absolutely certain" in their belief in God, minus the pct. of those saying they don't believe in God, from this list. This new list follows, from the state with the lowest percentage of "highly religious" and 'very religious" citizens to the state with the highest percentage.

VT (34 + 22 + 20 = 76) 65.2, NH (33 + 24 + 25 = 82) 50.2, MA (33 + 28 + 22 = 83) 64.5, ME (34 + 27 + 32 = 93) 51.5, CT (43 + 32  + 42 = 117) 57.2, WA (45 + 32 + 45 = 122) 58.8,  OR (48 + 31 + 44 = 123) 56.2, CA (49 + 34 + 42 = 125) 66.1, DC (53 + 32 + 41 = 126) 90.9, NY (46 + 34 + 46 = 126) 61.3, 
Avg. for the top ten 

CO (47 + 35 + 45 = 127) 52.7, NV (49 + 32 + 47 = 128) 51.3, WI (45 + 38 + 46 = 129) 49.6, AK (45 + 38 + 46 = 129) 41.6, HI (47 + 32 + 53 = 132) 67.5, RI (49 + 34 + 49 = 132) 58.3, MN (49 + 42 + 47 = 138) 50.8,  IL (51 + 39 + 50 = 142) 59.0, DE (52 + 36 + 54 = 142) 56.0, MT (48 + 38 + 56 = 142) 38.9,

Avg. for the second ten

NJ (55 + 36 + 52 = 143) 57.3, PA (53 + 41 + 51 = 145) 49.6, MD (54 + 39 + 54 = 147) 63.8, AZ (53 + 42 + 52 = 147) 48.1, MI (53 + 41 + 54 = 148) 49.9,

Well, we're off to a good start. The twelve least, and nineteen of the twenty-three least, religious states voted for Clinton. And three of the six least religious states voting for Trump were within one point of voting for Clinton.

ID (51 + 47 + 51 = 149) 31.7, NM (57 + 41 + 52 = 150) 54.7, FL (54 + 42 + 54 = 150) 49.4, WY (54 + 36 + 60 = 150) 24.3, IN (54 + 46 + 53 = 153) 40.0,
Avg. for the third ten

IA (55 + 43 + 57 = 155) 44.9, NE (54 + 47 + 57 = 158) 36.4, OH (58 + 41 + 60 = 159) 45.8, KS (55 + 47 + 59 = 161) 38.8, VA (61 + 44 + 57 = 162) 52.9, ND (53 + 46 + 64 = 163) 30.2, MO (60 + 44 + 62 = 166) 39.9, SD (59 + 46 + 62 = 167) 34.0, TX (64 + 48 + 63 = 175) 45.2, UT (64 + 60 + 53 = 177) 37.7,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OK (66 + 49 + 65 = 180) 30.7, NC (65 + 50 + 66 = 181) 48.1, KY (65 + 49 + 67 = 181) 34.3, WV (69 + 42 + 72 = 183) 27.9, GA (66 + 52 + 68 = 186) 47.4, SC (70 + 54 + 69 = 193) 42.6, AR (70 + 51 + 73 = 194) 35.8, LA (71 + 56 + 69 = 196) 39.8, TN (73 + 54 + 75 = 202) 36.4, AL (77 + 57 + 80 = 214) 35.6, MS (77 + 61 + 78 = 216) 40.8,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

And the sixteen most religious states voted for Trump. So religion would seem to have been a key factor.

This was supported by exit polling which showed that those responding "none" when asked their religion voted for Clinton by a margin of 67-25.

D. But what matters more is if and how one's religiosity affects how one thinks. This study reflects the "Belief in absolute standards for right and wrong among adults" by state. By deducting the percentage of those believing "there are clear standards for what is right and wrong" from the percentage of those believing "Right or wrong depends on the situation" one can approximate the level of zealotry within the state. When one looks at the "Sources of guidance on right and wrong among adults", moreover, one can deduct those most seeking guidance from their religion from those most seeking guidance from a philosophy or from science, and approximate the level of religiosity. One can then add the numbers for zealotry and religiosity together and approximate the level of "Free-thinking" within each state. (In most of the states the reliance on religion was greater than the reliance on reason or science; as a result, most of the second numbers are subtracted rather than added.) Here are the results, from most open-minded to least open-minded. 

MA (48 + 13 = 61) 64.5, DC (53 + 0 = 53) 90.9, VT (42 + 10 = 52) 65.2, HI (44 + 0 = 44) 67.5, NY (46 - 2 = 44) 61.3, CT (37 + 6 = 43) 57.2, NH (34 + 9 = 43) 50.2, NJ (42 - 6 = 36) 57.3, ME (41 - 5 = 36) 51.5, CA (39 - 4 = 35) 66.1,
Avg. for the top ten

NV (38 - 5 = 33) 51.3,
IL (38 - 6 = 32) 59.0, MN (35 - 5 = 30) 50.8, WA (31 - 3 = 28) 58.8, WI (38 - 12 = 26) 49.6, MD (38 - 13 = 25) 63.8, DE (38 - 14 = 24) 56.0, RI (28 - 6 = 22) 58.3, OR (28 - 6 = 22) 56.2, FL (34 - 12 = 22) 49.4,
Avg. for the second ten

OH (34 - 16 = 18) 45.8, AK (26 - 8 = 18) 41.6, CO (22 - 5 = 17) 52.7, IA (35 - 19 = 16) 44.9, ND (25 - 14 = 11) 30.2,

OK (33 - 20 = 13) 30.7, MI (26 - 16 = 10) 49.9, IN (28 - 19 = 9) 40.0, NM (26 - 20 = 6) 54.7, VA (25 - 19 = 6) 52.9,
Avg. for the third ten

PA (21 - 15 = 6) 49.6, AZ (19 - 13 = 6) 48.1, MO (26 - 20 = 6) 39.9, MT (14 - 8 = 6) 38.9, TX (28 - 23 = 5) 45.2, NE (21 - 16 = 5) 36.4, SD (21 - 16 = 5) 34.0, KS (26 - 22 = 4) 38.8, NC (26 - 24 = 2) 48.1, ID (15 - 18 = -3) 31.7,
Avg. for the fourth ten

KY (22 - 26 = -4) 34.3, WY (14 - 19 = -5) 24.3, GA (22 - 29 = -7) 47.4, UT (20 - 27 = -7) 37.7, LA (21 - 29  = -8) 39.8, SC (21 - 33 = -12) 42.6, MS (22 - 35 = -13) 40.8, AR (20 - 36 = -16) 35.8, TN (17 - 34 = -17) 36.4, AL (12 - 42 = -30) 35.6, WV (10 - 43 = -33) 27.9,
Avg. for the bottom eleven

Now, this isn't much of a surprise. The 14 most, and 18 of the 19 most, free-thinking states voted for Clinton, and the 21 least, and 29 of the 32 least, free-thinking states voted for Trump.

E. So, now let's use this last study to approximate each state's acceptance of the social contract. The results to two questions were added together. The first number reflects the pct. of respondents per state to claim government aid to the poor does more good than harm minus the pct. of respondents to claim it does more harm than good. The second number reflects the number of respondents believing the government should get bigger and offer more services minus the number who believe it should become smaller and cut services. (Most of the second numbers were negative. A subtraction of one thereby reflects that 1% more believed the government should become smaller than believed it should expand.)

DC (53 + 51 = 104) 90.9, NY (17 + 12 = 29) 61.3, VT (27 + 0 = 27) 65.2, CA (18 + 5 = 23) 66.1, NJ (16 + 5 = 21) 57.3, MA (17 - 1 = 16) 64.5, NM (10 + 5 = 15) 54.7, MD (14 - 3 = 11) 63.8, RI (17 - 6 = 11) 58.3, DE (8 - 3 = 5) 56.0,
Avg. for the top ten

CT (13 - 9 = 4) 57.2,
IL (10 - 8 = 2) 59.0, WA (16 - 15 = 1) 58.8, OR (17 - 16 = 1) 56.2, FL (3 - 2 = 1) 49.4, HI (7 - 8 = -1) 67.5, NC (6 - 9 = -3) 48.1, TX (-1 - 2 = -3) 45.2, CO (6 - 12 = -6) 52.7, GA (1 - 8 = -7) 47.4,
Avg. for the second ten

SC (8 - 15 = -7) 42.6, AK (2 - 14 = -12) 41.6, MI (6 - 19 = -13) 49.9, NV (5 - 19 = -14) 51.3, MN (9 - 23 = -14) 50.8,

IA (6 - 20 = -14) 44.9, AR (-1 - 14 = -15) 35.8, LA (-4 - 12  = -16) 39.8, ME (11 - 28 = -17) 51.5, NH (14 - 33 = -19) 50.2,
Avg. for the third ten

TN (0 - 21 = -21) 36.4, VA (-5 - 17 = -22) 52.9, MS (-8 - 14 = -22) 40.8, PA (-2 - 21 = -23) 49.6, OH (0 - 24 = -24) 45.8, KY (-8 - 16 = -24) 34.3, WV (0 - 26 = -26) 27.9, AZ (-6 - 21 = -27) 48.1, WI (-2 - 26 = -28) 49.6, MO (-1- 28 = -29) 39.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OK (-4 - 25 = -29) 30.7, AL (-13 - 18 = -31) 35.6, KS (-3 - 35 = -38) 38.8, IN (-18 - 21 = -39) 40.0, ID (-3 - 36 = -39) 31.7, UT (-8 - 40 = -48) 37.7, SD (-7 - 41 = -48) 34.0, MT (-13 - 39 = -52) 38.9, NE (-13 - 39 = -52) 36.4, ND (-16 - 40 = -56) 30.2, WY (-29 - 51 = -80) 24.3,    
Avg. for the bottom eleven

F. And now let's see if this wanting to help others among Clinton supporters extends to the environment. The following list (based upon this survey) reflects the percentage of respondents claiming the cost of environmental protections and regulations was worth the cost in jobs and income vs. those claiming they were not. It is presumed to reflect the level of acceptance of responsibility to the planet.

DC (48) 90.9, VT (43) 65.2, HI (42) 67.5, WA (38) 58.8, RI (37) 58.3, NH (35) 50.2, NY (34) 61.3, MA (32) 64.5, MD (32) 63.8, NJ (32) 57.3, 
Avg. for the top ten

CT (32) 57.2, ME (28) 51.5, DE (27) 56.0, CA (26) 66.1, MN (25) 50.8, IA (25) 44.9, IL (21) 59.0, GA (21) 47.4, CO (20) 52.7, VA (20) 52.9,
Avg. for the second ten

WI (20) 49.6, TX (20) 45.2, FL (19) 49.4, OR (18) 56.2, MI (17) 49.9,

NC (17) 48.1, NM (16) 54.7, PA (16) 49.6, AZ (14) 48.1, AK (13) 41.6,
Avg, for the third ten

NV (11) 51.3, OH (11) 45.8, KS (11) 38.8, NE (11) 36.4, OK (10) 30.7, SC (9) 42.6, UT (9) 37.7, ID (9) 31.7, IN (8) 40.0, MO (8) 39.9,
Avg. for the fourth ten

LA (8) 39.8, MS (4) 40.8, TN (4) 36.4, AR (2) 35.8, SD (2) 34.0, ND (1) 30.2, AL (-2) 35.6, KY (-3) 34.3, MT (-16) 38.9, WV (-17) 27.9, WY (-17) 24.3,
Avg. for bottom eleven

Wow, that's pretty convincing. The 15 states and districts most supportive of environmental regulations voted for Clinton. The 20 states least supportive of environmental regulations all voted for Trump.

G. Here, then are the percentage of respondents per state "feeling spiritual peace and well-being" once a week or more, plus half the percentage of those feeling it once or twice a month, minus the percentage of those experiencing "a sense of wonder about the universe" once a week or more, plus half the percentage of those feeling it once or twice a month. These numbers come from the Pew Survey on religion. And reveal the spiritual character of each state as to whether the spirituality of its citizens is inward-based vs outward based. Let's call this metric: self-centered-ness.
 
MA (54 - 53.5 = 0.5) 64.5, VT (55 - 54 = 1) 65.2, NH (51.5 - 50 = 1.5) 50.2, WA (62 - 57 = 5) 58.8, OR (64.5 - 59.5 = 5) 56.2, NY (60 - 54.5 = 5.5) 61.3, AZ (66 - 60 = 6) 48.1, NV (69.5 - 63 = 6.5) 51.3, CO (62 - 55 = 7) 52.7, CT (58 - 50 = 8) 57.2,
Avg. for the top ten


DC (61 - 53 = 8) 90.9, WY (63 - 55 = 8) 24.3, MT (63.5 - 55 = 8.5) 38.9, PA (63 - 53.5 = 9.5) 49.6, ME (57 - 47 = 10) 51.5, CA (64.5 - 54.5 = 10) 66.1, VA (67 - 56 = 11) 52.9, NM (68 - 57 = 11) 54.7, IL (63 - 51.5 = 11.5) 59.0, DE (59.5 - 47.5 = 12) 56.0,
Avg. for the second ten 

WI (60 - 48 = 12) 49.6, HI (66 - 53.5 = 12.5) 67.5, AK (67 - 54.5 = 12.5) 41.6, UT (73 - 60.5 = 12.5) 37.7, IA (61 - 48 = 13) 44.9,

IN (65 - 52 = 13) 40.0, MN (65 - 51.5 = 13.5) 50.8, OH (65 - 51.5 = 13.5) 45.8, MO (66.5 - 53 = 13.5) 39.9, TX (69.5 - 56 = 13.5) 45.2,
Avg, for the third ten

RI (63 - 49 = 14) 58.3,
MD (64 - 50 = 14) 63.8, ND (62.5 - 48 = 14.5) 30.2, MI (64 - 49.5 = 14.5) 49.9,  FL (68.5 - 53.5 = 15) 49.4, ID (69 - 54 = 15) 31.7, NJ (65.5 - 49 = 16.5) 57.3, NE (66.5 - 49 = 17.5) 36.4, KY (67 - 49.5 = 17.5) 34.3, KS (68 - 50.5 = 17.5) 38.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

SD (71 - 53.5 = 17.5) 34.0, AR (70 - 52 = 18) 35.8, OK (70 - 52 = 18) 30.7, NC (73 - 54 = 19) 48.1, GA (72 - 54 = 18) 47.4, SC (73 - 54 = 19) 42.6, WV (74.5 - 55 = 19.5) 27.9, TN (76 - 55.5 = 20.5) 36.4, LA (71.5 - 49 = 22.5) 39.8, MS (76 - 51.5 = 24.5) 40.8, AL (76.5 - 47.5 = 29) 35.6, 
Avg. for bottom eleven

Well, that's another goody. Sixteen of the twenty most non-centered states voted for Clinton, while the fourteen most, and twenty-six of the thirty-one most, self-centered states voted for Trump. That makes sense. There's another way to look at it, of course. The feeling of spiritual peace and well-being more prevalent among red states can be summed up in one word: comfort. Red state voters seek out comfort, and cherish comfort. While blue state voters seek out transcendence. Perhaps, then, the underlying emotional state--the state that guides the ship of state, so to speak--is fear, for the red states, and boredom, for the blue states. 

H. Let's get more specific. The problem with religion for Clinton is not so much that highly religious people think she's irreligious, as much as they resent her kind of religion, one that accepts science as almost or maybe even more than equal with religion when it comes to understanding the world. So let's look at the election through the lens of two hot-button issues, by adding together the percentage of each state accepting the theory of evolution with the percentage of each state accepting the theory of man-made global warming, and putting the states in order by their cumulative level of acceptance of science. (This list and this map were consulted in the creation of this list.)

ORIGINAL LIST
DC (52 + 81 = 133) 90.9, VT (65 + 68 = 133) 65.2, NY (60 + 72 = 132) 61.3, MA (62 + 69 = 131) 64.5, CT (64 + 66 = 130) 57.2, NJ (61 + 68 = 129) 57.3, HI (55 + 75 = 127) 67.5, CA (57 + 70 = 127) 66.1, RI (61 + 66 = 127) 58.3, ME (59 + 64 = 123) 51.5,
Avg. for the top ten 64.0%

WA (53 + 68 = 121) 58.8,
NH (60 + 61 = 121) 50.2, MD (52 + 68 = 120) 63.8,
AK (58 +62 = 120) 41.6, IL (52 + 67 = 119) 59.0, CO (52 + 66 = 118) 52.7, OR (50 + 67 = 117) 56.2, DE (52 + 65 = 117) 56.0, FL (51 + 64 = 115) 49.4, MN (49 + 63 = 112) 50.8,
Avg. for the second ten 53.8%

NM (46 + 66 = 112) 54.7,
VA (48 + 64 = 112) 52.9, NV (47 + 64 = 111) 51.3, AZ (48 + 62 = 110) 48.1, WI (48 + 61 = 109) 49.6

PA (46 + 62 = 108) 49.6, MI (45 + 61 = 106) 49.9, TX (42 + 63 = 105) 45.2, OH (45 + 59 = 104) 45.8, IA (44 + 60 = 104) 44.9,
Avg, for the third ten 49.2%

GA (40 + 63 = 103) 47.4, NE (44 + 58 = 102) 36.4, SC (42 + 59 = 101) 42.6, IN (43 + 58 = 101) 40.0, MT (41 + 60 = 101) 38.9, NC (38 + 62 = 100) 48.1, KS (42 + 58 = 100) 38.8, MO (38 + 60 = 98) 39.9, SD (39 + 59 = 98) 34.0, ID (38 + 58 = 96) 31.7,
Avg. for the fourth ten 39.8%

LA (38 + 57 = 95) 39.8, OK (36 + 57 = 93) 30.7, ND (35 + 58 = 93) 30.2, WY (38 + 55 = 93) 24.3,
MS (32 + 59 = 91) 40.8, UT (31 + 60 = 91) 37.7, KY (33 + 58 = 91) 34.3, WV (37 + 54 = 91) 27.9, AL (34 + 56 = 90) 35.6, TN (29 + 58 = 87) 36.4, AR (26 + 57 = 83) 35.8
Avg. for bottom eleven 34.0%

Well, heck, that's far and away the best metric so far. The ten states most accepting of accepted science voted for Clinton at almost twice the rate as the ten states least accepting of science, who voted overwhelmingly for Trump. That's a bad bad omen for the Democratic Party.

SEPARATE LISTS
I LATER ADDED A SECOND SURVEY REGARDING EVOLUTION INTO THE MIX. THE SECOND NUMBER SUPPORTING EVOLUTION ON THIS LIST REFLECTS THE PERCENTAGE OF RESPONDENTS WILLING TO ACKN0WLEDGE HUMANS HAVE EVOLVED OVER TIME. IN OTHER WORDS, THIS NUMBER REFLECTS THE PERCENTAGE OF RESPONDENTS WHO ARE NOT COMPLETELY IGNORANT )

VT (65)79 65.2, MA (62)77 64.5, CT (64)69 57.2, NH (60)70 50.2, ME (59)70 51.5, DC (52)76 90.9, RI (61)66 58.3, NJ (61)66 57.3, NY (60)66 61.3, CA (57)67 66.1,
Avg. for the top ten

HI (55)68 67.5, MD (52)70 63.8, WA (53)68 58.8, AK (58)63 41.6, IL (52)66 59.0, CO (52)66 52.7, OR (50)67 56.2, DE (52)63 56.0, FL (51)62 49.4, NV (47)65 51.3,
Avg. for the second ten

MN (49)62 50.8, WI (48)63 49.6, VA (48)61 52.9, AZ (48)61 48.1, IA (44)65 44.9, 

NM (46)62 54.7, NE (44)63 36.4, PA (46)60 49.6, MI (45)60 49.9, OH (45)59 45.8,
Avg, for the third ten

MT (41)63 38.9, IN (43)58 40.0, KS (42)58 38.8, WY (38)61 24.3, TX (42)56 45.2, ID (38)60 31.7, NC (38)59 48.1, GA (40)56 47.4, MO (38)58 39.9, LA (38)56 39.8,  
Avg. for the fourth ten

ND (35)59 30.2, SC (42)51 42.6, SD (39)53 34.0, OK (36)52 30.7, WV (37)48 27.9, KY (33)50 34.3, AL (34)47 35.6, UT (31)59 37.7, AR (26)51 35.8, MS (32)43 40.8, TN (29)43 36.4,
Avg. for bottom eleven

The centrality of this issue in the race was confirmed, moreover, by exit polling, which showed that white evangelicals or white born-again Christians voted for Trump by a margin of 80-16, and that Clinton won 60-34 when the race was restricted to those not afflicted in this manner.




MAN-MADE GLOBAL WARMING/CLIMATE CHANGE

DC (81) 90.9, HI (75) 67.5, NY (72) 61.3, CA (70) 66.1, MA (69) 64.5, VT (68) 65.2, MD (68) 63.8, WA (68) 58.8, NJ (68) 57.3, IL (67) 59.0,
Avg. for the top ten

OR (67) 56.2, RI (66) 58.3, CT (66) 57.2, NM (66) 54.7, CO (66) 52.7, DE (65) 56.0, VA (64) 52.9, ME (64) 51.5, NV (64) 51.3, FL (64) 49.4,
Avg. for the second ten %

MN (63) 50.8,
GA (63) 47.4, TX (63) 45.2, PA (62) 49.6, AZ (62) 48.1,

NC (62) 48.1, AK (62) 41.6, NH (61) 50.2, MI (61) 49.9, WI (61) 49.6
Avg, for the third ten

IA (60) 44.9, MO (60) 39.9, MT (60) 38.9, UT (60) 37.7, OH (59) 45.8, SC (59) 42.6, MS (59) 40.8,  SD (59) 34.0, IN (58) 40.0, KS (58) 38.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

NE (58) 36.4, TN (58) 36.4, KY (58) 34.3, ID (58) 31.7, ND (58) 30.2, LA (57) 39.8, AR (57) 35.8, OK (57) 30.7, AL (56) 35.6, WY (55) 24.3, WV (54) 27.9, 
Avg. for bottom eleven

Still, the thought occurred that I was showing some bias, and only picking issues which I knew ahead of time would reflect the divide between red states and blue states. So I decided to check these results against a list of states by the percentage of infants receiving the Dtap vaccination per state. 

JUST DTAP
(DC created by avg of VA and MD)
ME (93.1) 51.5, NH (91.3) 50.2, MA (89.8) 64.5, RI (88.8) 58.3, IL (87.8) 59.0, SD (87.8) 34.0, NM (87.5) 54.7, IA (87.4) 44.9, CA (87.3) 66.1, NE (87.3) 36.4,
Avg. for the top ten

VA (87.2) 52.9, MN (87.1) 50.8, PA (87.0) 49.6, NC (86.9) 48.1, DC (86.4 approx) FL (86.2) 49.4, VT (86.1) 65.2, CT (86.0) 57.2, GA (85.7) 47.4, MD (85.4) 63.8,
Avg. for the second ten


NY (85.4) 61.3, NJ (85.4) 57.3, DE (85.4) 56.0, CO (85.4) 52.7, KS (85.3) 38.8,

OH (85.1) 45.8, SC (85.1) 42.6, WI (84.4) 49.6, AL (84.1) 35.6, MS (83.3) 40.8, 
Avg, for the third ten

LA (83.3) 39.8, KY (83.2) 34.3, MT (83.1) 38.9, IN (82.8) 40.0, HI (82.4) 67.5, UT (81.9) 37.7, ND (81.8) 30.2, WA (81.6 58.8, AZ (81.4) 48.1, NV (81.0) 51.3,
Avg. for the fourth ten

OR (80.7) 56.2, TN (80.7) 36.4, OK (80.4) 30.7, AR (80.0) 35.8, MO (79.2) 39.9, AK (78.7) 41.6, TX (78.2) 45.2, MI (77.7) 49.9, ID (77.7) 31.7, WV (77.2) 27.9, WY (72.8) 24.3,
Avg. for bottom eleven

So, here, on an issue involving science made into a cause in the blue states, the red states are still in the lead, with 23 of the 27 states least trusting vaccination being red states, and 17 of the 24 states most trusting vaccination being blue states.

This distrust of science and critical thinking is brought further into the light when one considers this 2013 study on conspiracy theories in the United States.

Participants were asked to identify themselves on a spectrum from very conservative to very liberal. They were then asked if they believed in a series of prevalent conspircy theories. The results were striking.


JFK conspiracy 66 45 44 63 42 base 51 not sure 15 29 29 19 19 base 24
Bush misled about WMD's 18 23 53 71 79 base 44 not sure 13 15 9 8 14 base 12
Global warming a hoax VC 71 SC 52% M 22% SL 12% VL 14% base 37 not sure 12 20 11 6 7 base 12 (note vc one third as likely to believe as a moderate)
aliens? 28 27 32 23 35 base 29
NWO? 45 33 23 20 12 base 28 not sure 29 29 21 30 18 base 25
Saddam involved in 9/11 35 28 27 24 18 base 28 not sure 29 18 21 24 12 base 22
UFO crashed at Roswell 22 19 23 21 20 base 21
vaccines cause autism 22 19 23 18 12 base 20 not sure 39 35 29 34 37 base 34
big pharma makes diseases to make bucks 21 16 14 7 14 base 15 not sure 11 19 16 25 8 base 16
mind control through TV 23 9 16 15 14 base 15 not sure 11 21 14 20 1 base 15
bigfoot 18 12 13 14 14 base 14
CIA spread crack 17 5 15 17 26 base 14
Obama is anti-Christ 21 17 9 9 8 base 13 not sure 24 19 10 2 8 base 13
govt' allowed 9/11 to happen 11 11 8 15 14 base 11 not sure 8 11 14 13 8 base 11
Fluoride for sinister reasons 11 9 6 8 15 base 9
moon landing was fake 6 4 8 3 14 base 7
Bin Laden still alive VC 9 SC 4% M 7 SL 1% VL 7 base 6 not sure 19 8 8 10 10 base 11
chemtrails 10 6 - 6 12 base 5
fake Paul 8 4 2 7 11 base 5
lizard people 11 3 3 - 10 base 4

So, hmmm... It seems conservatives are far more prone to believe what the backers of the Republican party want them to believe, i.e., that Bush didn't mislead us into a war in Iraq, that Saddam Husein was involved in 9/11, that man-made global warming is a hoax, and that President Obama just may be the anti-Christ.

Well, this raises the question of whether or not these people know how to process information.

But before we get to that, let's take a look at a list combining these last three lists regarding belief in evolution, global warming, and vaccinations.

MA (10) 64.5, ME (14) 51.5, DC (22) 90.9, CA (23) 66.1, RI (23) 58.3, VT (24) 65.2, IL (31) 59.0, NY (33) 61.3, CT (34) 57.2, NH (34) 50.2,
Avg. for the first ten %

MD (39) 63.8, NJ (39) 57.3, NM (47) 54.7, HI (48) 67.5, VA (51) 52.9, MN (54) 50.8, CO (55) 52.7, FL (55) 49.4, DE (57) 56.0, WA (59) 58.8,
Avg. for the second ten

IA (64) 44.9, PA (65) 49.6, OR (69) 56.2, NC (77) 48.1, WI (78) 49.6

NE (78) 36.4, NV (79) 51.3, GA (79) 47.4, AK (86) 41.6, SD (87) 34.0,
Avg, for the third ten

AZ (88) 48.1, OH (91) 45.8, MT (97) 38.9, KS (98) 38.8, TX (105) 45.2, SC (105) 42.6, IN (105) 40.0, MI (106) 49.9, MO (116) 39.9, MS (117) 40.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

LA (117) 39.8, KY (120) 34.3, ND (123) 30.2, AL (125) 35.6, UT (128) 37.7, ID (129) 31.7, TN (135) 36.4, OK (135) 30.7, WY (135) 24.3, AR (140) 35.8, WV (146) 27.9, 
Avg. for bottom eleven


I. Well, then let's look at the election in terms of education. A chart on wikipedia presenting the percentage of adults receiving bachelor's degrees, and advanced degrees, by state, based on information from the U.S. Census Bureau, was consulted. These percentages were then added together. The states are presented with the total in parentheses in order of highest combined total to lowest combined total, along with the percentage at which they voted for Clinton against Trump. A clear trend is obvious. (I later compared this with this list, this list, and this list. )

DC (95.7)NA 90.9 MA (54.6)1 1 1 64.5 MD (53.3)2 8 16 63.8 CT (51.1)4 5 18 57.2 CO (48.6)3 17 25 52.7 VA (48.1)7 3 5 52.9 NJ (47.4)10 6 6 57.3 NY (46.4)13 15 8 61.3 VT (46.4)5 2 7 65.2 NH (43.2)6 4 11 50.2
Avg for the top ten 61.6%

IL (42.3)16 11 4 59.0
RI (42.2)21 11 20 58.3 WA (42.1)9 18 24 58.8 MN (41.8)8 7 2 50.8 CA (40.6)29 10 38 66.1 DE (40.1)17 23 45 56.0 KS (39.7)14 11 9 38.8 OR (39.6)12 25 34 56.2 HI (39.5)15 16 43 67.5 UT (37.6)11 20 23 37.7
Avg for the second ten 54.9%

GA (37.4)35 37 33 47.4 PA (36.6)28 21 21 49.6 ME (36.5)22 13 31 51.5 NE (36.2)18 9 9 36.4 NM (35.7)39 44 34 54.7

Well, look at that. I think we found the key factor in the election. Clinton won the sixteen most educated states and districts. And eighteen of the nineteen most educated states and districts. And twenty of the twenty-five most educated states and districts. Well, we know what's coming then. Trump won twenty-five of the twenty-six least educated states and districts.

MT (35.7)19 31 27 38.9 AK (35.6)20 31 37 41.6 NC (35.3)36 31 28 48.1 AZ (34.9)30 39 47 48.1 MO (34.7)31 34 14 39.9
Avg for the third ten 45.6%

FL (34.3)37 35 26 49.4 WI (34.1)24 19 11 49.6 MI (34.0)27 30 19 49.9 TX (34.0)42 38 40 45.2 OH (32.9)34 27 13 45.8 SC (32.7)40 41 42 42.6 IA (32.5)26 22 17 44.9 ND (32.5)23 23 14 30.2 SD (32.4)32 29 21 34.0 WY (31.7)25 25 3 24.3
Avg for the fourth ten 41.6%

ID (31.6)33 36 49 31.7 TN (30.9)43 28 40 36.4 IN (30.6)38 43 29 40.0 OK (30.1)41 47 44 30.7 AL (29.7)44 45 46 35.6 KY (29.5)46 40 29 34.3 NV (29.4)45 48 50 51.3 LA (28.3)48 49 39 39.8 MS (26.7)49 49 48 40.8 AR (25.0)47 45 36 35.8 WV (24.0)50 42 32 27.9
Avg for the bottom eleven is 36.8%

Note that the percentage of votes for Clinton over Trump dropped alongside the percentage of state occupants receiving a higher education. It doesn't get much clearer than that.

There's a direct correlation between having (or being around those having) an upper education and voting for Clinton, or, conversely, lacking (or being around those lacking) an upper education and voting for Trump!

And this isn't even news... Within days of the election, the Washington Post reported that the National Election Poll, an exit poll, found that white men without a college education voted for Trump by more than 3 to 1, 71 to 23. Similarly, Pew research claimed:

"Trump’s margin among whites without a college degree is the largest among any candidate in exit polls since 1980. Two-thirds (67%) of non-college whites backed Trump, compared with just 28% who supported Clinton, resulting in a 39-point advantage for Trump among this group. In 2012 and 2008, non-college whites also preferred the Republican over the Democratic candidate but by less one-sided margins (61%-36% and 58%-40%, respectively)."

Now here's the list for education by the rankings on the four lists.


DC (1, 2 NA) 90.9, MA (4) 64.5, VA (20) 52.9, VT (22) 65.2, MD (28) 63.8, NJ (28) 57.3, CT (30) 57.2, MN (30) 50.8, NH (30) 50.2, IL (41) 59.0,
Avg for the top ten

NY (43) 61.3, CO (49) 52.7, KS (50) 38.8, NE (59) 36.4, WA (63) 58.8,, RI (63) 58.3, UT (71) 37.7, WI (85) 49.6, OR (88) 56.2, ME (88) 51.5, 
Avg for the second ten

WY (89) 24.3, CA (91) 66.1, PA (91) 49.6, HI (92) 67.5, ND (97) 30.2,

DE (100) 56.0, IA (101) 44.9, MT (102) 38.9, OH (108) 45.8, MI (108) 49.9, 
Avg for the third ten

AK (113) 41.6, MO (117) 39.9, SD (120) 34.0, NC (122) 48.1, GA (125) 47.4, FL (128) 49.4, NM (141) 54.7, AZ (144) 48.1, IN (152) 40.0, TN (152) 36.4, 
Avg for the fourth ten

TX (153) 45.2, SC (158) 42.6, ID (158) 31.7, KY (160) 34.3, OK (175) 30.7, AR (177) 35.8, WV (177) 27.9, AL (179) 35.6,  LA (183) 39.8, NV (189) 51.3, MS (194) 40.8,
Avg for the bottom eleven is



Note that the addition of the three other lists, which took into account the high-school drop-out rate among other factors, fails to change the chart much. Smarter people voted for Cllnton.

This isn't snobbery. It's fact.

J. Now let's look at Tolerance. Three factors were studied. The prevalence of people of the belief ALL abortions should be illegal, the prevalence of people STRONGLY OPPOSED to same sex marriage, and the prevalence of people thinking immigrants are a burden on society (times .5). These numbers were added up. Here are the totals (Based on all the other charts, I assumed D.C. would have been number 1 if it had been included):

DC (NA) 90.9, NH (29.5) 50.2, MA (35) 64.5, OR (35.5) 56.2, RI (38) 58.3, NJ (38.5) 57.3, CT (40.5) 57.2, CO (41) 52.7, NY (41.5) 61.3, WA (42) 58.8,
Avg. for the top ten 60.7%

CA (43) 66.1,
HI (43.5) 67.5, NV (43.5) 51.3, DE (44) 56.0, VT (45) 65.2, MD (47.5) 63.8, MN (47.5) 50.8, IL (48.5) 59.0, AK (48.5) 41.6, AZ (50) 48.1,
Avg. for the second ten 56.9%

UT (50) 37.7, WI (51) 49.6, ME (52.5) 51.5, MI (52.5) 49.9, FL (53) 49.4,
 
ID (53) 31.7, MT (54) 38.9, IA (54.5) 44.9, NM (55.5) 54.7, PA (55.5) 49.6, 
Avg, for the third ten 45.8%

KS (56.5) 38.8, VA (57.5) 52.9, OH (58) 45.8, TX (59) 45.2, GA (59.5) 47.4, MO (60.5) 39.9, NE (61.5) 36.4, WY (61.5 approx) 24.3, NC (65) 48.1, LA (65.5) 39.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten 41.8%

SD (67) 34.0, ND (67) 30.2, OK (68) 30.7, IN (68.5) 40.0, SC (72) 42.6, AR (74.5) 35.8 TN (76.5) 36.4, KY (80.5) 34.3, MS (83) 40.8, AL (84) 35.6, WV (85) 27.9,
Avg. for bottom eleven 35.3%

The top eighteen are Clinton states. The bottom nineteen are Trump states. That sounds about right.

I later compared this list to the rankings of an online list on tolerance. Here was its results.

DC (NA) 90.9,
WI (1) 49.6, MD (2) 63.8, IL (3) 59.0, PA (4) 49.6, HI (5) 67.5, CA (6) 66.1, MN (7) 50.8, NJ (8) 57.3, NH (9) 50.2, NM (10) 54.7,
Avg. for the top ten

VA (11) 52.9,
 
IA (12) 44.9, NC (13) 48.1, CT (14) 57.2, FL (15) 49.4, LA (16) 39.8, NY (17) 61.3, MA (18) 64.5, WV (19) 27.9, NV (20) 51.3,
Avg. for the second ten

MT (21) 38.9, RI (22) 58.3, AK (23) 41.6, WA (24) 58.8, VT (25) 65.2,

OR (26) 56.2,
ME (27) 51.5, DE (28) 56.0, TX (29) 45.2, MI (30) 49.9,
Avg, for the third ten

CO (31) 52.7,
GA (32) 47.4, IN (33) 40.0, TN (34) 36.4, OK (35) 30.7, SC (36) 42.6, MO (37) 39.9, MS (38) 40.8, SD (39) 34.0, AL (40) 35.6,
Avg. for the fourth ten

KY (41) 34.3, ND (42) 30.2, AZ (43) 48.1, UT (44) 37.7, ID (45) 31.7, OH (46) 45.8, NE (47) 36.4,
KS (48) 38.8, AR (49) 35.8, WY (50 24.3, 
Avg. for bottom ten

Well, heck, even the Daily Beast has concluded the nineteen least tolerant states voted for Trump.

As there was a wide gap in the results, I decided to average them out. Here are the two lists listed in order of the rankings on the lists when added together.


DC (NA) 90.9,

NH (10) 50.2,
NJ (13) 57.3, HI (16) 67.5, CA (16) 66.1, MD (17) 63.8, MA (20) 64.5, IL (20) 59.0, CT (20) 57.2, WI (22) 49.6, MN (23) 50.8,
Avg. for the top ten

NY (25) 61.3,
RI (26) 58.3, OR (29) 56.2, NV (32) 51.3, WA (33) 58.8, PA (33) 49.6, CO (38) 52.7, NM (38) 54.7, VT (39) 65.2, FL (39) 49.4,
Avg. for the second ten

IA (39) 44.9, DE (41) 56.0,  AK (41) 41.6, VA (42) 52.9, MT (47) 38.9,

ME (49) 51.5,
NC (51) 48.1, MI (53) 49.9, LA (55) 39.8, AZ (62) 48.1,
Avg, for the third ten

TX (62) 45.2, UT (64) 37.7, GA (66) 47.4, WV (69) 27.9, ID (70) 31.7, MO (72) 39.9, IN (76) 40.0, OK (77) 30.7, OH (78) 45.8, KS (78) 38.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

SD (79) 34.0, SC (80) 42.6, TN (80) 36.4, NE (83) 36.4, ND (83) 30.2, MS (86) 40.8, WY (87) 24.3, KY (88) 34.3, AL (89) 35.6, AR (94) 35.8
Avg. for bottom ten


Now let's take into account the past. Here are the states in order of when they ultimately repealed their state laws against "race-mixing". (Some states went back and forth, mostly during and after reconstruction.)DC (NA) 90.9,   

Never passed a miscegenation law. (Ranked by order of when the state became a state) 9
NJ (1787) 57.3, CT (1787) 57.2, NH (1788) 50.2, NY (1788) 61.3, VT (1791) 65.2, WI (1848) 49.6, MN (1858) 50.8, AK (1959) 41.6, HI (1959) 67.5,

Repealed by the state before 1900. (Ranked in order of when the law was repealed) 11
PA (1780) 49.6, MA (1843) 64.5, IA (1851) 44.9, KS (1859) 38.8, NM (1866) 54.7, WA (1868) 58.8, IL (1874) 59.0, RI (1881) 58.3, ME (1883) 51.5, MI (1883) 49.9, OH (1887) 45.8,

Repealed by state after 1900 (Ranked in order of when the law was repealed) 14
CA (1948) 66.1, OR (1951) 56.2, MT (1953) 38.9, ND (1955) 30.2, CO (1957) 52.7, SD (1957) 34.0, NV (1959) 51.3, ID (1959) 31.7, AZ (1962) 48.1, UT (1963) 37.7, NE (1963) 36.4, IN (1965) 40.0, WY (1965) 24.3, MD (1967) 63.8, 

Note that when Oregon repealed its miscegenation laws in 1951, it became 1 of 20 states to allow inter-racial marriage...of the 48 states. Of those 20, 14 would go on to vote for Clinton. Of the remaining 28, only 5 would vote for Clinton.

Repealed by Loving v. Virginia, 1967. (Ranked in order of length of life of the law) 16
OK (1897) 30.7, WV (1883) 27.9, AR (1838) 35.8, TX (1837) 45.2, MO (1835) 39.9, FL (1832) 49.4, MS (1822) 40.8, AL (1822) 35.6, KY (1792) 34.3, GA (1750) 47.4, TN (1741) 36.4,  
LA (1724) 39.8, DE (1721) 56.0, SC (1717) 42.6, NC (1715) 48.1, VA (1691) 52.9,

Heck, 14 of the 16 voted for Trump! Note that of the final 16 states, most of them remain low on the tolerance scale. (Note: The scores are upped by 1 by the addition of DC at the top) OK 43, WV 51, AR 46, TX 34, MO 36, FL 25, MS 49, AL 50, KY 48, GA 35, TN 47, LA 40, DE 14, SC 45, NC 39, VA 32. Yowza! The bottom 13 of these states ALL voted for Trump.



The Voting Rights Act of 1965 wikipedia
 
The 1965 coverage formula included the whole of Alabama, Alaska (sic, I think this is a mistaken) Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Virginia; (5 0f 6 TRUMP) and some subdivisions (usually counties) in Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, and North Carolina (40 counties of NC--roughly half the state, which has 100 counties).[40]

The 1968 coverage resulted in the partial coverage of Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, and Wyoming. Connecticut, Idaho, Maine, Massachusetts, and Wyoming filed successful "bailout" lawsuits, as also provided by section 4.[40]
The 1972 coverage formula covered the whole of Alaska, Arizona, and Texas (ALL THREE TRUMP), and parts of California, Florida, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, and South Dakota.[40] The special provisions of the Act were due to expire in 1970, and Congress renewed them for another five years. In 1975, the Act's special provisions were extended for another seven years. In 1982, the coverage formula was extended again, this time for 25 years, but no changes were made to the coverage, and in 2006, the coverage formula was again extended for 25 years.[40]




K. And now, only now, let's add in cultural diversity as just another factor. Here it is again.

CA (131.7) 66.1, HI (119.4) 67.5, TX (107.9) 45.2, NM (107.4) 54.7, NV (97.3) 51.3,  DC (96.7) 90.9, NY (95.6) 61.3, NJ (94.3) 57.3, FL (91.5) 49.4, AZ (83.8) 48.1, 
Avg. for the top ten 58.4%

IL (73.4) 59.0, GA (68.4) 47.4, MD (68.1) 63.8, CT (65.5) 57.2, VA (63.8) 52.9, MA (62.9) 64.5, AK (61.2) 41.6, WA (60.6) 58.8, RI (58.6) 58.3, CO (57.7) 52.7,  
Avg. for the second ten 49.9%

DE (57.2) 56.0, NC (54.4) 48.1, LA (52.7) 39.8, OK (48.9) 30.7, MS (48.3) 40.8,  

OR (47.7) 56.2,
SC (47.6) 42.6, UT (43.5) 37.7, AL (41.5) 35.6, KS (40.9) 38.8, 
Avg. for the third ten 46.9%

AR (38.8) 35.8, PA (38.6) 49.6, TN (36.9) 36.4, MN (36.8) 50.8, MI (36.4) 49.9, NE (35.7) 36.4, ID (33.2) 31.7, IN (31.9) 40.0, WI (30.7) 49.6, OH (30.1) 45.8, 

Avg. for the fourth ten 45.6%

MO (28.8) 39.9, SD (24.6) 34.0, KY (24.0) 34.3, IA (24.2) 44.9, WY (23.4) 24.3, NH (21.4) 50.2, ND (21.1) 30.2, MT (19.0) 38.9, ME (16.4) 51.5, VT (14.9) 65.2, WV (10.6) 27.9,


CA (145.5) 66.1, DC (135.7) 90.9, HI (131.7) 67.5, TX (120.5) 45.2, NM (118.5) 54.7, NY (116.0) 61.3, NJ (112.6) 57.3, FL (108.6) 49.4, NV (107.5) 51.3, AZ (97.3) 48.1, 
Avg. for the top ten

IL (90.6) 59.0, MD (87.0) 63.8, GA (85.5) 47.4, MA (85.1) 64.5, CT (82.9) 57.2, RI (81.7) 58.3, VA (77.3) 52.9, DE (77.0) 56.0, WA (72.6) 58.8, NC (72.1) 48.1, 
Avg. for the second ten

LA (68.9) 39.8, CO (66.1) 52.7, OR (65.4) 56.2, MS (64.5) 40.8, SC (64.1) 42.6,

OK (62.1) 30.7, AL (58.9) 35.6, AK (57.0) 41.6, AR (54.7) 35.8, PA (53.3) 49.6,  
Avg. for the third ten

MI (53.2) 49.9, KS (53.2) 38.8, TN (51.9) 36.4, UT (49.8) 37.7, OH (47.5) 45.8, MN (47.3) 50.8, IN (47.2) 40.0, NE (45.0) 36.4, MO (44.7) 39.9, WI (40.9) 49.6, 
Avg. for the fourth ten

ID (40.7) 31.7, KY (40.5) 34.3, ME (36.8) 51.5, SD (36.6) 34.0, NH (36.1) 50.2, IA (35.0) 44.9, VT (34.8) 65.2, MT (25.6) 38.9, WY (26.1) 24.3, WV (23.5) 27.9, ND (19.6) 30.2,

Well, that's pretty convincing. But, what's up with New England? And Minnesota? Why did they vote for Clinton when they are demographically closer to Trump country--Wyoming, South Dakota and Montana.

And here's worldliness, based upon 2016 over 18 population estimates divided by new passports issued by state

DC (2.9) 90.9, NJ (10.6) 57.3, NY (11.5) 61.3, MA (11.6) 64.5, AK (12.1) 41.6, CT (12.2) 57.2, NH (12.2) 50.2, CA (12.3) 66.1, MN (12.4) 50.8, WA (12.9) 58.8,

CO (13.2) 52.7,
MD (13.3) 63.8, 
HI (13.4) 67.5,
IL (13.7) 59.0, UT (14.0) 37.7, RI (14.1) 58.3, SC (14.3) 42.6, VA (14.4) 52.9, VT (14.9) 65.2, FL (14.9) 49.4,

OR (15.1) 56.2,
NV (15.7) 51.3,
TX (15.8) 45.2, DE (16.6) 56.0, ND (16.6) 30.2,

ME (16.8) 51.5
, AZ (16.8) 48.1, MT (17.0) 38.9, ID (17.1) 31.7, WI (17.4) 49.6, 

PA (17.7) 49.6, NM (18.2) 54.7, GA (18.5) 47.4, NE (18.9) 36.4, MI (19.4) 49.9, IA (19.4) 44.9, WY (19.4) 24.3, KS (19.8) 38.8, SD (19.8) 34.0, MO (20.5) 39.9,

OH (20.7) 45.8, NC (21.5) 48.1, IN (22.6) 40.0, OK (23.3) 30.7, TN (25.2) 36.4, LA (26.0) 39.8, KY (29.3) 34.3, AR (30.4) 35.8, AL (31.9) 35.6, WV (40.4) 27.9, MS (41.2) 40.8,

 

 

 



Diversity ranking - Tolerance ranking followed by hate crime rate and number of discrimination suits per 100 thou
1-10: NH (44-1, 2.1 + 12.3) 50.2, WI (39-9, 1 + 9.2) 49.6, VT (46-19, 4.0 + 21.7) 65.2, MN (35-10, 6.0 + 8.7) 50.8, IA (45-21, 0.6 + 37.5) 44.9, MT (47-25, 2.9 + 8.7) 38.9, ME (42-26, 3.8 + 22.5) 51.5, WV (49-34, 1.4 + 12.6) 27.9, PA (29-16, 0.4 + 11.8) 49.6, OR (22-13, 5.5 + 12.9) 56.2,
 

11-20: MA (13-6, 5.1 + 21.1) 64.5, CT (14-8, 5.6 + 16.8) 57.2, MD (10-5, 1.8 + 7.8) 63.8, ND (50-45, 2.3 + 32.8) 30.2, NJ (6-2, 6.3 + 12.1) 57.3, CO (21-17, 4.2 + 10.3) 52.7, AK (27-23, 3.1 + 9.3) 41.6, ID (39-35, 2.3 + 23.9) 31.7, IL (10-7, 1.5 + 14.5) 59.0, WA (18-15, 3.1 + 20.6) 58.8,

21-25:  RI (15-12, 3.4 + 24.4) 58.3, MI (30-28, 3.2 + 21.2) 49.9, MO (36-38, 2.1 + 29.4) 39.9, SD (43-41, 5.8 + 9.4) 34.0, WY (49-47, 1.5 + 201.9) 24.3,

26-30: UT (33-32, 1.7 + 11.8) 37.7, HI (2-3, 0.1 + 20.3) 67.5, IN (36-37, 1.5 + 16.4) 40.0, CA (1-4, 2.7 + 8.7) 66.1, DE (17-22, 4.2 + 15.8) 56.0,

31-40: OH (34-39, 3.1 + 24.2) 45.8, NY (5-11, 3.3 + 17.8) 61.3, NV (8-14, 2.1 + 15.9) 51.3, NE (37-44, 5.1 + 38.8) 36.4, KY (41-48, 4.7 + 13.4) 34.3, VA (16-24, 1.9 + 8.5) 52.9, KS (31-40, 5.6 + 23.0) 38.8, NC (19-27, 1.1 + 11.5) 48.1, LA (20-29, 0.5 + 14.8) 39.8, TN (32-43, 2.7 + 13.8) 36.4,

41-50:  FL (7-20, 0.7 + 18.7) 49.4, OK (25-38, 1.6 + 13.8) 30.7, NM (4-18, 1.3 + 12.2) 54.7, SC (24-42, 2.7 + 10.6) 42.6, AZ (9-30, 3.4 + 18.7) 48.1, GA (12-33, 0.1 + 12.5) 47.4, AR (28-50, 2.7 + 23.9) 35.8, MS (23-46, 0.2 + 11.6) 40.8, AL (26-49, 0.3 + 12.8) 35.6, TX (3-31, 0.7 + 18.8) 45.2, 


 

Total for Rankings of A - K  (Education, Empathy, and Cultural Diversity)

DC (33, 1 NA) 90.9,
MA (65) 64.5
, NY (77) 61.3, CA (94) 66.1, CT (94) 57.2, VT (101) 65.2, HI (119) 67.5, NJ (119) 57.3, IL (135) 59.0, MD (137) 63.8,
Range for first ten

WA (142) 58.8, RI (143) 58.3, OR (170) 56.2, NH (181) 50.2, ME (190) 51.5, DE (197) 56.0, MN (200) 50.8, CO (214) 52.7, NM (219) 54.7, NV (245) 51.3,
Avg. for second ten range 58.8 - 50.2

VA (248) 52.9, WI (252) 49.6, PA (268) 49.6, FL (270) 49.4, AK (302) 41.6, 

AZ (304) 48.1, IA (308) 44.9, MI (309) 49.9, TX (314) 45.2, OH (320) 45.8,
Avg. for third ten range 52.9 - 41.6

NC (338) 48.1, GA (342) 47.4, NE (371) 36.4, KS (373) 38.8, MT (375) 38.9, IN (390) 40.0, MO (395) 39.9, UT (398) 37.7, LA (415) 39.8, SC (419) 42.6,
Avg. for fourth ten range 48.1 - 36.4

ID (430) 31.7, KY (431) 34.3, OK (433) 30.7, ND (442) 30.2, MS (449) 40.8, WY (450) 24.3, SD (453) 34.0, AR (454) 35.8, WV (463) 27.9, TN (473) 36.4, AL (487) 35.6,
Avg. for bottom eleven range 40.8 - 24.3

In  sum, then, the people who think like Michael Moore lost, and the people who look like Michael Moore won.


So it's real. The election was not about the economy. It was about a culture war that many on the Clinton side didn't understand. To them, higher education, an appreciation of science, a physically active lifestyle and sensible gun laws are good things--obvious good things--and they can't quite grasp that there is a large sector of the country who disagrees with them on this, and would rather vote for a hate-mongering, self-promoting, tax-cheating con man than a smug woman, who drinks wine and wears pantsuits, for chrissakes.


Don't Count.
G. Most short-changed by the U.S. Government. This list reflects the states most short-changed in both the Electoral College (when compared to population), and taxes, when compared to taxes sent to Washington vs. Federal expenditures within the state.

NOTE: when adding this in, it should be added in in reverse order so that the most short-changed gets a 50 etc...

DC (NA)
NJ 57.3, MN 50.8, IL 59.0, CO 52.7, MA 64.5, NY 61.3, WI 49.6, MI 49.9, CT 57.2, CA 66.1,
Avg. for the top ten

WA 58.8, OR 56.2, FL 49.4, OH 45.8, NC 48.1, TX 45.2, PA 49.6, GA 47.4, IN 40.0, NV 51.3,
Avg. for the second ten

IA 44.9, MO 39.9, MD 63.8, NH 50.2, TN 36.4,

AZ 48.1, KS 38.8, SC 42.6, VA 52.9, KY 34.3,
Avg. for the third ten

OK 30.7, UT 37.7, DE 56.0, NE 36.4, AR 35.8, LA 39.8, AL 35.6, ME 51.5, ID 31.7, MS 40.8,
Avg. for the fourth ten

MT 38.9, RI 58.3, WV 27.9, VT 65.2, NM 54.7, SD 34.0, HI 67.5, ND 30.2, AK 41.6, WY 24.3
Avg. for bottom ten


11. The Caliifornia problem.
He is not our president. Compare to conditions under which the 13 colonies broke away from England. (If this had happened in Poland, etc, at the end of the cold war, we'd have armed the resistance, with the backing of every Republican member of congress.) How he handles this will determine his legacy, IMO. If he tries to force his will upon us, as is his way, it will build resentment and further divide the nation.  California pop would make it the 36th largest country, with more people than Canada or Poland, and its economy would make it the sixth most powerful country, after the US China Japan Germany and the UK, slightly more powerful than France and almost twice as powerful as Russia. And if you include New York, which also hates Trump, then we're talking about a bloc of roughly 60 million people, with a 4 trillion dollar GDP. That's the 23rd most populous country in the world, between France and Italy, with an economic might greater than Germany, and following only the US China and Japan. Trump shouldn't try to control us. The US supported the solidarity movement in Poland in the eighties and the Ukrainian independence movement in the 90's and there's not much difference between what happened there and what's at stake here. The citizens of Cali and NY certainly hate Trump about as much as the citizens of Poland and the Ukraine hated the Soviet Union.

12. If it's any consolation, people in Trump states die faster than people in Clinton states. Clinton states have an average life expectancy of 79.7. 26 of the 30 Trump states have a life expectancy below that level. The Trump states on average have a life expectancy of 77.8.

If the election were based on total popular vote I would have campaigned in N.Y. Florida and California and won even bigger and more easily



The Electoral College is actually genius in that it brings all states, including the smaller ones, into play. Campaigning is much different!

5:40 AM - 15 Nov 2016

(There are, in fact, few instances in which a "loser" lost his home state by any size-able margin. In 1920, Ohioan James Cox lost to fellow Ohioan Warren G. Harding 58.47 to 38.58. And in 1912, former Republican President Teddy Roosevelt ran as a third party candidate against his successor William Howard Taft and split the Republican Party. As a consequence, he lost both his own home state of New York, 41.27 to 24.56, and President Taft's home state of Ohio, 40.96 to 26.82, to Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson. Yep, that's right. In 1912, Woodrow Wilson beat two major candidates in their home states, only to have the favor returned four years later, when he lost his own home state to Republican candidate Charles Evans Hughes. Ahhh...the fickle finger of fate...)



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